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Cult of the peanut , members

Discussion in 'Traditional Folders and Fixed Blades' started by jacktrades_nbk, Mar 2, 2012.

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  1. FelineGirl

    FelineGirl

    214
    Jul 5, 2016
    I know what you mean. I got into slipjoints via modern folding knives. I'll always have a weakness for Spydercos, but my heart lies with traditional knives. I like many brands of traditionals, but Case is my go-to brand (and sometimes Buck). I love them. And the peanut is my favorite (closely followed by the canoe).


    Alex
     
  2. TrapperMike

    TrapperMike

    431
    Nov 23, 2016
    [emoji106]

    Sent from my E6782L using Tapatalk
     
  3. Captain O

    Captain O Banned BANNED

    Apr 14, 2015
    I have said it before, but it bears repeating. The Peanut is a "gentleman's knife". Quiet, subtle and unobtrusive, but a handy "pocket companion" that is there when needed. It render's "yeoman service" tackling work well out of proportion to it's size. After the task is completed, it slips into a warm pocket waiting to be called upon again.

    Blessings on the "lowly legume"... I do love it so! This little knife is truly one of "man's best friends".
     
  4. TrapperMike

    TrapperMike

    431
    Nov 23, 2016
    Amen![emoji41]

    Sent from my E6782L using Tapatalk
     
  5. greentrout

    greentrout

    663
    Apr 20, 2016
    [​IMG]
    Wife and daughter brought lunch to my office today. The little peanut came out of my pocket to cut dessert into toddler size bites for little bitty.
     
  6. deltaboy

    deltaboy

    Jul 6, 2014
    Peanuts are addictive.
     
  7. TrapperMike

    TrapperMike

    431
    Nov 23, 2016
    I realized what Carl has said about the peanut. Good for 90 percent of what we cut and make do on the other 10 percent. Yesterday I needed to cut a chunk of radiator hose off for a project. Really the peanut is probably a little small for this but I tried it. I had to go about it a different way then I'm used to but the peanut got the job done just fine. This was some of the good hi-miller hose but the peanut didn't care. This was one of those 10 percent situations for me.

    Sent from my E6782L using Tapatalk
     
  8. FelineGirl

    FelineGirl

    214
    Jul 5, 2016
    Yes, peanuts are very addictive! Yesterday my bermuda green bone peanut slipped out of my pocket, and I was quite upset about it. I couldn't find it anywhere. I finally decided to search my car, and luckily I found it under the seat. I have a Toyota Camry, and boy, modern cars don't make it easy at all to get my hand beneath the seat and find anything. I was so relieved I found it. I realized that I love every one of my peanuts. [emoji175] I would be lost without a peanut and a SAK.


    Alex
     
  9. jackknife

    jackknife Basic Member Basic Member

    Oct 2, 2004
    Alex, I have experienced the same problem with our Camry!!!:eek::eek:

    We bought a new camry in 2013, and love the car, but a couple times either Karen or I have dropped something down between the seat and center console, and have had a devil of a time finding it. Have to power the drivers seat up and back to see the cavity under it, and using my Fenix E01 has been a necessity. It's like a black hole under there! Like a passage to another dimension.

    It's the one thing about the car I ever curse Toyota on. It took over 15 minutes to find a lipstick tube Karen dropped and another time it took a good 10 to 15 minutes to find my Cross pen. :eek::eek:
     
  10. jackknife

    jackknife Basic Member Basic Member

    Oct 2, 2004
    I remember my dad responding to my question about the small size of his knife when I was a kid. He called it a 'mostly knife.' A small knife that disappears in the pocket but can handle most of what he needs a pocket knife for. Mostly.
     
  11. TrapperMike

    TrapperMike

    431
    Nov 23, 2016
    So far it has handled mostly what I need it for. I remember my grandpa always had a small pocket knife. I wish I remember what it was. A 3 to 3 1/4 pen or stockman knife. Growing up on the farm with him he never complained about his knife being to small. If he needed a big knife he had a buck 119. He was one of those right tool for the job kind of guy. Your stories remind me of him and the things he taught me.

