Off Topic The Hand Tool thread

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Ooh, that's a handy tool with that shaft driver, me, I rely on a simple hammer when using those toothed chisels, the fluted ones aren't familiar. If you are cutting through walls to install pipe or conduit etc... the hole sizes are fairly routine, no need for a wide range. My idea is old Mr Corry used the kit for plumbing or electric work.
(referring to that kit posted by gben up there a few stops back)
 
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Feb 28, 2009
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Found a neat little sale on Sunday. Apparently there was some football game or something, so there was only one other guy there. And he didn't like cool stuff.







Not sure the last couple count as "tools". But they are still pretty cool.

Nice! Looks like everyone used the KEEN KUTTER LOGO for their spade blade drill pattern.
 
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If you are cutting through walls to install pipe or conduit etc... the hole sizes are fairly routine, no need for a wide range. My idea is old Mr Corry used the kit for plumbing or electric work.(referring to that kit posted by gben up there a few stops back)

Thanks to all who replied on this set of tools. I happen to be a union electrician and I am very familiar with putting holes through masonry to run conduits etc.. Electrical installations, and plumbing can use a wide range of hole sizes from 1/2" pipe up to many inches in diameter, and that is why this set does not look like it is for a common building trade. I think that it is more likely that a stone-cutter would use the same size hole over and over. The drills with the flutes are common "start" drills, which I have used on the job a few times when power tools were not available, but these days if you have to use hand-tools to go through masonry it means the contractor is poor or a moron. I am poor, so I had to use them before I had an electric hammer-drill, and one time a contractor I worked for did not supply enough power equipment for everyone so I used star drills on the job instead of standing around with my thumb in my ass.
 
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Thanks to all who replied on this set of tools. I happen to be a union electrician and I am very familiar with putting holes through masonry to run conduits etc.. Electrical installations, and plumbing can use a wide range of hole sizes from 1/2" pipe up to many inches in diameter, and that is why this set does not look like it is for a common building trade. I think that it is more likely that a stone-cutter would use the same size hole over and over. The drills with the flutes are common "start" drills, which I have used on the job a few times when power tools were not available, but these days if you have to use hand-tools to go through masonry it means the contractor is poor or a moron. I am poor, so I had to use them before I had an electric hammer-drill, and one time a contractor I worked for did not supply enough power equipment for everyone so I used star drills on the job instead of standing around with my thumb in my ass.
Solidarity. Union crane operator here.
 
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Found a neat little sale on Sunday. Apparently there was some football game or something, so there was only one other guy there. And he didn't like cool stuff.







Not sure the last couple count as "tools". But they are still pretty cool.
Well done man! Rare to find so many nice pieces in one place!? Did you get good deals on the stuff?
I've been gathering KK items but it's taken me years of a piece here and a piece there to acquire them. Great scores!
 
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Aug 11, 2019
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Well done man! Rare to find so many nice pieces in one place!? Did you get good deals on the stuff?
I've been gathering KK items but it's taken me years of a piece here and a piece there to acquire them. Great scores!
Lol, I wish I could say I got it all for a dollar. It was at least twice that. But this was one of those when will I ever find this much in one place at once deals. And I talked to the old guy who owned it all. So that made me sentimental. So I bought some more. And to be fair, my wife went back and bought some too LOL. I'm clearing off a wall for it all now. Better than it going and gathering dust in an antique mall. And now I have to go find 9 more KK hatchets LOL. Thanks for checking it out!
 
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Lol, I wish I could say I got it all for a dollar. It was at least twice that. But this was one of those when will I ever find this much in one place at once deals. And I talked to the old guy who owned it all. So that made me sentimental. So I bought some more. And to be fair, my wife went back and bought some too LOL. I'm clearing off a wall for it all now. Better than it going and gathering dust in an antique mall. And now I have to go find 9 more KK hatchets LOL. Thanks for checking it out!
Ooooooohhhhh you got the bug BAD! Cleaning off walls and buying collections...hahaha. We'll have to call it the woodings "VeronaVirus". Hahaha.
 
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Dec 20, 2015
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So here are some very unexciting hand tool pics.
Thank you,nice to see neat old tools anytime.I like that bar clamp:)
Disston is cool(surely you have a link to that Disston dating-by-medallion database?...i don't,but someone will shoot it to you if necessary).
Btw,if someone needs a replacement handle for a cross cut i have a few kicking about...Not as nice as that one,but a few kinda decent ones...
 
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Jan 15, 2020
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I wasn't going to post these. But man, it is quiet today. So here are some very unexciting hand tool pics.
Well, except maybe the Disston. I was happy about that one. It is a PHILA, so pre war right?





Those shears in the middle picture. They are still in use on farms all over the UK (probably elsewhere in the world but I don't know) as occasional use sheep wool shears. I have 3 old pairs and use them fairly regularly for trimming a few dirty tails when I can't he bothered to set up the electric machine. I've even shorn a whole sheep with one once or twice but I wouldn't make a habit of it. It's quite enjoyable if the shears are sharp and the sheep behaves :rolleyes::p
No one has really made anything better for occasional use yet and most farms will still have their grandfathers or someone's old set sitting in a shed somewhere so they still get used. Quite difficult things to sharpen well too.
 
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Dec 20, 2015
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Thanks for such neat historic note.
Not many realise what an important tool it was...The entire developement and wealth of so many areas of British Isles was pretty much hung on this very implement...(i only know very little,and about a small part of it all-the Cotswolds,but from what i understand some of the greatest cathedrals,Gloucestershire,Chester and like,were all built on revenue collected by means of this very tool).
The progress of steel development itself was greatly influenced by process of manufacturing of shears."Shear steel",at the time the fanciest grade of carburated and piled steel,was the industry's definition of excellence...
 
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