Guardians of The Lambsfoot!

scrteened porch

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Feb 19, 2012
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10,197
"What is this? This is a pen."
oT61q1O.jpg


"The pen of my aunt is large!"
l2rDN9F.jpg
 
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Old Traf

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Jun 1, 2013
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173
A beautiful knife to be sure, but I wanted to thank you especially for the picture of the snow drops. The flowers brought back memories of days long gone when I bought the first little bunch of snow drops for my mom, I must've been 5 or six years old.
Unfortunately they don't grow in SoCal though i tried several times with bulbs from Netherlands. So, thank you Jack Black Jack Black for a beautiful picture. Stay safe, stay healthy.

We have the same problem here in Florida. Most bulbs need a freeze to bloom in subsequent years. There are two ways around the problem. Treat them as annuals and buy and plant new ones, or keep them at the proper temperature in a fridge or freezer.

-Mel
 

brewbear

Basic Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2019
Messages
355
We have the same problem here in Florida. Most bulbs need a freeze to bloom in subsequent years. There are two ways around the problem. Treat them as annuals and buy and plant new ones, or keep them at the proper temperature in a fridge or freezer.

-Mel
Thank you for the advice Mel, I will try that (refrigerate them). I fortunately found a few bushes of mock orange (after 10 years searching) she (and my wife) love so I planted one each for mom, wife and mother in law.
Getting back on track, this little guy was waiting for me today
20210210-170744.jpg
 
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Jack Black

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Joined
Dec 2, 2005
Messages
44,432
"What is this? This is a pen."
oT61q1O.jpg


"The pen of my aunt is large!"
l2rDN9F.jpg

I wonder how many long hours we wasted learning phrases in relation to stationery items?! :rolleyes: Even after living and working (teaching English) in France, and having travelled there extensively, there are some I've never had a chance to use o_O :rolleyes: :D :thumbsup:

His English accent in Spanish is VERY THICK :D
I can barely understand him but he sounds hilarious :thumbsup::D

I much prefer the original, but it's quite a funny film - certainly Liz Hurley's best :rolleyes: :D :thumbsup:


I’m pretty sure I never posted this here. I also went to the index to check out the maker, but didn’t see it.
I had always thought it said Vulcan, but I could be wrong.
VULCAN
T. ELLIN & Co
SHEFFIELD
View attachment 1507655

That's a nice old one Mike :) Unfortunately, the thread index only covers the first few hundred pages of this thread, but 'Vulcan' was the the main trademark of Thomas Ellin & Co, after the Roman God, who is associated with Sheffield, featuring on the city crest, (along with Thor), with a statue surmounting Sheffield Town Hall. The statue was damaged slightly by the Luftwaffe during the Sheffield Blitz of World War 2. The author and painter George Cummings tells a comical story about how, also during WW2, a large group of women 'Buffer Girls' took advantage of a telescope, placed on the steps of the nearby City Hall, to check out Vulcan's anatomy :eek: :rolleyes:

42369533.jpg


Thomas Ellin (1771-1845) was the eldest of four brothers, who went into the cutlery trade as apprentices. After completing his apprenticeship, became a partner with Joseph Oldale, a table knife manufacturer, marrying his daughter Ann. In 1810, the firm rented a wheel on the River Porter, where later, they were reputed to be the first Sheffield cutlery works to use steam power.

By 1821, the firm was trading as Thomas Ellin & Co, with a new partner, cutler Edward Ingall. They continued to expand, and Thomas Ellin became Master Cutler in 1833, a position later held by his eldest son, Thomas Ellin II (1799-1847).

