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Wearing a large or long HI knife or sword

Discussion in 'Himalayan Imports' started by mtnfalcon, May 2, 2016.

  1. mtnfalcon

    mtnfalcon

    107
    Feb 24, 2006
    Who has found a comfortable method of wearing a large (15"+) HI knife in the bush?

    I love a practical, well-made piece of engineering marvel, like HI knives. So I've enjoyed collecting about two dozen. But I've only taken a few of them (my "users") on some big backcountry outings, and found that anything bigger than my 12" Balance was too heavy, and uncomfortable when worn on the left side of my belt, poking me in the lower ribs (especially with that brass metal cap on the sheath), or slapping against the side of my leg, or getting in the way like a bike's kickstand when sitting down, or gouging my left elbow as I walked with regular cadence (hiking poles solved that).

    So for those of you who have actually lived and breathed with these works of art at your side, have you found a way to wear them that works well for you?

    I've seen a picture or two of Gurkha in the Queen's service, with a BAS worn on the belt and riding in back.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    I suspect this is more ceremonial and looking cool, than it is functional.

    But I've also seen photos of it worn in front. If the Nepali have perfected this knife, I'm assuming this is the refined way to carry it too:
    [​IMG]

    If that is the best way, then I'll do it.

    Still, I'd like to find a way to wear the big knives, and my HI swords, high on the upper back, getting it out of the way, and making the weight easier to tolerate on the long hikes. But is that something only done in the movies and is not actually practical? I'm guessing that would make it rather hard to draw unless the handle were kept sticking up near a shoulder blade; even then, I'd probably slice my ear off drawing from that angle. Thoughts on sheaths/scabbards meant for wearing these on the back? Has anyone made or customized a HI sheath for back carry, or had a sling-like sword sheath made for back carry?
     
  2. kcwater

    kcwater

    338
    May 29, 2015
    I would recommend a dangler sheath that ties around your leg if you're going to have any type of backpack on

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N910A using Tapatalk
     
  3. ndoghouse

    ndoghouse Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 26, 2010
    Here is a dangler I had made for my KLVUK. I suppose you could put a leg strap on it as well for riding. It also has straps for baldric carry as well. Many options here but I mostly dangle it. It has plenty miles on it now but sure is working out great for me. Thanks to Pugs for his great craftsmanship!

    [​IMG]

    Here is another rig I gifted a friend for use while riding his motorcycle. The loop is placed at the hip so when you sit down or while riding it bends with your leg. It has a leg strap and is very comfortable. Its a bit shorter than what you want but this type of might work out well for you.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  4. SingleGrind

    SingleGrind

    894
    Jun 15, 2015
    I make kydex sheaths for my frequent-flyers. Some get a clip attachment, and some get loops to dangle slightly, but they are all worn at waist level on my left, since my IBBB is on the right. The key for me is angling the handle forward a bit. That keeps it out of the way of your hand, and if you get the angle right, it will bend with your stomach/side rather than jab into your ribs (if that makes sense).

    I may try a dangling right hand vertical setup like ndog shows with the KLVUK, but I dunno. I don't like things swinging on my waist, so I'd have to tie it to my leg, and then I don't like things tied to my leg haha if I do try it, I think it would be more proof of concept than anything else.

    I gotta take some pics of sheaths being worn. I don't have many of those
     
  5. DarthTaco123

    DarthTaco123

    Mar 28, 2013
    I usually hang the sheath from the side of my pack.
     
  6. Chandra

    Chandra

    18
    Mar 18, 2016
    Traditionally they are carried on the sash with the edge facing upwards (note the men on the left https://chinesemartialstudies.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/hill-types-of-nepal-kukri.jpg) and that's how I remember my grandpa wearing it as well. This is probably the best method since it allows the user to comfortably sit down/squat without having to adjust it and does not look/seem aggressive (with the edge facing downward, the tip sticks out when sitting down). Also the weight is not focused on the sides, making it comfortable to walk/run.
    I am currently living in the UK so it is illegal to carry it that way therefore when I go camping, I always keep them out of sight in my backpack along with any other tool with an edge. I prefer and recommend this method as it is safe and comfortable.
     
  7. Scara

    Scara

    Jun 21, 2014
    I personally prefer to carry it on my belt, but with the belt not threaded through the loops from the small of my back to my left hip so I can wear it on the small of the back, but if I sit I can move it to my hip. The small of the back method is actually more practical than it seems when using a traditional scabbard. There is a method of drawing from this position. You grab the handle, and twist the scabbard so the dropped portion of the spine is grounded against your body, probably your left cheek. Then you can draw it from the scabbard without cutting into the scabbard.
     
  8. Bigbore577

    Bigbore577

    Jun 15, 2006
    I'm really not trying to be humorous, obviously I'd fail once again. However, wearing a Khukri besides for parade in that rearward manner could be a real PITA, literally. I doubt besides the aforementioned, it wasn't common carry. Unless of course they never sat down without much difficulty. Looks great "10" practicallity "0".
     
