What kind of folder do you carry?

TRfromMT

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The Lorien Lorien roundhouse in D2 today pulled duty on processing a couple turkeys. Boned out the legs and broke down the hip joints. No issues and remains sufficiently sharp.

Montana approved.
 

Lorien

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The Lorien Lorien roundhouse in D2 today pulled duty on processing a couple turkeys. Boned out the legs and broke down the hip joints. No issues and remains sufficiently sharp.

Montana approved.

I would love to read how you held it while using it for whatever things you were using it for. Any specific observations regarding the design, (I have no control over materials, production etc.)
 

TRfromMT

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Jan 4, 2016
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I would love to read how you held it while using it for whatever things you were using it for. Any specific observations regarding the design, (I have no control over materials, production etc.)

For the delicate work breasting out the bulk of the meat my index finger is along the spine, finger forward like a scalpel. This gives me lots of control to not perforate things. The breasts require slicing carefully between layers of meat and ribcage. It's awkward work because the bird wants to roll around. This knife is outstanding in this grip.

At joints, it's more of a ham-fisted, hammer grip. Separating the joints involves both cutting and lateral prying, heavy tendons against bone. The handle can be slick at this point so the handle shape is important to still provide a sure grip.

My hands were cold and stiff, with almost numb fingers (it was snowing and damp). Grip was never compromised.

I had the most trouble unlocking the lock after the job was done. Cold fingers and some lockstick didn't help. I actually had to find a stick to pry the lockbar back.

But I selected this knife specifically for the tough steel and the handle I had confidence using in cold, wet conditions.
 

Lorien

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Dec 5, 2005
Messages
20,650
For the delicate work breasting out the bulk of the meat my index finger is along the spine, finger forward like a scalpel. This gives me lots of control to not perforate things. The breasts require slicing carefully between layers of meat and ribcage. It's awkward work because the bird wants to roll around. This knife is outstanding in this grip.

At joints, it's more of a ham-fisted, hammer grip. Separating the joints involves both cutting and lateral prying, heavy tendons against bone. The handle can be slick at this point so the handle shape is important to still provide a sure grip.

My hands were cold and stiff, with almost numb fingers (it was snowing and damp). Grip was never compromised.

I had the most trouble unlocking the lock after the job was done. Cold fingers and some lockstick didn't help. I actually had to find a stick to pry the lockbar back.

But I selected this knife specifically for the tough steel and the handle I had confidence using in cold, wet conditions.

awesome, thank you!
 
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