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Titanium alloy ninja sword from the future

Discussion in 'Sword Discussion' started by Mecha, Jul 29, 2019.

  1. Allan DeGroot

    Allan DeGroot

    215
    Jun 15, 2019
    Then there is eliminating sand inclusions in the finished product, which is a major issue with cast iron-ware,if you have a glass range top which is a shatter hazard when heated, particularly if imbedded casting sand has scratched the range top, I have a glass range top in my kitchen, I bought it 20 years ago for my late mother, and I know some things about it now that I didn't know when I bought it as an Uber-expensive mother's day gift to replace the Range she had and openly despised at the time.

    One that there is still too much "hysteresis" in the temp adjustments, Two that it can be scratched, and third just how expensive it is to buy one, the prices have gotten worse, but hey, I could have spent even more on an inductive range top!

    Beware buying expensive gifts for senior citizen parents, endevour to buy them things you yourself won't mind getting as part of your Inheiretance!

    (At the risk of being too flippant) the 40" Samsung TV I bought her as another Mothers day gift is something I'm quite happy with, as I was paying her electric bills for her last five years and the Power that television saved, because she would leave it on 24/7, it was a gift to her that essentially paid for itself!

    Not quite as good a deal as I managed by getting rid of my 36" CRT Sony television, that sucked down 350Watts when it was turned off and 475W, when ON!

    BTW if you want to make a weapon with a handle that will gradually poison the wielder you can make it out of Bronze with as high a metallic arsenic as you can contrive to (5%-7%), Yes Arsenic is a toxin but as someone else CORRECTLY pointed out swallowing an entire bottle of Ibuprofen is more likely to kill you, then again Chugging an entire Liter of most spirit's on an empty stomach is equally likely to do the job..... or if you feel adventurous if you can aquire several Mercury cryogenic thermometers, these are not actually pure Mercury, but instead an amalgam of Mercury & Thallium and mix THAT into the alloy for your sword hilt!

    Compared to Thallium, I'd cheerfully stir my coffee for the next six months with an Arsenic spoon, than handle a Thallium alloy spoon ONCE without gloves
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
  2. Mecha

    Mecha Madscienceforge.com Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 27, 2013
    I would think that anybody who would use heavy, thick bronze cookware would insist on an open flame range. But I'm a bad cook so who knows.

    Thallium seems like a good choice for poisonous metal. Though I did just talk to a fellow who has large bricks of special lead he says came from a nuclear power plant. I asked if they were radioactive, and he said they had been "cleaned." Someone needs to come up with a Geiger counter app for smart phones. :D
     
  3. Allan DeGroot

    Allan DeGroot

    215
    Jun 15, 2019
    I didn't choose the house and there is no gas service here aside from propane, which would still freeze in the winter, and is enormously expensive. the house is electric, except for the oil fired hot water heat, which I rarely actually use.

    I don't have a Geiger counter, but I do have a radiac meter. frankly neutron radiation doesn't scare me as much as Gamma radiation. there isn't much in the human body that has much of a Neutron cross-section, but Gamma and X-rays are another matter.

    Shielding is a tricky thing, because any material heavy enough to slow down or stop "Radiation" has a tendency to re-radiate that energy in a more dangerous form.

    And this is allowing for the fact that higher energy neutrons can pass through a half a mile of lead as easily as a High velocity rifle bullet penetrates a single sheet of toilet tissue.
     
  4. Mecha

    Mecha Madscienceforge.com Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 27, 2013
    So you think radioactive/irradiated lead is a good choice? :p
     
    Rhinoknives1 likes this.
  5. Allan DeGroot

    Allan DeGroot

    215
    Jun 15, 2019
    Not really, I'd take it if it was offered for free or cheap, but I
    wouldn't use it for anything knife related.

    Usually for the serious demands of radiation shielding, lead is almost ideal as it is an efficient block to both gamma and X-rays, but for Particle radiation (neutron/proton) Nothing works particularly well. and for alpha particles a surprisingly thin layer of polyethylene stops >99% of them.

    So irradiated lead? I wouldn't stack the bricks under my bed, or under my living room sofa, but Ive got some things I'd stack them over.... I've got about 5 Kilos of Uranium tool bits. plus a couple hundred Thorium doped vintage Coleman mantles, as well as a couple of old aircraft clocks that have radium painted dials.

    all stuff I like having, but don't like having them close.... if you know what I mean

    BTW, on old military aircraft instruments or submarine gauges you may come across, judging if they are radioactive by weather or not they still glow is misleading (as well as WRONG and DANGEROUS)
    Because the Radium is still radioactive and likely will remain so for Centuries, but the "glow in the dark" phosphors used can be "burned out" by the continued exposure to the radiation, so some of these items are still quite dangerous and can remain so for as long as several thousand years. place a "glow-in-the-dark" item next to them in a dark place if your item starts to "glow in the dark", be Afraid. (this is a quick field test for the presence of Gamma or X-rays)

    My Casio watch has a "Glow in the Dial" dial and hands and leaving it face to face with a WW2 vintage aircraft clock for a few minutes makes it glow nearly as well as intentionally "CHARGING IT UP", with one of my LED UV flashlights Or my high powered Fluorescent UV "mineral lamp", you might consider this "test" method on those lead bricks... But do remember that the Radium in an old clock face is weight for weight some 3000 times more radioactive than Pure Uranium-235 (bomb or reactor fuel)
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
    Mecha likes this.
  6. Mecha

    Mecha Madscienceforge.com Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 27, 2013
    Great info, thanks for that!

