Ask Toooj

Discussion in 'Ontario Knife Company' started by OntarioKnifeCompany, Apr 29, 2015.

  1. dingy

    dingy

    Feb 19, 2008
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    Hi toooj, the knives i striped are older , and the coated one is newly brought .
    the new SP10 (marked "ontario knife usa"on one side and "sp10 raider bowie" on the other side) has some diffrences from older one , How long has sp10 been changed ? and is it means the new sp10 is made of 1075 steel ?
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2018
  2. Mick P

    Mick P

    114
    Sep 23, 2014
    Yeah, I have been to the OKC page but there is, appearing on some other sites for bushcraft, the discrepancy. Thought I would ask the expert.
     
  3. Toooj

    Toooj

    920
    Aug 8, 2006
    PKJ,
    The Gen IIs may have started by water jet but in the end were processed by laser cutting 5160, heat treating in our factory and processed as standard Spec Plus knives...Having said that; we are constantly trying to improve our processes across our entire product lines.

    Mick P/Roguer,

    The Old Hick 7-7 Butcher is 0.083" thickness.

    Dingy,

    All of your SP-10s look to be legit.

    The New 10 may or may not be 1075. The Laser marking change was not initiated by the material change.

    Hope all of this helps.

    Best Regards,

    Paul Tsujimoto
    V.P. of Engineering
    Ontario Knife Company
     
  4. FOLDER FAN

    FOLDER FAN

    11
    Aug 15, 2018
    Hello Toooj,

    What type of Tang is the Mark 3 Dive Knife currently made with?

    I have searched around the web and found different answers.

    Frank Trazaska once wrote that the Mark 3 has a partial knife tang stub and a partial butt cap tang stub. Blade therefore is not connected to the butt cap. The original design called for a wire cutter to be mounted on the bottom of the sheath like the AKM bayonet. The interrupted design allows high voltage wires to be cut without transferring the electricity back to the butt cap. The cutter however was never adopted nor the pointed skull crusher.
    https://www.bladeforums.com/threads...l-partial-or-full-tang.1625359/#post-18568958



    Modifications were then made to the prototype knife that continue to this day with the addition of a steel butt, full through tang, black molded grip, and blackened stainless steel blade.
    http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/74936-usn-mk3-mod-o-issued-and-used/
     
    GIRLYmann likes this.
  5. longhunter1757

    longhunter1757

    3
    Jan 29, 2008
    Mr. Toooj,
    For my first post I have a question for the guru.
    My apologies if this has been asked before but a search showed no results.
    I'm asking about the RAT series being offered by Cabelas. For a time their website listed the RAT 5 as 1075 but nothing on the RAT 7. Now both show as 1095. Which is correct? I love the leather sheaths that come with them but can't decide between the RAT 7 or an RD 6 and would prefer 1095 on the RAT

    Thank you!
    Rich Baker
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2018
    buckfynn likes this.
  6. Roguer

    Roguer

    915
    Jan 5, 2015
    @longhunter1757 The RD6 is 5160 steel. Tooj announced the non military contract knives that were 1095 were switched to 1075 as it was deemed better overall for OKC and their customers as the knives had less breakage and such with 1075. The Spec II plus and every thing else that was 5160 will remain 5160.

    The RAT 7 offers a better ergonomic hilt that is larger than the RD6. But the RD6 blade will definitely out last the RAT7, in either 1095 or 1075. It probably would depend on how often you use your knife and you handle preference. I took a RAT 7 over the RAT 5, but for a dedicated heavy use and abuse tool would be the RD6 due to the 5160 blade, where the RAT7 would be more of a light to medium duty knife due to the FFG and steel. But it can step up and do such heavy jobs if needed. I put my 5160 steel Rangers through things that make 1095/1075 users cringe. But I admit the RD series could use a LONGER handle. So it would be down to your use of the knife and personal preference would be a deciding factor.

    I got both knives but the RD6 knife supply I got fluctuates as I give them to people as gifts who I know can count on that knife if their lives depend on it. (My definition of "light to Medium" seems to be other people's "Medium to Heavy" use, but what I mean by my use scale is constant use at a continuous usage for a long duration, not a "Few occasional use duties".)
     
    longhunter1757 likes this.
  7. longhunter1757

    longhunter1757

    3
    Jan 29, 2008
    @Rouger
    Thanks much for the explanation. I'm basically looking for an all around that I won't have to baby or worry about. Guess I can rule out the RAT 7 in 1095 if they were having that many problems. I just wish someone local had an RD6 I could grab so I could see what the grip is like. That shortness concerns me but hey, if I don't like it that is a valid excuse to buy another.
    Again, thanks much!
     
