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The 2019 Garden, Landscape, and Other Stuff Thread...

Discussion in 'Community Center' started by eisman, Jan 13, 2019.

  1. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    Had I thought about it, I should have moved both hornworms to the old plants where they could munch to their delight. I will be yanking those plants as soon as a couple small tomatoes ripen on them.

    Been hot here too. We are in the midst of another heat wave in the mid to upper 90's. We haven't had any rain in two weeks here.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2019
    taldesta likes this.
  2. SW-EDC

    SW-EDC Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Dec 4, 2015
    If I had older plants, I would leave them alone too. They turn into beautiful moths.
     
    taldesta likes this.
  3. eisman

    eisman Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 9, 2009
    My latest project is this bird feeder. Empty now, but that's going to change pretty fast. I put it together because I couldn't find anything I liked that worked. This is about 7' tall, holds two large suet blocks, and should be safe from any heavy winds we get. Plus it's got some rain protection, and the rodent stopper actually works. Working on a loose seed feeder for the other birds too. Been doing some of the winter prep trimming this past weekend, and with luck I may even get the mulch laid down before Thanksgiving. I have to figure out what to do with the tall lilies though. The old ones need thinning, the three super tall ones are gonna go away. And fewer tulips this coming year too.

    [​IMG]
     
    Win Heger, taldesta and 22-rimfire like this.
  4. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    Pretty classy feeder! I like the pole! Pretty much what I use for blue bird boxes, just a thinner diameter. I don't feed enough suet to justify a feeder like this. Suet is not standard fair at my house although I do put it out occasionally in the winter.

    Did you drive the pole into the ground or dig a hole?
     
  5. eisman

    eisman Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 9, 2009
    Dug a post hole about 18"+ deep and then used this expandable foam to set it in place. It's pretty amazing stuff. I used it last year when we had a storm knock down some fencing and I wasn't up to mixing concrete in the rain and the fence needed to be fixed. Turned an hours long job into a much shorter one, sets up solid with no major mess and seems to be lasting as the poles I set then are still rock solid and holding.

    I'll trim this down to grass level now it's cured and when, I finally get the dirt to raise the ground level up to the top of the retaining wall, it'll be invisible.

    [​IMG]
     
    taldesta, LEGION 12 and 22-rimfire like this.
  6. LEGION 12

    LEGION 12 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 8, 2009
    Everything is still going strong in the raised bed . [​IMG]
     
    taldesta likes this.
  7. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    Here is a status picture on my container growing celery. We have fortunate to have gotten a couple localized thundershowers here, but it is still considered "moderate drought" conditions. Temps hit 100 degree F today. That is hot for September; actually hot anytime here regardless of the month. Garden stuff is winding down although we still are getting sufficient ripe tomatoes and the peppers are starting to rejuvenate for their fall growth.
    IMG_5243ed.jpg

    Hummingbirds are very actively hitting the feeders now and have been for a couple weeks. It is not uncommon to have six hitting at once. This is much more activity than normal. I replaced the nectar today as they had drank it down to nearly empty. Probably still have another couple weeks of hummingbird activity unless we get a cold spell.
     
    LEGION 12 and taldesta like this.
  8. taldesta

    taldesta Retired :-) Time is the Gold Platinum Member

    Jan 24, 2013
    Fall temps here are 70-75F daytime and no longer do the gardens need watering ... perhaps just a little too warm in the sunshine for heavy work that needs to be done - but I'll take it! 100F would drop me in my tracks :eek: Celery looks great - definitely enjoys the long growing season.

    Extension to veg garden in the wild is planned for next spring - cardboard 'lasagna' is placed to weaken roots of jungle.

    DSCF7430 SWEET PEA COMPOST LASAGNA VEG GARDEN 650 MED.jpg

    Coleus 'Ruby Slipper' has thrived again this year on the porch. One of these planters is from cuttings taken from 2018. Daisy is drinking from the fountain which has been taken over all summer by the frog - so not so much a fountain as a reservoir for dog and frog. Thunbergia (black eyed susan vine) climbs from its floor pot to the sky at the back - and wants to go much higher. Jack and the Beanstock comes to mind.

    DSCF7505 DAISY DRINKS COLEUS PORCH 650 MED.jpg


    Last visit I've seen from the wild turkey mom and little ones. They found the birdfeeder leavings on the 'lawn' but remain very wary.

    DSCF7546 WILD TURKEYS 3 BIRDFEEDER 650 MED.jpg
     
    annr likes this.
  9. taldesta

    taldesta Retired :-) Time is the Gold Platinum Member

    Jan 24, 2013
    Yesterday there was a female hummingbird at the feeder; the day before there was a juvenile female - both on their own from my observation. Both seemed strong as they hit the feeder and the nasturtiums. Please know that, every time I see one at this time of the year, I mutter under my breath - go South, now! Actually I mutter a little more than that under my breath :D

    DSCF7413 FEMALE HUMMINGBIRD JUVENILE NASTURTIURTIUM CROPPED  650 MED.jpg

    There are still lots of flowers - glads, cosmos, petunias, gaillardia, zinnias, nasturtiums and even a little bee balm for the hummingbirds. They can tank up well here for the migration. Some monarchs are still here as well. Get winging it South, you guys, while the getting's good!

    DSCF7608 COSMO GLAD PLANTERS NASTURTIUM 650 MED.jpg

    All the gardens are maturing. Here, the amaranth (Love Lies Bleeding) has bloomed into red elephantine trunks. There are many varieties.

