"Old Knives"

r8shell

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
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Jan 16, 2010
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ps. That in no way means other opinions are not wanted and deeply appreciated. I welcome and would value many of the regulars on here to express their views.
You say there were no known Grand Dad Barlows of that era. When did they first show up? Perhaps it isn't a true Furness, but still venerably old.
 

Fodderwing

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Jan 31, 2017
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You say there were no known Grand Dad Barlows of that era. When did they first show up? Perhaps it isn't a true Furness, but still venerably old.
I was listening to Neal (Herder) the other day on Jason Ritchie's podcast (the catch bit show). He made a statement to that effect. No granddad barlows from Sheffield in that era. I am paraphrasing of course. That is what I am basing it on. Also I don't recall ever seeing one on this forum. I think you may be right but the knife sure looks and feels legit.
 
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eisman

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Sep 9, 2009
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67DFC54E-7B1E-40DC-B563-A38241E1EB67_1_201_a.jpeg
Pretty rare all on it's own, and then there's this...

Love the bolsters too.
 

herder

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Feb 24, 2007
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A grandaddy barlow (5 inches in length closed). As far as I can tell the tang stamp is EDWARD / FURNESS / ENGLAND. It has been my understanding that there were no Sheffield barlows of this pattern from this era. No idea if the knife is legitimate or not. It is very tight with good snap. The knife has integral bolsters. I have provided a good number of photos so the experts may have a chance to evaluate it. View attachment 1811112 View attachment 1811111 View attachment 1811114 View attachment 1811113 View attachment 1811123 View attachment 1811124 View attachment 1811122

That's a great example and I think it's absolutely legitimate, but very unusual for three reasons.
First, as I mentioned in the podcast, I hadn't remembered seeing a Daddy (or Grand Daddy) Barlow that was produced in England. But facts always trump memory. :)
I did some hard digging and came up with one such large example from Johnathon Crookes circa 1920, so they did in fact exist, but are still quite rare. (picture enclosed)
The second odd trait on your model is the clip blade. While clip blades are found on some Russell Barlow's and are also seen on some other brands, clip blades are definitely not common on English Barlow knives.
But again, the catalog illustration from Crookes shows a Daddy Barlow with a clip blade.
The final oddity on your model is the blade tang stamp. All of the Furness Barlow knives that I have seen have the blade stamp lengthwise on the blade and not on the tang itself.
But the Crookes model shows a tang stamp and all the Wostenholm Barlow models also had blade tang stamps.
So, I would bet that your knife is correct and probably one of the last from E. Furness dating to the early 1900s.
It would seem that your knife and the Crookes model shown were riding off the popularity of the large Russell Barlow's with clip blades in the early 20th century.
Good score my friend.

Barlow Crookes c 1920 (1200x636) (2).jpg
 

Fodderwing

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That's a great example and I think it's absolutely legitimate, but very unusual for three reasons.
Thank you Neal for the reply. Very interesting and a lucky find for sure! Greatly enjoyed the podcast on barlows.
 
Joined
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Wow! I have only seen a couple. It’s amazing to see a bunch all in one place. I’ve heard it called a “hollow spoon” punch. Does not look very good for leather.
 

waynorth

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Nov 19, 2005
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Wow! I have only seen a couple. It’s amazing to see a bunch all in one place. I’ve heard it called a “hollow spoon” punch. Does not look very good for leather.
Actually they cut very well, as long as you only want a single-sized series of holes!! Good for lacing, if they are sharp!!
Charlie, those aren't punches, they are for eating peas! That was the origin of the hobo knife. :eek:
Ha Ha!!! Wish I had known that when I was a Hobo!! I wouldn't have lost so many peas!! ;) 🤣
 

r8shell

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Jan 16, 2010
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They certainly could; when sharp, they cut a neat, round hole.
You can't vary the hole size like you can with a wedge-shaped punch, however!
I'm thinking it's more for cutting grooves than making holes, but I'm just guessing really.
 
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