  8. buckfynn

    buckfynn

    545
    May 1, 2011
    I'd be interested in hearing a response from Toooj on this as well.
     
  9. Toooj

    Toooj

    920
    Aug 8, 2006
    Longhunter/buckfynn,

    Just as Roguer stated: 1075

    Folder Fan,

    Frank Trzaska is pretty spot on. There are a few things I'll argue with him about but he does his homework well.
    The Mark III Navy knife is as Frank states. But I'll elaborate a bit. The tang and pommel are not attached for the electrical insulation requirement. I hope you don't get the implication that the tang is short or weak because it is not full length.
    The tang goes back ...maybe 7/8 of the handle. While it is a "narrow" tang, it is fairly wide; certainly not a "stick" tang. The handle was originally a thermo setting plastic (for strength and electrical insulation purposes) that is insert molded directly onto the tang/blade. The material is now a glass filled PA that has high heat, shock and electrical resistance The handle has a cavity pocket on the end that the Pommel tang inserts into. The pommel is attached by a cross screw that secures it to the handle. The pommel and tang are separated by distance and the plastic handle material.
    The knife seems to be modeled after the Kalasnikov Bayonet including the wire cutter and blade tip. The original drawings have since eliminated the wire cutter arrangement on the hard sheath and the fragile knife tip has been modified to be stronger.

    Hope this helps.

    Best Regards,

    Paul Tsujimoto
    V.P. of engineering
    Ontario Knife Company
     
    FOLDER FAN and GIRLYmann like this.
  10. buckfynn

    buckfynn

    545
    May 1, 2011
    Toooj,

    The question that longhunter asked concerning the steel being used in the RAT5 and RAT7 being sold at Cabelas remains unanswered. Could you please clarify whether it is currently 1075 or 1095?

    Thanks,

    Buck Fynn

     
  11. Roguer

    Roguer

    915
    Jan 5, 2015
    Don't get me wrong the RAT 7 is a handy knife for general long term knife uses due to the handle, and the experts like Tooj explained the 1075 switch over and why it makes for a better steel for it for OKC to use. I kept my RAT 7 because the handle is addicting and got another one, plus using it for more than what it its intended to, I don't expect it to break. I was talking about heavy use and abuse that one normally don't do knife things with if one had to rely on it or use it as a tool due to your limited load out and its one of the few things you got. But normally I'm a 5160 steel addict and a RD Series of some sort always goes with me. Oops forgot to say the RAK in 1095 and 1075 I got and I have never seen any difference in performance in them, the RAK is a very over looked hidden GEM, but its big spike and shorter handle can put some people off.
     
    longhunter1757 likes this.
  12. longhunter1757

    longhunter1757

    3
    Jan 29, 2008
    Buck Fynn, he did answer. It's 1075.
     
    buckfynn likes this.
  13. buckfynn

    buckfynn

    545
    May 1, 2011
    Thanks somehow I must have missed it amongst all the other chatter.
     
    longhunter1757 likes this.
  14. dingy

    dingy

    Feb 19, 2008
    Hi Toooj.
    i bought a new sp10 few days ago from dealer , and this one comes a nylon sheath.
    is it made of 1075 steel ?
    thanks .
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    Last edited: Jan 14, 2019
  15. Toooj

    Toooj

    920
    Aug 8, 2006
    Dingy,

    Your pictures aren't posting. Once I see the SP-10 I can answer.

    Best Regards,

    Paul Tsujimoto
    V.P. of Engineering
    Ontario Knife Company
     
  16. dingy

    dingy

    Feb 19, 2008


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    how about this try?
    coated one with nylon sheath is the new one.
    thanks.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2019
    buckfynn likes this.
  17. Toooj

    Toooj

    920
    Aug 8, 2006
    Dingy,

    Thanks for the pics.
    Yes, the new SP-10 is made from 1075.
    Hope this helps.

    Best Regards,

    Paul Tsujimoto
    V.P. of Engineering
    Ontario Knife Company
     
  18. dingy

    dingy

    Feb 19, 2008
    thank you man.
    1075 (with lower carbon) steel sp10 is the very one i wanna have.
    i love tough steel chopper .
     
  19. dingy

    dingy

    Feb 19, 2008
    hi, toooj.
    this noon , i chopped cow leg bones with one of my sp10(1095 steel),and get a big wounds on the edge , looks like moon shape.
    i made photos use phone cam , what do you think on the wounds? is it normal ? is chopping frozen cow leg bones abuse for a chopper like sp10?

    i have other sp10s , and i will try the same thing in future. and i do not ask warranty for replacement ,cause this is a good chance to learn into blade philosophy, i did this and pay for it.



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  20. Toooj

    Toooj

    920
    Aug 8, 2006
    Dingy,

    Ouch! When chopping into anything with a knife, one has to be careful. Especially if the material is frozen. Material that can be potentially harder than the steel edge (or close to the same hardness) can destroy the edge and beyond. Even so called soft pine/fir wood has knots (filled with calcium carbonates). Kephardt, Kochanski, et al; have expounded on the issues with Juniper/Hemlock knots and destroyed edges on axes and knives.
    "Proper tool for the job" is a concept that is usually hard earned. Most butchers would use a band saw to cut thick cow shin bones.
    If you do change your mind and want a replacement, you can call or e-mail customer service.
    Hope this helps.
    Best Regards,

    Paul Tsujimoto
    V.P. of Engineering
    Ontario Knife Company
     

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