Tmie for a new stop pin for my Sebenza?

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Nov 3, 1999
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Well, my large Sebenza might be in need of a new stop pin. I've had the knife a long time, and it's action gets cycled, many, many times a day. The lock bar is about 1/32" from the inside face of the side.

Has anyone here ever had their stop pin repalced for reasons explained above? Can I just call CRK for a slightly larger one? Or do I have to send my knife back for this repair?

Thanks in advance!

Barry H
 
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Have you dissasembled cleaned your knife and rotated the stop pin? Try that first. CRK can probably send you just a new stop pin.
 
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DaveH said:
Have you dissasembled cleaned your knife and rotated the stop pin? Try that first. CRK can probably send you just a new stop pin.

Well, rotating the stop pin has been discussed here before and I recall that CRK does not make a concentric pin for the Sebenza. Am I incorrect here?
If the stop pin is concentric, yes, I can see how rotating the pin might help.
Otherwise, all things being equal (so to speak) then rotating a round pin shouldn't affect the blade lock up.


:confused:

B.
 
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I have had a couple of sebs I bought used where the lockup was a little more then expected. Claening and reassembly fixed them, like I said try it first, before you go to the trouble of sending it in.
 
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Barry H said:
Well, rotating the stop pin has been discussed here before and I recall that CRK does not make a concentric pin for the Sebenza. Am I incorrect here?
If the stop pin is concentric, yes, I can see how rotating the pin might help.
Otherwise, all things being equal (so to speak) then rotating a round pin shouldn't affect the blade lock up.


:confused:

B.

It often does affect the distance the lockbar travels though. If a flat spot has been created on the stop pin then rotating to a new spot that hasn't been flattened will help.
 
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I recall somewhere Anne said that yes the pin is concentric and I also believe that she indicated that the stop pin rotation doesn't make a big difference. I agree with Dave, try reassembly first. I've had some that the blade goes way over but after a clean and lube they go back to normal. If that doesn't work I would send it back to CRK.:p
 

blackend

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Just curious Barry, what is the born date of your Seb? Is it a regular large or a Classic? Do you have a tendancy really squeeze hard on the lock side during usage or are you left handed with a right handed knife?
 

stjames

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What all the other wiseguys said, clean and reassemble that bad boy first.
 
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blackend said:
Just curious Barry, what is the born date of your Seb? Is it a regular large or a Classic? Do you have a tendancy really squeeze hard on the lock side during usage or are you left handed with a right handed knife?

It's a large Reg, but as for the date, I haven't a clue, as I bought it used without any certificate.

Lock engages almost all the way over without any hand pressure. I disassembles/assembled dozens of different Sebs, all with great results-- this one just seems like it time for a new pin.

Funny thing, I had just finished cleaning before the problem arose. I'll try reassembling with a little rotation on the stop pin and see what happens.

Thanks,
B.
 

blackend

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If the lock is moving over that far, then I doubt turning the stop pin sleeve will correct it. Being that you bought it second hand, it may have had some ware and tear already. I'd call the CR factory and ask their opinion. Mike Young is a good guy to talk to about it. He's the shop foreman. ;)
 

Professor

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and rotating it merely gives the opportunity to expose an unmarred section to the blade tang. Yes, if your stop pin is significantly dinged up, then this can make a difference, but very very marginal in my experience. But if yours is like mine, and it's been rotated with every disassembly, you might not have much unmarred area.

I discussed this very subject with Mr. Reeve over the phone one day several years ago. Replacing the stop pin with a slightly larger one in diameter would impact the angle that the lock face meets the blade tang ramp, and not in a good way. Rather a fresh new stop pin of stock diameter should bring your lockbar back to the left, unless you've experienced significant lock face wear.

The stop pin, screws, pivot bushings, etc are 303 stainless, which is relatively soft stainless steel as you know. If you've ever taken apart a peened stainless Spyderco model and drilled the handle to customize it, you know what I mean; it too is 303 if I recall correctly. My thinking is, though he did not say so, is that Mr. Reeve purposely made the stop pin from a very stainless, yet relatively soft material to "absorb the shock" of repeated openings to minimize the wear on the lock bar face. After all, it's a lot less expensive to replace that stop pin than a lock-side handle slab.