    Sent from my E6782L using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2017
  12. TedderX

    TedderX

    185
    Feb 8, 2017
    What is the fascination with peanuts and/or pocketknives smaller than a 3" handle?

    I really feel they're so small I can't get a good drip on them and even unsafe when opening/closing. It almost seems like too small of blades to even cut things with (even something simple like an apple).

    Enlighten me.
     
  13. Captain O

    Captain O Banned BANNED

    Apr 14, 2015
    It is difficult for people with large hands to use a Peanut. For these men (and some women) a large Jack might be in order. The Peanut has a great tendency to "disappear" into a gentleman's pocket and to appear when it is necessary. It isn't for everyone, but most men dress in slacks and appreciate the way it fits into their wardrobe. Mine rides in a sportcoat pocket, and it's 1095 CV blade holds a razor's edge, serving me "on demand". I carry 3 knives including my Queen Barlow Red Bone scaled knife.

    If I head into the city, I'll conceal my Schrade/Taylor "Old Timer" Boot Knife where it can "save my skin" if need be.
     
  14. TrapperMike

    TrapperMike

    431
    Nov 23, 2016
    I like the size because it is very easy to carry. The peanut for its size cuts big. Don't let its size fool you. All I can say is try one for awhile. If you dont care for it thats ok. Different strokes for different folks.

    Sent from my E6782L using Tapatalk
     
  15. rishma

    rishma

    753
    Jun 22, 2008
    Honestly, I thought exactly the same thing. And still I think food prep is the one area that the peanut sometimes does not Excel. What I found is the vast majority of my cutting tasks are handled just fine by the very sharp thin blades of my case peanut. When the blades are sharp and thin, I find no reason to bear down on the handle to make a cut, even if the material is substantial. It's not to say that larger knife might not do better sometimes, it's just that those occasions are not very often for me. There are trade-offs. The peanut is so very comfortable to carry and handles 90% of my cutting needs perfectly. The comfort of this small knife in my pocket is worth the occasional extra effort to use a small knife for a big task. Mostly I find myself impressed with its ability to handle larger tasks.

    When I'm off in the woods or engaging in work I know will require a big knife, I also carry a larger folder or fixed. It could be that your lifestyle truly demands a larger knife. Even though I thought this was true for me, I learned otherwise.

    I'm not sure I've made a compelling argument. However, I think you'll be pleasantly surprised if you decide to carry a peanut only for a couple weeks.
     
  16. fishcakes

    fishcakes

    313
    Apr 18, 2015
    Honestly, its because im a smaller guy. I can handle bigger knives, sure. But when a knife blade gets to be any bigger than around 3 1/2 inches, i have a hard time controlling my cuts. I also have some problems with my hands(arthritis and carpal tunnel) and the peanut doesnt fatigue my hand like aome of the larger slipjoints would.

    [​IMG]
    Told ya my hands were small:D
     
  17. JofAllTrades

    JofAllTrades

    65
    Jul 19, 2014
    As has been mentioned on here a time or two, it may have something to do with "maximum minimalism" and our seemingly ever-enamored state with the concept.

    To be sure, I've learned quite a bit about how to get by with less, and the Peanut was like the key to the metaphorical door. Many of the stories that Carl has written have shown of the virtues of a good, sharp pocket knife that is ALWAYS on you(baring special circumstance, of course).

    The Peanut is merely the metaphor used... a classic design of basic materials in a world of ever-improving materials and complex designs. A lesson that many have forgotten through the years.

    The lesson that, most times, you don't need nearly as much as you think to get by, and get by pretty well at that.

    At least... that's what I've taken from it.

    Cheers!
     
  18. FelineGirl

    FelineGirl

    214
    Jul 5, 2016
    Fishcakes, I am an admirer of hands, and your hands are quite lovely, I must say. And that peanut is rather fine, as well.

    For a long while I resisted using my peanuts. I had a couple of them but didn't really use them. And then, after having read many of Jackknife's tales, I decided to start putting a peanut in my pocket every day. I continued to doubt the peanut for a while, but suddenly last summer, the peanut really clicked with me. I totally understood it. And yes, for me it covers about 90% of my knife needs. I've mentioned this before, but I'll say it again. I'm far from being a tiny woman. I'm 6 feet 2 inches tall and 145 lbs. Very tall and thin with large hands and slender fingers. I wear a men's large size glove. My hands are larger than the hands of some men out there. And the peanut works beautifully in my hands. I recommend giving the peanut a try to anyone! For me, a large knife cuts no better than a peanut and is often overkill and more difficult to control for certain tasks. I now like to use the smallest knife I can for most tasks. I absolutely cannot believe I used to carry a Spyderco Endura. A nice knife, to be sure, but overkill for my daily urban needs.


