Filipino vs Apache?

Discussion in 'Filipino Combat Arts Forum' started by apache_tom, Mar 27, 2007.

  1. Yoshi

    Yoshi Banned BANNED

    408
    Oct 31, 2004
    I would be suprised if there was any truly original Philippino techniques left, as most area's in the Philippines have had influences from other cultures at some time.
     
  2. FilAm2007

    FilAm2007 Banned by Moderators Banned

    90
    Apr 17, 2007
    Back that shit up armbreaker! Provide me with the research that says it is fact.I bet you can't come up with any proof.Only hearsay.Just because you heard it form a famous master, it doesn't make it a fact.Information gets twisted along the the way.You are correct Guro Mike.Certain parts of the P.I. were not conquered thanks to their great FMA skills.
     
  3. Triton

    Triton Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 8, 2000
    I'd thought I read that the Bowie brothers may have learned whatever they knew during time in New Orleans? There were several schools that taught fencing, knife fighting and the use of dueling pistols if I remember correctly.
     
  4. armbreaker 69

    armbreaker 69

    148
    Apr 23, 2007
    Talk to Dwight McLemore (sp?) about the Bowie knife. He is a very knowledgable teacher of the Bowie knife. I actually have one of his old videos on the subject. He is in the other part of this forum, practical tactical. He is a great guy to talk to as well.
     
  5. armbreaker 69

    armbreaker 69

    148
    Apr 23, 2007
    Filam, nothing against the Filipines or anything like that, so don't go crazy, but basically the only part of the Filipines that was'nt conquered was the sothern most area where the Muslims are. Even the Filipine military these days doesn't like to go there. Other then that, the Filipines was basically at one time controled by anyother country. Japan practically ruled the Filipines at one time remember, and the the western alliance during WW2 saved them, they by no means were able to do it on their own.

    Spain ran the Filipines at one time as well. Espada e Daga is pure Spanish, stick and dager. Everything about it is spanish. Not all, but quite alot of your Filipino last names are Spanish. Your own last name is Spanish. This is all in the past and history now, things are different now. Things like this happened all over the world, the Filipines are not exempt.
     
  6. edge_fighter

    edge_fighter

    97
    Apr 19, 2007
    So you're saying 69, that the Southern Filipinos were not influenced by the Spaniards. Did you know some of the deadliest knife fighters in the P.I. are Southeners? They invented and refined their skills themselves. They might've been influenced by foreigners in a way, as they were probably trying to find better ways to kill them.
     
  7. armbreaker 69

    armbreaker 69

    148
    Apr 23, 2007
    Hey edge fighter, I highly doubt the southerners invented all their skills themselves? Refine maybe, but totally invent no.
     
  8. saint o'killers

    saint o'killers

    Jul 20, 2001
    the only influence that i know of that were adapted by Moros from the Spaniards were the helms and armours...they copied them, but they sometimes used leather and ox horns for plated armors. but i think that's about it...i know they already had small cannons available, too.
     
  9. Foleycath.

    Foleycath. Banned by Moderators Banned

    21
    Apr 26, 2007
    Hello, I am new to the forums and heard from a friend that this a wonderful place to discuss the FMA.Sorry armbreaker69,but if you have really done your research, you will see that not all Filipinos have Spanish last names.Some have Chinese names.If you are going to make a personal attack on a culture and their arts, please be so kind to learn the correct spelling.For example Philippines, not Filipines.Just my two cents.Mr. Saint O'Killer( I love that name by the way), I have enjoyed your posts.You really seem to have a wealth of knowledge in the arts. What again is your background?
     
  10. armbreaker 69

    armbreaker 69

    148
    Apr 23, 2007
    Hey folycath, I was'nt attacking anyones culture. As a matter of fact, the 2 people that talked me into joining this forum are both FILIPINO . And I see it spelt that way quite often. Its easier. You don't like it, oh well.

    I never said all Filipinos have Spanish names, I said most. And even if I was wrong, all the FILIPINOS I know have spanish last names. One way I know this, we have some Hispanic people that work for our company. One day some of them were asking me about martial arts, and they seen my new kali sticks in my car. We got to talking, and they were even saying how alot of FILIPINOS have the same last names they do. And how both cultures are having their parades together in Chicago. This is not new news, it was on t.v. And my FILIPINO friends are not only fully aware of it, but I've heard them talk about it.

    As a matter of fact, I was told by my FILIPNO friends and an old teacher of mine that most FILIPNOS these days are a mixture of various ethnic groups anyway. What is wrong with that anyway. You act as if its a bad thing. You should'nt have a problem with that. Some of the prettiest girls out there are Hispanic. I used to know one pretty Filipino girl once, she worked at Hooters, in Downers Grove, Illinois. Her name was Lucy. If Filam was around he knows who I'm talking about. Edge Fighter might to, although he goes both ways I heard. Maybe he did'nt notice.
     
