The most important lesson you've learned about knives.

Gilbert G

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2019
Messages
303
As predicted so many great posts and lots to learn from too even if you been in the "knife game" for awhile.

But this is just funny as hell....:D
The more knives you own the smarter and better looking you become.
 

gazz98

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2008
Messages
4,250
I learned a long time ago that everyone else on this forum has more money then I do.

I also learned (thru trial and error) that my sweet spot for a knife is $70-100 for the most part. Even lower then that on a few occasions (Ontario Rat 1 D2 specifically).
 

TRfromMT

Gold Member
Basic Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2016
Messages
4,860
There's a story out there about a boy who saw his dad hire two men who applied for a job, one of whom carried a pocket knife, and paid him a dollar more than the other guy. The son asked why, and he said it was because he carried a knife. The son still didn't understand, and the dad explained it was because he was clearly more prepared, and that would make him a better worker. Something like that. It's a sappy story.

But I do find that I simply feel more prepared, and have a better mindset, when I carry a knife (just about 100% of the time, no matter what). Even if I don't use it for the day for anything, I am more prepared having one with me. Oddly enough, my wife never carries a knife. But she will occasionally ask me if I have mine with me, for no other reason that even she knows I'm better off - and therefore she is - if I have it with me.
 

TrainedBullets

Gold Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2017
Messages
276
1. Always carry at least one knife - I saved my wife’s finger once with a small, sharp folder. You never know when the critical need will come.
2. Don’t lend - Ask the person what they need to cut, then offer to do it yourself instead. If you do lend, don’t be shocked when someone uses it as a pry bar or screwdriver.
3. Fixed and folder is a winning combination. Fixed for speed, ease of use, harder or longer use. Folder for those times you want to be discreet.
 
Joined
Jul 14, 2020
Messages
7
A few things come back quite often. Most people agree that it's a bad thing to lend your knife to others, that it's okay to buy more than you actually need, that there's no ONE perfect knife and that cost doesn't equal quality.

I agree with all of those and most of the other stuff that has been said so far. Especially the "don't lend your knives" rule, most people aren't ready for that level of sharpness and just don't know how to use a knife, period.

A lesson I've learned recently is that expensive, "super steels" are still just steel. If you cut food on a ceramic dinner plate you're going to ruin your edge. If you cut dirty carpet, you're going to ruin your edge. If you accidentally hit the ground with your blade, you're going to ruin your edge. My point is, no matter what steel you have and no matter how much you paid for it, it's not a miracle material. People have crazy expectations because they paid crazy amounts. You will get a better steel if you pay more, but it's still just steel.

A lot of people abuse their knives. It's okay to test them for Youtube and go to extremes to see how much it can take, but prying open a car door with a folder is unrealistic and stupid. (I have yet to see someone actually expecting that from a knife, but you get the point)

The less expensive knives can and will do most jobs just fine. If you know the limitations of a knife you will work accordingly and use the proper technique. When you do that, you don't need a bomb proof piece of steel. I often find myself using my Moras and not needing more than that.

Steels are like Pokémon. There is no ONE perfect steel and all of them have strengths and weaknesses. Trying to find THE absolute best steel for everything is a total waste of time.

Sharpening isn't that easy, but is a necessary skill for any knife enthusiast. Learning how to do it properly is worth it.

I'm sure I'm forgetting a few things, but I guess I can just come back and write them later.
 

DMG

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2005
Messages
536
Don’t buy a camo knife.
Don’t set it down when you are done using it
Don’t let it get really dull. A regular touch-up on the sharpmaker beats a full sharpening
S30v is a great compromise between easy sharpening and edge holding
Carry a multitool or pry tool so you aren’t tempted to do something you shouldn’t
Spyderco warranty is barely a warranty when compared to ZT/BM/etc
 

Kaizen1

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2006
Messages
6,030
After all the threads, pictures, videos, reviews and participation in the knife community, don't lose track of the fact that any reasonable task you want to accomplish with a knife can be done with something that costs less than $30.
 

bucksway

Basic Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2007
Messages
4,042
When I was a young man having a knife with me saved my life or at the least a bad beating..and if you have your pants on you should have a knife in your pocket. I learned that from my 86 year old father in law who ALWAYS has one. Finally even 'pretty' or 'fancy' knives are still a tool and WILL cut stuff..
 
Top