  9. Scara

    Scara

    Jun 21, 2014
    If you watch videos of Gurkhas in WWII the small of the back carry is actually common, and you can see them draw from it too, using a variety of methods. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccGNe2zOZC4
     
  10. mtnfalcon

    mtnfalcon

    107
    Feb 24, 2006
    Thanks everyone. Really appreciate the pics, recommendations and different perspectives. Loving the dangler and the leg-strap sheaths, and the suggestion to secure it to the outside of the pack. Pugs is a leather artisan hrmmm... I'd love to make leather work my next obsession, but with a bevy of kids, it could be years before I get to it. Perhaps a PM to Pugs is in order. Now which knife will be my bestie...
     
  11. Bigbore577

    Bigbore577

    Jun 15, 2006
    Great training aid my friend Scara. It dispels my hypothesis but yet fortifies my grandfathers stories while sitting on his lap telling stories about his exploits in the trenches during WWI. He held the Ghurkas with the most highest of regards.
     
  12. Steely_Gunz

    Steely_Gunz Got the Khukuri fevah Moderator

    May 9, 2002
    I've found that while hiking, I simply don't need more than a 12" khuk. A 12" AK is perfect for my needs. I usually keep my camp blade, well, at camp:D
    I don't get out and hump it like I did when I was in my 20's. Life is too demanding. However, if I were to backpack into a location, I would probably lash it to the side of my pack or strap it across the top.
     
  13. Bawanna

    Bawanna Moderator Moderator

    Dec 19, 2012
    Where you been Steely? You been under the radar.................

    I found my little neglected Pen Knife pretty much up to my camping task. I too don't rough it much and now due to my transportation usually have a vehicle near by.

    But wood still needs to be cut, along with other task. My favorite of course was confirming that a Pen knife makes a fine pancake flipper.
     
  14. jsm11

    jsm11

    74
    Nov 5, 2014
    Why not consider the use of a duty belt, specifically worn outside a standard duty belt to provide support for the knife?

    Something like is used with pistols?
    http://m.galls.com/5-11-tactical-br...1x-8tbqBLV0Y4KsaRmrM45XgidHw1AObRYaAuN58P8HAQ

    I wear a standard duty belt and have considered the upgrade to a full external belt for hiking and support... a thick nylon webbed belt with velcro retention would be superb IMO
     
  15. Steely_Gunz

    Steely_Gunz Got the Khukuri fevah Moderator

    May 9, 2002
    Criminally AWOL:eek:
    My work load this time of year keeps me off the forum most of the day. I'm making a priority to make sure I peek in more often;)
     
  16. SingleGrind

    SingleGrind

    894
    Jun 15, 2015
    Alright, pic and video time!! Finally got off my lazy butt.

    First, simple pic of a bunch of the sheaths I've done for my HI knives. 12" BDC sheath fits snugly inside the nylon sheath it's sitting on, and is my go-to hiking knife, like Steely recommended.

    [​IMG]

    These are the "full sized" khukuri sheaths I've done so far

    [​IMG]

    Here's how the KLVUK sits, crossdraw

    [​IMG]

    And how the M-43 sits, also crossdraw

    [​IMG]

    And this is a little video I just did addressing some of the issues mentioned in the OP. I draw standing, crouch and sit to show how the knife moves rather than jabbing me in the ribs or being a "kickstand," and then draw from sitting just to show how easy it is.

    http://s1006.photobucket.com/user/S...ads/KVID1065_zps3lpokt9h.mp4.html?sort=3&o=10

    I then added a retention strap after cleaning/oiling the blade and realizing how quickly it releases from the sheath.

    [​IMG]

    I haven't had this blade long, but I've carried it for the entirety of 2 weekend up at the cabin and it had split firewood, been used to build an 18' long bridge, with the help of the KLVUK and a bow saw, and gone on hunting/scouting trips where I also carried an unslung air rifle. The KLVUK has had even more extensive use, and I can confidently say both sheath/carry styles work very well for me.
     
  17. jsm11

    jsm11

    74
    Nov 5, 2014
    Great pictures SingleGrind...

    I really like the Cross Draw setup on the M-43
     
  18. Bigbore577

    Bigbore577

    Jun 15, 2006
    SG, I really like the cross draw as well!!
     
  19. Dane M

    Dane M

    27
    May 8, 2016
    Is that clear kydex? Those are sweet. I'd love a clear kydex sheath for a kukri. I think it's a shame to hide away a beautiful blade in a black sheath. Is the clear any different for durability or anything?
     
  20. SingleGrind

    SingleGrind

    894
    Jun 15, 2015
    The clear stuff is a different brand of thermoplastic called Holstex, but it's basically the same as Kydex. Just brand names. I've heard the Holstex is supposed to be "more formable," or something like that, but I haven't noticed hardly any difference. The Holstex seems a little more prone to chipping around the egde, but I only say that because I bought b-stock that came with some chipped edges, I haven't experienced any chipping myself. So it seems to be as durable as the Kydex.

    Kydex also comes in all sorts of colors and patterns, as I'm sure Holstex and the other plastics do. I personally like the black for my stuff, with little exception, but if you'd like me to do any custom sheath work, the color choice is all you. They make Kryptek camo Kydex, which I've been meaning to get for a while. That stuff looks cool.

    Shoot me an email through the forum if you're interested!
     

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