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A radical theory, and leaving the world of expensive modern knives behind

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by Chopaholic, Mar 6, 2019.

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  1. palonej

    palonej Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Aug 5, 2015
    You’re gonna tear a rotator cuff patting yourself on the back. Painful injury.......so maybe you should stop.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2019
    Pomsbz, Quiet, herisson and 9 others like this.
  2. marcinek

    marcinek

    Jan 9, 2007
    Again, than goodness you showed up to set us ignoramuses straight!
     
    James Y likes this.
  3. Chopaholic

    Chopaholic

    64
    Aug 20, 2018
    To prove that it can be done. I used the blade as a chisel, gently hitting the spine with a baton, to fell the tree. Then I carved some wedges and used them with the baton to split the entire tree into quarters. Then I chiseled the quarters just enough so that finished firewood sections could just be snapped off. The knife, an old Kershaw, don't even remember what model, was a little loose after but didn't break.

    The technique is much more efficient with a broader and longer blade, like one of the Old Hickories. With practice, a broad, thin blade used this way can process wood almost as fast as a chopping knife that weighs more than twice as much.
     
  4. betzner

    betzner CenCal Coast Platinum Member

    Jan 23, 2007
    I read the first page of this thread and wondered why anyone would bother trying to argue against the author's misunderstandings and misinterpretations of anything knife related. So I stopped reading. I mean, WHY BOTHER??

    Don't bother replying to me because I will never see this thread again. Enjoy.
     
  5. Landshark99

    Landshark99 Gold Member Gold Member

    193
    Jan 19, 2007
    I will have to disagree just a little I much prefer my Japanese kitchen knives in everything from blue or white steel to the exotic tool and super steels. I like their geometry much better than western knives for their cutting ability, and I do have an assortment of Chosera and Shapton water stones.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2019
  6. Chopaholic

    Chopaholic

    64
    Aug 20, 2018
    I've literally met maybe 2 people in real life who had ever sharpened anything, and I grew up in the country. At most, I'd occasionally see a cheap pull-through sharpener among the kit of one of my dad's hunting buddies. Sharpening is a lost art. Probably because modern knives are too thick to sharpen.
     
  7. jill jackson

    jill jackson

    Sep 5, 2006
    Nothing to argue about. I use many knives for different purposes. Just that one is good for kitchen preparation.
     
  8. jceckrosh

    jceckrosh KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Mar 2, 2016
    I'm using argument in the classic, rhetorical sense. Not to be confused with quarrel.
     
  9. katanas

    katanas

    Jan 6, 2012
    REALLY? :rolleyes: Even for an EXPERT? :eek:
     
  10. Chopaholic

    Chopaholic

    64
    Aug 20, 2018
    Maybe you could, but I wouldn't need the folding saw or a heavy, specialized shingling froe disguised as a knife. Just a tomahawk and a general purpose fixed blade that combined weigh 26 oz and cost $35.
     
  11. Chopaholic

    Chopaholic

    64
    Aug 20, 2018
    Hence "radical".
     
  12. jceckrosh

    jceckrosh KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Mar 2, 2016
    Excellent. Quit buying terrible knives you hate, and stick to what you like best. The problem you are encountering is expecting everyone to co-sign and not getting it. Or whatever you were expecting to get and not getting it.

    In response to the bold part: He might just be an idiot. "Avid chef" means nothing. Professional paid chef who works in a professional kitchen means more, but even that can mean very little.

    In response to the bold/underlined part: Wow.
     
    hexenjager likes this.
  13. 91bravo

    91bravo Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 29, 2008
    So it's a bet then with your axe/knife and my saw/knife? Document it on video...I'll do the same.
     
  14. jill jackson

    jill jackson

    Sep 5, 2006
    That knife I posted is a very old famous brand. That's why I bought it. Hard telling how old it is.
     
  15. Chopaholic

    Chopaholic

    64
    Aug 20, 2018
    Even among fellow butchers, they look at me like I have two heads when I start talking about "grits", bevels", "stropping", and so forth. There aren't very many people out there who know anything about sharpening. There are very many people out there who have closets full of dull knives that they think are cool.
     
  16. Chopaholic

    Chopaholic

    64
    Aug 20, 2018
    How about no, since I conceded that you very well may be faster. I just don't care because I am more concerned with overall practicality and versatility, among other things, in a wilderness kit, not just speed. A saw can only do one thing and is a royal pain the ass to sharpen; I've never been a big fan of them.
     
  17. microbe

    microbe

    437
    Apr 6, 2016
    In the old days, my grandfather used a type of hatchet like in the below picture, for light and medium wood cutting stuff. Plenty of heft for splitting wood without even using a baton. But, it was a work tool, and the heft of it would not make it suited for backpacking...
    [​IMG]
    Carrying a strong but lighter fixed blade, and using a disposable stick to add heft seems a viable solution to me.
     
  18. Insipid Moniker

    Insipid Moniker Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 28, 2011
    @Chopaholic I'm sure you've made a billion more cuts than any of us and have harvested more wood and done more things. Why don't you quiet down and go back to doing them all? That's a dear.
     
    danbot, Quiet, palonej and 5 others like this.
  19. Chopaholic

    Chopaholic

    64
    Aug 20, 2018
    The thanksgiving fellow was an example to demonstrate a characteristic I have observed in nearly everyone I've ever met who had any interest in edged tools. It's like they're missing a part of their brain that allows us to comprehend sharpness. A skillfully sharpened piece of mild steel can cut quite well, as I know from experience. A $3000 custom knife that has lost it's factory edge and hasn't been resharpened is useless. The vast majority of the cutting performance of any knife is in the sharpening job.
     
  20. Chopaholic

    Chopaholic

    64
    Aug 20, 2018
    There are some interesting "woods cleavers" from Italian companies like that on Baryonyx I want to check out.
     
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