    Otherwise, I'm sold: Uranium hilt parts are the answer.
     
  7. Allan DeGroot

    Allan DeGroot

    215
    Jun 15, 2019
    If you are hell bent on killing yourself, there are less complex ways..
     
  8. Mecha

    Mecha Madscienceforge.com Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 27, 2013

    It's not for me, it's for whoever ends up owning the sword. And after that, and after that, and on down the line until a long time from now when nobody even knows why it's poisonous. A cursed sword.
     
    WValtakis likes this.
  9. Mecha

    Mecha Madscienceforge.com Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 27, 2013
    Of course the initial owner will know about it, and maybe a few after that, but then the details will be lost to time.
     
    WValtakis likes this.
  10. Allan DeGroot

    Allan DeGroot

    215
    Jun 15, 2019
    Due to cost factors I'd still recommend Arsenical Bronze, then again there's
    Making an amalgam starting with Thallium-Mercury and use it for the eyes of a Snake head cast of arsenical bronze. Then you'd have a golden snake with silvery eyes that won't need to bite you to kill you!
     
    Mecha likes this.
  11. Mecha

    Mecha Madscienceforge.com Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 27, 2013

    Now you're talkin'! Thanks for the info, Mr. DeGroot. I have for a long time wanted to make a set of small swords that resemble large, long daggers, each one representing a poisonous snake: sea snake, cobra, coral snake, diamondback, etc. with scabbards that invoke the patterns of the snakes' skins. Perhaps each should have a different toxic substance used in the construction. If the cursed, poison sword(s) is (are) ever made, then consider yourself as an advisor. :D
     
    Rhinoknives1 and WValtakis like this.
  12. Allan DeGroot

    Allan DeGroot

    215
    Jun 15, 2019
    Well thallium behaves chemically a lot like it's lighter atomic analog Tin so it is miscible with a variety of metals that are commonly used in sword hilts, as is Arsenic but to be honest unless you suck on it like a baby's teething ring or have abnormally acidic sweat you won't be likely to absorb much arsenic.

    Incidental poisoning is at best unreliable, unless you have access to Organo-mercury compounds, or certain specific organo-phosphorous compounds, like some of the really nasty ones that can technically be described as Phosphorous-Cyanide compounds, these have shorthand names like Sarin ("GB") Tabun ("GA") or Soman ("GD") "VX". in short they are nerve agents.

    Some of these (Sarin) is volatile and can kill people in the same room with a single drop of the stuff.
    others are persistant(non volatile) and are a contact hazard 30mg will kill almost anyone within 10min or so of contact.
     
    Mecha likes this.
  13. Mecha

    Mecha Madscienceforge.com Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 27, 2013
    Ideally, I would be going for something that just makes one feel 'off' and maybe have a real effect over time and with touch (which was inspired by what I'd heard about the beryllium bronze), causing an instinctual avoidance of the blade and far off in the future draw comments like, "Don't touch that sword, it makes you sick, it's cursed."
     
    WValtakis likes this.
  14. Allan DeGroot

    Allan DeGroot

    215
    Jun 15, 2019
    The issue with Beryllium Bronze, is Inhaled Beryllium Oxide dust which can cause Chronic lung irritation, Which is known not to affect ALL people... But most people affected are those involved in Machining, polishing or refining Beryllium.
     
    Mecha likes this.
  15. Mecha

    Mecha Madscienceforge.com Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 27, 2013
    Well, damn. :(
     
  16. Rhinoknives1

    Rhinoknives1 KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 1, 2013
    I’m not Expert on the dangers of different Bronzes. I do know from Archeological excavations in Europe they were able to tell whom were the Copper/Bronze Smith’s & family by the Arsenic content in their bones.
     
    Mecha likes this.
  17. Allan DeGroot

    Allan DeGroot

    215
    Jun 15, 2019
    Just remember that Refined metallic Beryllium was entirely an outgrowth of the Cold War And nuclear Power industry, and was essentially unknown for other uses before the 1950's or 60's

    Even today most is used in spacecraft construction, (often alloyed with Titanium, Aluminum or Magnesium) which should be little surprise considering the typical cost of ~$1100/Kg.
     
    Mecha likes this.

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