So, after that longwindedness, I'd say yes, try replacing your stop pin. They'll want you to send your Seb in, as I was recently told they want to fit the new stop pins in-house, which makes sense to me. If this does not significantly alter your lock travel, they'll probably call you about replacing the lock-side handle slab.

Professor.
 

stjames

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Scott Dog said:
I recall somewhere Anne said that yes the pin is concentric...

Scott has it right, the sleeve is concentric. But then Scott is almost always right, despite being left handed ;)
 
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No no....the sleeve is slightly egged shaped, no? Not perfectly round. Concentric means has a common center. I coulda sworn knives like the Spyderco military had an eccentric pivot pin. Thanks
 
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OK, you guys are driving me nuts - I know, short drive.

I KNOW the pin is concentric, but enough of this eccentric nonsense - I took the damn knife apart and looked: Yes (!), it is concentric.
 
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Thanks, took me a while to dig up the sebenza disassembled pictures. I think rotating it to a clean spot will do the trick, if it is in fact flat spotted. Solved the problem on a CRKT i had
 
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Professor said:
and rotating it merely gives the opportunity to expose an unmarred section to the blade tang. Yes, if your stop pin is significantly dinged up, then this can make a difference, but very very marginal in my experience. But if yours is like mine, and it's been rotated with every disassembly, you might not have much unmarred area.

I discussed this very subject with Mr. Reeve over the phone one day several years ago. Replacing the stop pin with a slightly larger one in diameter would impact the angle that the lock face meets the blade tang ramp, and not in a good way. Rather a fresh new stop pin of stock diameter should bring your lockbar back to the left, unless you've experienced significant lock face wear.

The stop pin, screws, pivot bushings, etc are 303 stainless, which is relatively soft stainless steel as you know. If you've ever taken apart a peened stainless Spyderco model and drilled the handle to customize it, you know what I mean; it too is 303 if I recall correctly. My thinking is, though he did not say so, is that Mr. Reeve purposely made the stop pin from a very stainless, yet relatively soft material to "absorb the shock" of repeated openings to minimize the wear on the lock bar face. After all, it's a lot less expensive to replace that stop pin than a lock-side handle slab.

So, after that longwindedness, I'd say yes, try replacing your stop pin. They'll want you to send your Seb in, as I was recently told they want to fit the new stop pins in-house, which makes sense to me. If this does not significantly alter your lock travel, they'll probably call you about replacing the lock-side handle slab.

Professor.

Just wanted you to know I appreciate that post.:thumbup:
I learnededed some stuff.:)

.
 
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Professor said:
and rotating it merely gives the opportunity to expose an unmarred section to the blade tang. Yes, if your stop pin is significantly dinged up, then this can make a difference, but very very marginal in my experience. But if yours is like mine, and it's been rotated with every disassembly, you might not have much unmarred area.

I discussed this very subject with Mr. Reeve over the phone one day several years ago. Replacing the stop pin with a slightly larger one in diameter would impact the angle that the lock face meets the blade tang ramp, and not in a good way. Rather a fresh new stop pin of stock diameter should bring your lockbar back to the left, unless you've experienced significant lock face wear.

The stop pin, screws, pivot bushings, etc are 303 stainless, which is relatively soft stainless steel as you know. If you've ever taken apart a peened stainless Spyderco model and drilled the handle to customize it, you know what I mean; it too is 303 if I recall correctly. My thinking is, though he did not say so, is that Mr. Reeve purposely made the stop pin from a very stainless, yet relatively soft material to "absorb the shock" of repeated openings to minimize the wear on the lock bar face. After all, it's a lot less expensive to replace that stop pin than a lock-side handle slab.

So, after that longwindedness, I'd say yes, try replacing your stop pin. They'll want you to send your Seb in, as I was recently told they want to fit the new stop pins in-house, which makes sense to me. If this does not significantly alter your lock travel, they'll probably call you about replacing the lock-side handle slab.

Professor.

Thanks for your post! Very informative..........

B/
 
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