    DSCF7656 AMARANTH LOVE LIES BLEEDING 650 MED.jpg

    Meanwhile, fall means a heavy workload here. Trailer lights are driving me crazy because I've had the van in and had that section checked out but still one trailer light won't work even though I've replaced it - while the other one works. Taking time I don't have at this time of the year when I have a lot of trailering to do.

    Also, a gusty windstorm grabbed a couple of small slits in the tarp shed and blew the whole roof off - split it down the middle the entire length 20'. Lucky I am a collector of tarps :D

    Now I must compress the contents into the small wooden shed behind the house. Wish me luck with that!
     
    annr and 22-rimfire like this.
  10. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    I believe I have the Ruby Slipper red Coleus also. It doesn't seem to go to flower like the other varieties that I have. Your's looks fantastic!! The small leaf variety (green & reddish) also doesn't seem to go to seed easily either. Will comment further in a bit.

    A bit later this year (before frost), I may take some cuttings and begin to root them as they root easily in water. They provide stunning foliage color. That will save me a couple bucks come May of next year. I just have so much green stuff that winters inside the house to do much more. I would like to add some cactus to the mix however. Cats might just not like that much. ;)

    This heat is KILLING ME. I had to do a job on Monday wearing Tyvek suit and respirator and it was 100 there too. I was totally soaking wet when I was finished. Had a complete set of clean dry clothes to put on after I was finished. I know how it is with wet clothes and AC in a vehicle... I would be getting cold on my 200 mile drive home if I didn't change.

    I am still watering my garden every couple of days. It doesn't take long if I use a water hose.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2019 at 11:58 AM
    taldesta likes this.
  11. annr

    annr Basic Member Basic Member

    Nov 15, 2006
    We had some turkey action today, a bit different though. It may be difficult to see, but there are 2 turkeys blocking the road (at rush hour). They won't move, so a woman comes out with a broom and starts swatting at them. That doesn't work; they start charging on her, and she retreats.

    Then a man with a noose comes out (not shown here) waving it threateningly at the turkeys. After about 10 min, the turkeys get out of the road. (This was caputured on video, with soundtrack. Sorry I can't provide the complete experience.)

    IMG_2712.jpeg IMG_5533.jpeg
     
    taldesta, Win Heger and 22-rimfire like this.
  12. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    Good story. Turkeys can be aggressive. I have heard them trying to attack someone wearing a blue shirt. Apparently the gobblers turn bluish when they are being aggressive. This probably demonstrates that we need to hunt them more.
     
  13. annr

    annr Basic Member Basic Member

    Nov 15, 2006
    Interesting. Yeah, I don't know how that would work in the city limits. (The woman with the broom is the driver of that white truck--stopped at the front of that line of cars; I doubt she could pull out her shotgun or muzzleloader right there, even on Oct. 21.:D) ETA: in the video, you can see the cars from different directions trying to drive around the turkeys and the turkeys running around with the lady waving her broom...accompanied by Bach violin concerto!

    I checked and you can hunt them 2x/year with license and permit:
    • Spring season: April 29 - May 25; Hunting hours begin ½ hour before sunrise and end at noon
    • Fall season: Oct. 21 - Nov. 2; Hunting hours begin ½ hour before sunrise and end ½ hour after sunset.
    • The annual limit is 2 wild turkeys, but you may only harvest 1 per day.
    • Shotgun: No larger than 10 gauge using #4-#7 shot.
    • Muzzleloader: No larger than.775 caliber smoothbore muzzleloading shotgun using #4-#7 size shot.
    • Archery Equipment: Arrows must have a well sharpened steel broadhead blades not less than 7/8 inches in width...

    Wild turkeys in Massachusetts
    At the time of colonial settlement, the wild turkey was widespread in Massachusetts. Due to habitat loss, turkeys were extirpated from the state and the last known native bird was killed in 1851. In the 1970s, MassWildlife biologists trapped 37 turkeys in New York and released them in the Berkshires... In 1991, the wild turkey was named the state’s official game bird. The estimated population now between 30,000 and 35,000 birds!
    (Didn't know that.)
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2019 at 9:51 PM
  14. LEGION 12

    LEGION 12 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 8, 2009
    October 21st there will be no turkeys to be seen . :)
     
    annr likes this.
  15. annr

    annr Basic Member Basic Member

    Nov 15, 2006
    Market forces at work: just in time to drive up prices for Thanksgiving.;)
     
  16. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    When I visit the Smoky's (National Park), I drive around turkeys all the time. They move. They are pretty common and folks don't even bother taking pictures of them for the most part unless the gobbler is fanning it's tail feathers.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2019 at 12:46 PM
  17. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    My Dad used to use newspaper for mulch in our large family garden around tomatoes and green peppers. It was a very effective weed barrier. Didn't look great but since they got a daily paper, this "recycling" was better than burning or putting in the trash. He didn't want to buy mulch (straw) as it would take quite a bit. Truck farms of course use black plastic as a weed barrier in their fields.
     
    taldesta likes this.
  18. Win Heger

    Win Heger Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 29, 2000
    Our hummingbirds are pretty much gone, right on schedule! We've seen a little more Turkey activity, they're in the neighborhood. Here they are under my seed feeder cleaning up.

    [​IMG]
     
    taldesta and annr like this.

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