  11. Foleycath.

    Foleycath. Banned by Moderators Banned

    21
    Apr 26, 2007
    Excuse me! I have a lot of Filpino friends too and that's not how they spell it.Hispanic??????? I'm sorry,but Filipinos although at one time were under Spanish rule are not under Hispanics.No offense to Hispanics.
    Hooters! I never go there.Not interested.
    Love that picture Mr.Saint O'Killer. Is that you??? You look delicious!
    Anyways, from what I have researched FMA techniques, especially the blade, are time tested and original to the people and their country.
     
  12. armbreaker 69

    armbreaker 69

    148
    Apr 23, 2007
    Sorry Mr. Folycath, or maybe I should say Mrs., but you need to pull your head out of your ass. Your spelling Filipino they way you just told me not to. LOL. I never said the Filipinos were ruled by Hispancis. LOL. I was talking about last names. You newbies.
     
  13. Foleycath.

    Foleycath. Banned by Moderators Banned

    21
    Apr 26, 2007
    Mr.? Mrs.?I haven't decided yet. Going through some changes.But that's not the issue here.Sorry, again but I have a Filipino friend whose last name is Chong? Does that sound Filipino to you?
     
  14. armbreaker 69

    armbreaker 69

    148
    Apr 23, 2007
    Hey Mr. or Mrs. Folycath, your still spelling Filipino the way you just told me not to.LOL. You do'nt know any Filipino guys named Chong either .LOL. Sounds made up.
     
  15. Foleycath.

    Foleycath. Banned by Moderators Banned

    21
    Apr 26, 2007
    O.K. I give up! You win honey! I did not join this forum to debate semantics.Let's talk martial arts shall we.
     
  16. armbreaker 69

    armbreaker 69

    148
    Apr 23, 2007
    LOL. Honey?????? Guru Mike is your honey. I'm armbreaker.
     
  17. edge_fighter

    edge_fighter

    97
    Apr 19, 2007
    Whatever.

    Back to the knife thing. You said the Southern P.I. was not conquered by any country. That they're independence has stood the test of time against many foreign invaders, including Spaniards. Right? Then, who invented their knife system used to defend themselves in the first place? Freaking aliens ?!!

    Think!

    The logical conclusion is the Southern Filipinos had invented a knife system that works. How hard is that to understand? They made it happen and they developed a terribly vicious fighting art. There combat skill was paid by the blood of their warriors. And if their fighting system didn't work, they would've been taken over.

    Like Mike said, after awhile they were bound to incorporate similar defenses as their enemies, namely armor. And like I said, they were probably influenced by their enemies in terms of finding more effective ways to kill them all. Their roots originated within the confines of their land.
     
  18. AF1

    AF1

    274
    Apr 4, 2005
    And while some things would be easy to imitate and copy from the enemy (like the idea of armor) others wouldn't be so easy--like a complete fighting style.

    It would be damn hard to steal an entire system from scratch, just by watching.
     
  19. edge_fighter

    edge_fighter

    97
    Apr 19, 2007
    I looked up Southern Filipino martial arts and found this well-written article by Master Buot a teacher of Balintawak.

    Eskrima

    Source
    SAM L. BUOT, Sr., Phoenix Arizona

    In a polyglot archipelago like the Philippines, eskrima was known as pagkalikali, panandata, didya, kabaroan, kaliradman and sinawali and arnis or arnis de mano in Luzon. It was also known as eskrima, olisi, garote or baston in the Visayas and kali, kalirongan, kuntao or silat in Mindanao. It was also known as gilas in pre-Spanish Philippines. The author uses Cebuano terms for forms and techniques. The Philippines has 87 languages and dialects, 16 of which are major languages, thus words and terms vary from province to province. This is explained by the fact that there are over 7100 islands spread over the archipelago further broken up by the mountains and natural boundaries. Tribes and kingdoms, sometimes warring, further isolated them from each other. There was no national identity until the islands was consolidated by the Spanish invaders. Thus, development of a national language did not happen until the last fifty or so years.

    The art is indigenous to the Philippines, developed and practiced for centuries, although until lately, has hardly been known outside the country. It probably started when early Filipinos discovered rattan (a long, tough vine, cut into convenient lengths), could be used as a good striking weapon. Sometimes, Philippine hardwood, bahiĀ’ was used, after it was cured and carved into a heavy, hard and sturdy weapon. Eskrima was very popular with the Maharlika or royal blood. It was also practiced by the common folk. It was both a game, sport, physical exercise and an art of self-defense.
     
  20. Pahtoocara

    Pahtoocara

    Feb 9, 2006
    This is false.
     

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