By 1881, the company employed 150 workers, making pen and pocket knives, Bowies, hunting knives, trade knives, and table cutlery. It remained in family hands until the retirement of Arthur William Ellin (1877-1961) in 1934. Joseph Elliot & Sons subsequently took over both the Ellin marks, and their factory, and Thomas Ellin & Co was formally dissolved in 1980.

y11909.jpg


Thank you for the advice Mel, I will try that (refrigerate them). I fortunately found a few bushes of mock orange (after 10 years searching) she (and my wife) love so I planted one each for mom, wife and mother in law.
Getting back on track, this little guy was waiting for me today
20210210-170744.jpg

That Spalted Maple looks good :) :thumbsup:

Good morning Guardians, we've made it through another week! :rolleyes: Hope everyone is doing OK, and looking forward to the weekend. Nothing much to do here I'm afraid, as we are still in lockdown, but I might have a walk up to the post office this afternoon, and even further afield to buy some bread tomorrow :rolleyes: :thumbsup:

Carrying an Old Friend today - Lucy :) Have a good day Guardians :thumbsup:

8BDrMVa.jpg
 

Onebigbill

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Joined
May 21, 2019
Messages
2,364
I wonder how many long hours we wasted learning phrases in relation to stationery items?! :rolleyes: Even after living and working (teaching English) in France, and having travelled there extensively, there are some I've never had a chance to use o_O :rolleyes: :D :thumbsup:



I much prefer the original, but it's quite a funny film - certainly Liz Hurley's best :rolleyes: :D :thumbsup:




That's a nice old one Mike :) Unfortunately, the thread index only covers the first few hundred pages of this thread, but 'Vulcan' was the the main trademark of Thomas Ellin & Co, after the Roman God, who is associated with Sheffield, featuring on the city crest, (along with Thor), with a statue surmounting Sheffield Town Hall. The statue was damaged slightly by the Luftwaffe during the Sheffield Blitz of World War 2. The author and painter George Cummings tells a comical story about how, also during WW2, a large group of women 'Buffer Girls' took advantage of a telescope, placed on the steps of the nearby City Hall, to check out Vulcan's anatomy :eek: :rolleyes:

42369533.jpg


Thomas Ellin (1771-1845) was the eldest of four brothers, who went into the cutlery trade as apprentices. After completing his apprenticeship, became a partner with Joseph Oldale, a table knife manufacturer, marrying his daughter Ann. In 1810, the firm rented a wheel on the River Porter, where later, they were reputed to be the first Sheffield cutlery works to use steam power.

By 1821, the firm was trading as Thomas Ellin & Co, with a new partner, cutler Edward Ingall. They continued to expand, and Thomas Ellin became Master Cutler in 1833, a position later held by his eldest son, Thomas Ellin II (1799-1847).

By 1881, the company employed 150 workers, making pen and pocket knives, Bowies, hunting knives, trade knives, and table cutlery. It remained in family hands until the retirement of Arthur William Ellin (1877-1961) in 1934. Joseph Elliot & Sons subsequently took over both the Ellin marks, and their factory, and Thomas Ellin & Co was formally dissolved in 1980.

y11909.jpg




That Spalted Maple looks good :) :thumbsup:

Good morning Guardians, we've made it through another week! :rolleyes: Hope everyone is doing OK, and looking forward to the weekend. Nothing much to do here I'm afraid, as we are still in lockdown, but I might have a walk up to the post office this afternoon, and even further afield to buy some bread tomorrow :rolleyes: :thumbsup:

Carrying an Old Friend today - Lucy :) Have a good day Guardians :thumbsup:

8BDrMVa.jpg

Thought I'd give Lucy a sweet treat ;) :thumbsup:

PCkR82D.jpg
Lucy is mighty pretty and sweet:thumbsup:. The food too:D.

Going to be rain off and on for the next week. Given that, I will more than likely carry something in stainless but during the few dry days we get I'll plop this one in the pocket based on the inspiration given to me by you, Jack:D IMG_2755.JPG
 

Jack Black

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2005
Messages
44,432
Lucy is mighty pretty and sweet:thumbsup:. The food too:D.

Going to be rain off and on for the next week. Given that, I will more than likely carry something in stainless but during the few dry days we get I'll plop this one in the pocket based on the inspiration given to me by you, Jack:D View attachment 1508042

Thanks Bill, you're a charmer ;) :D :thumbsup:

Sorry to hear about the rain my friend, it's much colder than usual here, but I'd rather have that than the rain. Thanks for joining me :) :thumbsup:
 

waynorth

Dealer / Materials Provider
Joined
Nov 19, 2005
Messages
23,873
Thanks Jack!! I was passing along some unused shooting paraphernalia, and found the screwdriver in the bottom of a drawer. A tribute to my target-shooting days. Reminds me of "Zen and the art of the Bullseye"!!:D
(A should-have-written book!!:p)
.45 ACP was my favorite!!
 

