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Axe Head patterns for chopping

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by vcbvcbvcb, Dec 10, 2015.

  1. vcbvcbvcb

    vcbvcbvcb

    632
    Aug 1, 2012
    I followed a recommendation from a forum member to look at Puget sound patterns for chopping, and I understand why. However, double bit blades seem like an experts tool, which I am not. I see them rotate like an airplane propeller on utube vids. That would drive me nuts. What do you guys think of the Connecticut Pattern Axe Head for chopping as opposed to felling. I'll post some pictures in a little bit.
     
  2. Operator1975

    Operator1975 Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Sep 24, 2010
    Connecticut pattern is one of the best all around patterns out there, and will "chop" a log nicely.
     
  3. cityofthesouth

    cityofthesouth

    Jan 29, 2014
    Felling is chopping. What sort of wood processing do you have in mind?

    ETA: simultaneous posting.
     
  4. vcbvcbvcb

    vcbvcbvcb

    632
    Aug 1, 2012
    Bucking oak.
     
  5. vcbvcbvcb

    vcbvcbvcb

    632
    Aug 1, 2012
    My current options. Any thoughts on best one for bucking oak?

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  6. vcbvcbvcb

    vcbvcbvcb

    632
    Aug 1, 2012
    I pit captions on them but they didn't get there. The Legit. is 3 3/4 LBS. The other two are 4 LBS. The complete axe has a 35" handle.
     
  7. DarthTaco123

    DarthTaco123

    Mar 28, 2013
    I'd go for number one.
     
  8. Operator1975

    Operator1975 Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Sep 24, 2010
    I agree with this message
     
  9. vcbvcbvcb

    vcbvcbvcb

    632
    Aug 1, 2012
    So the chips on the edge are no biggie?
     
  10. vcbvcbvcb

    vcbvcbvcb

    632
    Aug 1, 2012
    By number 1 you mean the legit, right?
     
  11. Hacked

    Hacked

    947
    Jun 1, 2010
    The profile on the first one appears really nice, plus its not too heavy. The second one looks nice as well, while the last one looks like it may be a later model with a thicker profile and flat cheeks. I would probably go with one and or two. I don't see a reason not to bring/use more than one axe ;-)

    The chips in the bit can be filed out by running a bastard file along the edge before profiling and Sharpening. It's a shame about the heal and toe on that one, its a nice head.
     
  12. DarthTaco123

    DarthTaco123

    Mar 28, 2013
    I'd use the legitimus, so long as the chips were filed down and the axe was sharp.
     
  13. vcbvcbvcb

    vcbvcbvcb

    632
    Aug 1, 2012
    It's a shame about the heal and toe on that one, its a nice head.[/QUOTE]

    What's wrong with the heel and toe? Was it originally like the second head? It's a little late to take that into consideration, I done bought it. :thumbup:
     
  14. vcbvcbvcb

    vcbvcbvcb

    632
    Aug 1, 2012
    BTW, What pattern is it?
     
  15. DarthTaco123

    DarthTaco123

    Mar 28, 2013
    The top pattern is a Connecticut pattern, the other two look like Dayton patterns to me.
     
  16. Hacked

    Hacked

    947
    Jun 1, 2010
    The heal and toe are warn from use and sharpening, not uncommon at all with older axes. I wouldn't put to much thought into it. I agree with Darth, is a Connecticut pattern.
     
  17. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    We assume you mean to file them out before you use it - so no biggie. The Legitimus will have the best steel among those you posted so it will hold up to the oak better than the others. But I still think you'd be better off with a narrower bit in dry hard wood. Try to stay not more than 4" wide and still carry at least 3.5 pounds.
     
    Yankee Josh likes this.
  18. vcbvcbvcb

    vcbvcbvcb

    632
    Aug 1, 2012
    Your're no doubt correct. However, I EBay only had one Kentucky axe. It looked wider and had no brand. I looked for Couldn't find Carolina either. I really like the Puget Sound axes they're all double bit, which I'll do after a little more experience. The only other one that looked narrow to me was a serpentine pattern and I couldn't find one. Are there any other narrow choices?
     
  19. vcbvcbvcb

    vcbvcbvcb

    632
    Aug 1, 2012
    Square_peg. I'll be darned, I didn't notice how wide the bit was in the ad. I just looked at the heel and toe to see if they went much above the top and bottom of the head. I assumed that line made it narrow. In other words I looked at the profile instead of actually reading the width of the bit. It has the widest bit of any head I looked at. The best laid plan of mice and men... Oops!
     
  20. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    Yep. People love Connies for chopping green wood. Almost shaped like a racing axe. And easy to keep one point out of the wood to prevent binding. Just not the right axe for dry hardwood.

    Maine or Yankee patterns aren't too wide. Some Dayton's are narrower but my 4 pound has a 5" bit. Another option might be a pulaksi. Many of those have narrower bits. Undercutter axes have narrow bits but like pulaskis the extra point might bother you if double bits bother you.

    What about dulling one end of a PS falling axe?
     

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