52100 Para2

The Mastiff

Gold Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2006
Messages
5,399
I have used and collected knives since the late 60's. I've made a few, and sold a bunch as a side job on weekends. I will never understand the whole patina thing. It's just the opposite of what I want my knife to be and look like. Whatever wear and use does to them it does naturally and sure isn't forced. I put less time and work into my tool steel knives than many do "forcing a patina" and usually have them looking almost new. When scratched up they will eventually get a re satin but that isn't from corrosion. For those getting into the non stainless world don't think it's best to patina knives, and a lot of us don't think it looks good. Do whatever is right for you and definitely don't think patinas are necessary for non stainless knives.

joe
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2015
Messages
324
I have used and collected knives since the late 60's. I've made a few, and sold a bunch as a side job on weekends. I will never understand the whole patina thing. It's just the opposite of what I want my knife to be and look like. Whatever wear and use does to them it does naturally and sure isn't forced. I put less time and work into my tool steel knives than many do "forcing a patina" and usually have them looking almost new. When scratched up they will eventually get a re satin but that isn't from corrosion. For those getting into the non stainless world don't think it's best to patina knives, and a lot of us don't think it looks good. Do whatever is right for you and definitely don't think patinas are necessary for non stainless knives.

joe
Agree. I don't like to force much of anything unless I have to- knives or otherwise.
 
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Messages
421
I cannot find anything ugly or unpleasant looking here and yet they all seem to have some characteristic that diverges from what a lot of us might like.

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There are places, away from the internet, where seldom is heard a discouraging word. Find those places...and take your knife with you.
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jbmonkey

Supreme windbag
Platinum Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
12,669
I have used and collected knives since the late 60's. I've made a few, and sold a bunch as a side job on weekends. I will never understand the whole patina thing. It's just the opposite of what I want my knife to be and look like. Whatever wear and use does to them it does naturally and sure isn't forced. I put less time and work into my tool steel knives than many do "forcing a patina" and usually have them looking almost new. When scratched up they will eventually get a re satin but that isn't from corrosion. For those getting into the non stainless world don't think it's best to patina knives, and a lot of us don't think it looks good. Do whatever is right for you and definitely don't think patinas are necessary for non stainless knives.

joe
yep. what Joe said for me as well.
 

hhmoore

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Joined
Feb 7, 2014
Messages
9,073
I know there were some changes made to this one (though I can't seem to find the description of them at this time)...anybody know if aftermarket scales that fit other recent PM2s (s30v, S35vn, Cruwear, etc) will work on the 52100? I love the steel; but don't want to spend the money if the scale swap will require sending the knife out.
 

tyyreaun

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2017
Messages
2,798
I know there were some changes made to this one (though I can't seem to find the description of them at this time)...anybody know if aftermarket scales that fit other recent PM2s (s30v, S35vn, Cruwear, etc) will work on the 52100? I love the steel; but don't want to spend the money if the scale swap will require sending the knife out.

I'm using an RGT micarta scale set on my 52100 and it went on without any issues.
 
Joined
Jan 11, 2017
Messages
463
I have used and collected knives since the late 60's. I've made a few, and sold a bunch as a side job on weekends. I will never understand the whole patina thing. It's just the opposite of what I want my knife to be and look like. Whatever wear and use does to them it does naturally and sure isn't forced. I put less time and work into my tool steel knives than many do "forcing a patina" and usually have them looking almost new. When scratched up they will eventually get a re satin but that isn't from corrosion. For those getting into the non stainless world don't think it's best to patina knives, and a lot of us don't think it looks good. Do whatever is right for you and definitely don't think patinas are necessary for non stainless knives.

joe


That's fine. Here is my take on it.

If you use this type of steel in food prep, especially the 52100, and you don't oil it or patina it, you will taste that steel on what ever you are cutting. It doesn't take much. Cut something, let it sit for a minute, then make another cut. You will taste corrosion.

So, you can either oil it, which I'd rather not do as you can either taste the oil or it is not food safe. Or you can patina it.

All that said, I usually don't use non-stainless knives in food prep, unless I have to.
 
Joined
Jan 4, 2016
Messages
5,091
After a recent, large scale selloff for me to get a grail, I found myself with a few bucks leftover. One of the knives sold off was my last PM2, and I realize I just cannot be without one in my lineup. So I just made a deal on a LNIB 52100 CF PM2. I'm really looking forward to having this variant, and having a PM2 back in the EDC rotation!
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2012
Messages
514
Worry NOT my friends. Your warranty is unharmed by properly servicing your knife.
https://www.spyderco.com/service-support/warranty-repair/

Spyderco’s knives are assembled to exacting tolerances by trained technicians, so we discourage end users from disassembling or adjusting our knives. If a knife has been disassembled and reassembled correctly—so as to maintain its proper mechanical function—this warranty remains in full effect. However, if a knife has been disassembled and reassembled in such a way that, in Spyderco’s sole determination, the proper mechanical function of the knife has been compromised, it is no longer covered by warranty.

If you are going to apply a patina to the blade tang you should seal the face of the tang that makes contact with the PB bushings,inside the pivot hole, the detent ball track and the compression lock face. I use a Silver Sharpie. Its more like a paint than an ink and works pretty well for keeping the patina away from where you don't want it. Don't forget to soak the tang in alcohol and clean the paint off before reassembly.

I would also suggest polishing down the factory grind lines down to like a 220 grit satin. This allows your patina to coat the blade more smoothly and the reduces the roughness of the surface where red/rust can grow but leaves just enough surface texture to retain the gray, brown and black rust you want. Once you have a nice dark gray, brown and black patina, you'll need to seal the surface with oil. Massage it into the patina, just like you're spit shining shoes. You know it's coated well when your finger leaves streaks in the viscous coat without pulling oil from the blade onto your finger.
Thanks.
 

donscpoo

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2013
Messages
1,102
I did it with mustard and created the pattern by dapping the mustard. Have fun
 

TheFactor

Life is good !
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Joined
Feb 26, 2015
Messages
16,628
I have used and collected knives since the late 60's. I've made a few, and sold a bunch as a side job on weekends. I will never understand the whole patina thing. It's just the opposite of what I want my knife to be and look like. Whatever wear and use does to them it does naturally and sure isn't forced. I put less time and work into my tool steel knives than many do "forcing a patina" and usually have them looking almost new. When scratched up they will eventually get a re satin but that isn't from corrosion. For those getting into the non stainless world don't think it's best to patina knives, and a lot of us don't think it looks good. Do whatever is right for you and definitely don't think patinas are necessary for non stainless knives.

joe
It’s my understanding but correct me if I’m wrong but I thought patina is not only for a personal preference for looks but it also protects against rust and or pitting and further corrosion.
 
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