Nature Boy

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
1,850
That's a nice old one Mike :) Unfortunately, the thread index only covers the first few hundred pages of this thread, but 'Vulcan' was the the main trademark of Thomas Ellin & Co, after the Roman God, who is associated with Sheffield, featuring on the city crest, (along with Thor), with a statue surmounting Sheffield Town Hall. The statue was damaged slightly by the Luftwaffe during the Sheffield Blitz of World War 2. The author and painter George Cummings tells a comical story about how, also during WW2, a large group of women 'Buffer Girls' took advantage of a telescope, placed on the steps of the nearby City Hall, to check out Vulcan's anatomy :eek: :rolleyes:

42369533.jpg


Thomas Ellin (1771-1845) was the eldest of four brothers, who went into the cutlery trade as apprentices. After completing his apprenticeship, became a partner with Joseph Oldale, a table knife manufacturer, marrying his daughter Ann. In 1810, the firm rented a wheel on the River Porter, where later, they were reputed to be the first Sheffield cutlery works to use steam power.

By 1821, the firm was trading as Thomas Ellin & Co, with a new partner, cutler Edward Ingall. They continued to expand, and Thomas Ellin became Master Cutler in 1833, a position later held by his eldest son, Thomas Ellin II (1799-1847).

By 1881, the company employed 150 workers, making pen and pocket knives, Bowies, hunting knives, trade knives, and table cutlery. It remained in family hands until the retirement of Arthur William Ellin (1877-1961) in 1934. Joseph Elliot & Sons subsequently took over both the Ellin marks, and their factory, and Thomas Ellin & Co was formally dissolved in 1980.

y11909.jpg




That Spalted Maple looks good :) :thumbsup:

Good morning Guardians, we've made it through another week! :rolleyes: Hope everyone is doing OK, and looking forward to the weekend. Nothing much to do here I'm afraid, as we are still in lockdown, but I might have a walk up to the post office this afternoon, and even further afield to buy some bread tomorrow :rolleyes: :thumbsup:

Carrying an Old Friend today - Lucy :) Have a good day Guardians :thumbsup:

8BDrMVa.jpg
Thank you for that great history, Jack!
Very informative, as usual. It makes me even happier to have it. It might have been my first lambsfoot, from back when I could pick one up for a song! Not sure why I haven’t posted it before, other than it doesn’t see much use. The horn is pretty warped, to the point of bending the liners!
 

Jack Black

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2005
Messages
44,432
Thanks Jack!! I was passing along some unused shooting paraphernalia, and found the screwdriver in the bottom of a drawer. A tribute to my target-shooting days. Reminds me of "Zen and the art of the Bullseye"!!:D
(A should-have-written book!!:p)
.45 ACP was my favorite!!

Zen and the Art of the Bullseye would have been a great title for a book on target-shooting Charlie :D :) :thumbsup:

Thank you for that great history, Jack!
Very informative, as usual. It makes me even happier to have it. It might have been my first lambsfoot, from back when I could pick one up for a song! Not sure why I haven’t posted it before, other than it doesn’t see much use. The horn is pretty warped, to the point of bending the liners!

Thank you, and you're very welcome Mike :) Yeah, old Lambsfoot knives have certainly gone up in price these past few years o_O Sorry to hear about the horn, I wonder if that could be reversed? You'll find some discussion about horn maintenance referenced in the thread index, but perhaps addressing the issue might not be possible if it has been warped for decades without removing the horn. It is generally pretty elastic though. Thanks again for showing it Mike :thumbsup:

No reason.
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Cool pic Jer :) :thumbsup:

Good morning Guardians, hope everyone is having a nice weekend :) I have a few chores to do, and then I'm going to go for a walk, and pick up some bread, highlight of my week at the moment :rolleyes: Hope you find some fun Guardians, have a great weekend ;) :thumbsup:

tg8GfqT.jpg
 
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