Using the Tibetan sword

Discussion in 'H.I. Cantina' started by DannyinJapan, Jan 12, 2006.

  1. DannyinJapan

    DannyinJapan

    Oct 9, 2003
    Hell, it even makes ME laugh!
     
  2. captlid

    captlid

    284
    Feb 23, 2002
    :confused: If you want to take a guy's head off, don't you need to have some swing speed behind the blade to get through bone?
     
  3. DannyinJapan

    DannyinJapan

    Oct 9, 2003
    Why would you "Want" to do anything? If someone is trying to kill you, I would hope you could let go of desires and focus on survival.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2011
  4. captlid

    captlid

    284
    Feb 23, 2002
    To survive of course! :)

    Leaving a guy partially bleeding means he's still alive to kill you.
     
  5. DannyinJapan

    DannyinJapan

    Oct 9, 2003
    Partially bleeding? A severed jugular isn't what I'd call partial. But yes, he may still be dangerous. That's why you can't "want" anything or "expect" any outcomes. What if he has a neck guard on and your perfect cut just bounces off? You have to just keep going, staying safe no matter what...
     
  6. captlid

    captlid

    284
    Feb 23, 2002
    Now this is starting to sound like semantics. If some nutjob is swinging a sword at you or trying to cut you up into ribbons with a shank, you're gonna "try" to kill him.

    I just asked a clarifying question about what's the most reliable way to not get yourself killed!

    My question is, is the above enough to kill a man trying to kill you.

    Adrenaline has awesome effects on the human body.
     
  7. DannyinJapan

    DannyinJapan

    Oct 9, 2003
    It's not semantics. (really!) The purpose is survival. Whether or not the other guy is killed is irrelevant. I am trying to help you understand how to not get killed, but you keep asking about how to kill the other guy. These are not related subjects.
     
  8. Spectre

    Spectre

    Nov 3, 1998
    Our concious mind is not fast enough to cope with some situations. In those cases, one should clear one's mind totally. Wanting is an emotion, and holding onto it will hold you back. You have to be clear (mu) and just rely on your training.

    So train well.

    John
     
  9. captlid

    captlid

    284
    Feb 23, 2002
    I thought it was a desire? Or for purposes of combat desire and emotion are one and the same?
     
  10. Steely_Gunz

    Steely_Gunz Got the Khukuri fevah Moderator

    May 9, 2002
    Great to see you posting, Dave:)...sorry I'mma few days late:eek:

    I have not talked to Munk in some time, to answer your question. Last I heard, they were moving out of the Munk compound. Alas, we must now all find our OWN zombie uprising fortress of solitude.

    To the topic at hand, I really, really, really dig it when John and Danny start sharing some of their wealth of marital knowledge. It's like watching one of those movies where you THINK you might have your mind wrapped around the idea, but you dare not breathe a whisper lest it slip from your mental grasp. Carry on, good sirs:)
     
  11. DannyinJapan

    DannyinJapan

    Oct 9, 2003
    I am the LAST guy you should listen to about the "marital" arts.
     
  12. Abaniko

    Abaniko

    994
    Jun 2, 2006
    +2 :thumbup::thumbup:
     
  13. tedwca

    tedwca

    Dec 10, 2005
    ROTFLMAO

    I think that was a freudian slip on his part.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2011
  14. Steely_Gunz

    Steely_Gunz Got the Khukuri fevah Moderator

    May 9, 2002
    HA:p

    Freudian slip indeed:eek::p

    There are SO many ways to go with this, but I'm just gonna hush up and be a gentleman:D:thumbup:
     
  15. Spectre

    Spectre

    Nov 3, 1998
    captlid,

    Yes, for combat purposes, desires and emotions could be considered equivalent.

    It you try to let your conscious mind catch up during combat, you'll always be behind. I have seen chubby females whip out of the way of training swords swung at them so fast they blurred.

    We can't consciously think that fast. So we must train as "truly" as we can. And, in the moment of truth, we have to let everything go, everything we want and think we need, our desires, and our fears. Because we literally don't have time for them. If you want to not get cut (or shot, or hit), that will slow you down. If you want to kill your adversary, that will also impede you. You just have to be empty, blank, ready.

    I hope maybe now what Danny's saying makes more sense to you.

    John
     
  16. DannyinJapan

    DannyinJapan

    Oct 9, 2003
    We are creeping up on the real meaning of mushin.
     
  17. Steely_Gunz

    Steely_Gunz Got the Khukuri fevah Moderator

    May 9, 2002
    I had to google that one, but I think you're right.

    It's incredible what the body can do if we simply let go. I read an article about a guy that had damage to the part of his brain that interprets the visual information gathered by the eye and processes it as a mental image. In other words, his eyes and his brain were totally healthy and worked flawlessly. However he was "blind" simply because his brain couldn't form the picture he was seeing.

    However, he found out that his reflexes were just as keen. He played a bit of a game where he would have his buddies throw softballs at him (pretty hard), and he would dodge or block or even catch them from vital areas surprising amount of the time. Furthermore, his friends noticed that it they whipped one in there a little too fast where a normal person would scrunch up his face and except his fate, this guy would just move out of the way even faster or contort his body to avoid it.

    Pretty cool stuff, and this was a guy with no training. He was simply relying on instinct not to get hit, but because his brain lacked the function to form "softball", it treated every incoming object as life threatening. For all his brain and eyes cared, they could have been throwing trucks at him.
     
  18. captlid

    captlid

    284
    Feb 23, 2002
    Thanks, Spectre, now I got what Dannyinjapan is saying.

    It reminds me of that phenomena when catching baseballs coming at me [while squatting no less] at around 80-85 miles per hour and just "reflexively" knowing where the ball is going to go and catching it. :thumbup: :thumbup:
     
  19. DannyinJapan

    DannyinJapan

    Oct 9, 2003
    Here is a piece of my class notes from 2006:

    "It is really important to flow with the opponent as the fight continues. Don't try to "do" anything to him but do it with him. (natural, unforced movement) Never decide "ok, now I'm going to take him down." Keep changing, even if what you are doing seems to be working. Keep moving and changing and flowing without strength."
     
  20. JOE68

    JOE68

    130
    Jan 18, 2011
    I've been following along but I'm just seeking clarification.
    Are you saying that it is better to respond without "thinking" about it, as opposed to I'm going to do "this" technique?
     

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