    Alex
     
  19. fishcakes

    fishcakes

    313
    Apr 18, 2015
    Thank you. First time theyve ever been called lovely. Theyre usually stained from work but this weeks been pretty easy on me. Ive spent the last 10 years or so crushing, cutting, hitting, pinching and breaking them.

    This particular nut was a gift from my girlfriend this past christmas, so its extra special. Hasnt been a day it hasnt been in my pocket. The best part is that case did an exceptiinal job with this one, blades centered, even grinds. I couldnt have picked out a better one myself.

    I hear you on the large knife front. I can comfortably use my sak hiker, but thats about the limit for me. I think the peanut does so well too because of the serpintine shape. It nestles right into your palm and just feels well "right" for lack of a better word.
     
  20. jackknife

    jackknife Basic Member Basic Member

    Oct 2, 2004
    In the end, it's about overkill, or lack of. In this day and age, pocket space is sometimes at a premium. Cell phone, car keys/key ring, little bottle of hand sanitizer, arthritis pain meds, pen/pencil, bandana, small flashlight, RONCO pocket defibrillator in case of vapor lock, whatever. The compact little peanut drops in to the bottom of a pocket and goes un-noticed until needed. One of the truest things my old man ever told me was, a pocket knife is something that is carried a lot, but used only once in a while. In todays mostly urban environment, there's not really a lot of need for much knife. In fact, millions of people go without any knife everyday. Others, choose a knife like the little Victorinox classic. The classic makes the peanut look like a large knife by comparison, yet if we look at the production numbers the Vic classic is the most produced pocket knife in the world. Over 9 million of them are sold every year, and that's many times the total number of the second and third largest knife companies in the world combined.

    So, why the peanut?

    For me, the peanut is personal. I just happen to grow up with a man who used a Case peanut for his everyday pocket knife. But in general, the peanut size of knife was the pocket knife of the era that I grew up in. Those days, every man who had pants on had a pocket knife in a pocket somewhere. And it was almost always a small, 3 inch or less two blade jack or pen. Sometimes it was one of those cracked ice celluloid low cost jobs found at the cardboard display near the cash register at the five and dime, or it may have been a real Case, Boker, Schrade, or Camillus. But they were all a small two blade. The basic reason was, people needed a pocketknife, but they didn't need much more than a few inches of blade, if that. They carried as much knife as was needed to open mail, cut string, open a box, gut a fish, whittle a hot dog stick for your kid. Small jacks and pen knives were enough to get the job done, and un-noticed when not needed. The buck 110 had been invented yet. The age of over size had not happened yet.

    There were other slightly larger knives if you needed more knife or handle to hang onto. Barlow, stockman, and toothpicks were longer, and had handles that could be grabbed with work gloves on. But for the most part in urban areas, the small 3 inch and under knife was ubiquitous. Today, life is still pretty much the same. Life has a habit of filling our pockets with stuff. A small unobtrusive little cutting tool that goes un-noticed yet packs enough cutting ability to do most of the jobs it will be used for can be a good thing. I myself love the concept of small and effective. An outlook of maximum minimalism is a hold over from my ultra light backpacking days and travel by motorcycle where you couldn't carry anything that didn't fit in your pockets or saddlebags. I always went for the smallest tool that would function at it's intended task. Monoculars instead of binoculars, mini .22 revolvers, peanut size knives. It's more about what you really don't need, and being liberated by downsizing.

    Maybe it's like appreciation of a good scotch, an acquired taste. Peanuts are not for everyone. But you'll never know if you don't try one.

    Any of these small blades has proven to be enough for my mostly urban life in Georgetown Texas. The Remington peanut by Camillus feels great in the hand.
    [​IMG]

    If I go off in the woods, or fishing, my sheath knife goes on my hip. It augments my legume for heavy duty stuff.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2017

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