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THE Hollow Handle Knife Thread

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gear, Survival Equipment & More' started by Sam Wilson, Dec 5, 2013.

  1. TAH

    TAH Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 3, 2001
    Actually, I updated that photo tonight. I replaced #6 with my latest compass and removed the Japanese liquid filled present day Randall compass. It finally formed a bubble after about 5 years.

    I don't doubt that these companies might have made mini dry compasses in the past. My comment in post #2968 still stands. There is only one mini (1.5 cm or less) dry high quality compass being made today that I am aware of. If there are others being made today, I would love to see them.

    I have read this is not a good idea because dry compasses use higher quality (harder) jewel bearings that can withstand years of dial rotation. Liquid filled compasses use lower quality (softer) bearings. The liquid has two functions - 1) to slow down/steady the dial and 2) to soften the dial rotation by lubricating the bearing. According to compass manufacturers, the bearing will eventually wear out if the liquid is removed.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
  2. Silvano Marlon

    Silvano Marlon

    30
    May 3, 2018
    TAH, when I answered you and other members talking about button compasses, I wanted to help. I didn't expect you to interpret this in some wrong or personal way. I also didn't expect you only search or only appreciate the dry compasses which are produced today. As I mentioned, I saw in my hands, dry compasses of these quoted brands in stores not long time ago, if I saw this in my country, I believe this can be found There in some places, even if they are not being manufactured right now. In my case, I have several hollow handle survival knives and the vast majority of that knives fit 2 centimeters compass in the buttcaps.

    About what you told me of the functions of the liquid and about the bearings, this really goes against what I always read reported by high qualitty compasses manufacturers I know. The function of the liquid, according report by this brands, has always been to stabilize the disc (reduce the efects of the vibrations and oscillations of the disc) to the disc stop faster in the right position. Also, high quality Liquid filled compasses, use to have good quality bearings (and not "low qualitty bearings"), most of Liquid filled good quality compasses have bearings made of jewels (please check out the websites or manuals of good manufactures) and some times other really high qualitty bearing systems. The first compasses I removed the liquids I did it in the 80's and these mini compasses are working perfectly until today, even some medium qualitty made compasses too. Anyway, I believe you should know that button (mini) compasses are not made for precision or accuratted reading, due to the physical limitation of the smaller dial size, mini or button compasses are made only for basic orientation.

    In any case, this subject of mini dry compass with 'the technical specifications, size and manufacturing period' that you are looking for or want to know, I have nothing else to contribute or try to help. I hope you understand. Regards.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
  3. TAH

    TAH Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 3, 2001
    Silvano, slow down there, partner. The compass discussion started with cricketdave saying...
    I said...
    You said...
    The way your post is written, it suggests that these brands are currently producing mini, dry compasses, so I was excited at the thought that there were other compasses readily available other than the NATO. I was just asking where to find them or for a photo, since I have never seen one. The photos you posted were all liquid filled compasses, not dry. If all of the dry compasses that you mentioned are discontinued and can only be rarely found on eBay, that's going to be very difficult for someone like cricketdave who needs multiple compasses.
     
  4. cricketdave

    cricketdave Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 24, 2008
    I'm going to try either this one

    [​IMG]

    or this one
    [​IMG]
     
    protourist and TAH like this.
  5. TAH

    TAH Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 3, 2001
    Let us know what you think if you move forward with one.

    ETA: Are you looking for dry compasses that will fit in the buttcap or just packed in the handle?
     
  6. Mark Knapp

    Mark Knapp Dealer / Materials Provider Dealer / Materials Provider

    Dec 20, 2009
    I'm starting another extreme bushcrafting trek in the Brooks Range starting Saturday July 14. My last one was cut short due to threatening winter storms and the late spring in the arctic.

    Like the last time, you can follow along, if you like, at my blog web site

    https://www.markknappalaskaadventures.com/

    I will be trying to simulate a real survival situation, living off the land, no tent, no sleeping bag, no cook gear. I'll have a complete gear list posted on my site. I'm doing this for many reasons. To test my 1911 Combat Survivor Bowie and Ulu, to see what they and the gear included in the handle do well and what they don't do well. Also of primary importance is to get/stay in better physical shape, test my other gear, expand my knowledge, hone my skills and teach a little of what I know.

    Also, I hope to help expand the known ranges of some of our fish species in Alaska. It's not known what fish inhabit most of the lakes in the arctic. It's my wish to help the Alaska Department fisheries fill in some of the gaps (I've done a little of that in the past). I may also be able to identify some archeological sites.

    On my last trip I used a hardware store tarp and space blankets for my shelter. On this trip I'll be using BCUSA 10 x 10 tarp exclusively. It was graciously sent to me by our friend Jason for testing and evaluation on my trips. On my previous trip I had problems with the grommets pulling out of the hardware store tarp. It's easy to see that the BCUSA tarp is not going to have the same problem.

    On this trip I'll be walking the Sagavanirktok (Sag) river from it's head to the pipeline haul road, a distance of 100 to 120 miles. It will take two to three weeks. The Sag was to be the final leg of my earlier trek.

    Follow along if you like. I'll be making daily journal reports via IN-Reach along the way and have plenty of video to share when I get back.

    Wish me luck, thanks Mark

     
    Hard Knocks and JD Mandrell like this.
  7. cricketdave

    cricketdave Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 24, 2008
    I'm going to take the old ones out of the buttcap and replace with one of the dry compasses

    Mark, be careful and have fun we will be following to see how it goes
     
  8. Mark Knapp

    Mark Knapp Dealer / Materials Provider Dealer / Materials Provider

    Dec 20, 2009
    Thanks bud.
     
  9. Mark Knapp

    Mark Knapp Dealer / Materials Provider Dealer / Materials Provider

    Dec 20, 2009
    I am sad to report that my second attempt at a solo, living-off-the-land trek in the Brooks Range this year was also thwarted by severe weather.

    After getting my take out vehicle staged at the right spot, while we were headed to my drop off point, 70 road miles higher in the mountains, the fog rolled in and filled the valley right down to the deck. It's not possible to navigate in the mountains with such bad visibility so we returned to our base camp to wait it out. Soon after the fog came in it started to rain, then changed to snow. A day and a half later the snow stopped and the fog rose.

    When we returned to my drop off location at the 3000 foot elevation the mountains were blanketed with three inches of new snow and ice from freezing rain. My trek involved crossing the mountains through a pass at 6000 feet. Given what we had at 3000 feet I could only imagine what was waiting for me at six thousand. With possibly up to a foot of new snow and ice covering shale slides and boulder fields it would have been foolish to attempt it.

    My support crew had obligations to attend to in Fairbanks like jobs and family to pick up at the airport so we didn't have time to wait for the snow to melt. Once again I had to call it off.

    I was able to get some really good video of grizzly bears, musk ox, caribou and a red fox hunting mice as well as me catching my biggest lake trout ever on a fly. You can check these videos out as well as others of the weather conditions in the mountains on my blog if you like.

    My time and budget have been stretched to their limits for this summer, so I'll have to wait to try again. Maybe one of these times I will catch a break.

    Thanks for all the support, Mark
     
    protourist likes this.
  10. Silvano Marlon

    Silvano Marlon

    30
    May 3, 2018
    You did very well in being prudent. A mature mind decision to respect the bad mood of nature. It is wonderful to venture into the wilderness, but using your instincts about safety and no ignoring the signs of danger and certain kinds of obstacles.

    I'm sure there will be no shortage of opportunities in the future and you will complete your plan.
     
  11. Silvano Marlon

    Silvano Marlon

    30
    May 3, 2018
    Explora survival, created by the venezuelan Doctor Charles Brewer Carias in the 70's and made by Marto of Spain since the 70's (out of production since 1.991):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    gotgoat likes this.
  12. Silvano Marlon

    Silvano Marlon

    30
    May 3, 2018
    Survival knives of Aitor golden era, high qualitty and finishings very superior than the knives manufactured by Aitor after the end of the 90's (when the company was bought) and foward.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2018
    Justin.P, blackhat and gotgoat like this.
  13. Mark Knapp

    Mark Knapp Dealer / Materials Provider Dealer / Materials Provider

    Dec 20, 2009
    Thanks Silvano
     
    Silvano Marlon likes this.
  14. Armorerroy

    Armorerroy

    4
    Oct 6, 2018
    Schrade survival knife with Savage sheath.


    [​IMG]

    Survival kit inside



    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]


    Its new home.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2018
    Peter Mandrake, gotgoat, A.L. and 3 others like this.
  15. BoozeFighter

    BoozeFighter

    135
    Jul 6, 2015
    Which model do you have? I have the SCHF1SM (the smaller, drop point model) and I am quite happy with it, it is a well built tough knife.
     
  16. Armorerroy

    Armorerroy

    4
    Oct 6, 2018
    Schf1

    It is a well built knife.
     
  17. Chris2253

    Chris2253

    3
    Oct 20, 2018
    I apologize for the repeat post but I meant it for this thread!
    [​IMG] [​IMG]Good evening folks, my name is Chris and I’m just being thrown into knife collecting. I grew in Russellville Arkansas... literally a mile from the Lile shop and frequently visited, even met Sly at a signing once (86,87?). Anyhow as a kid growing up in the 80’s of course I loved the First Blood movies. I had a family member that was very good friends with Jimmy and bought a few of his knifes and I was recently gifted my “grail” knife from his collection. It is the #11 Mission knife, I have been around this knife my entire childhood and most of my adult life and will now proudly display it. So that poses a few questions: 1. What’s the best way to care for the knife and sheath, and how do you all display your knive (or do you). 2. I would love to learn more about the “Rambo” knives and their history. 3. And being knew I doubt I’ll get love here on it haha but I remember seeing in Liles shop as a kid a “Mini Mission”, do y’all ever see those around here? I’d love to start adding to this lone knife collection!


    Any help would be awesome!
     
  18. TAH

    TAH Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 3, 2001
    Welcome! You have a great hollow handle knife to start your collection. Not sure how you might want to display it, but do not store the knife in the sheath. Steel and leather do not like each other if they're touching for a long period of time.

    As for Rambo knives and their history, this website would be a good start: http://www.cartertown.com/rambo1.htm
     
    Chris2253 likes this.
  19. Armorerroy

    Armorerroy

    4
    Oct 6, 2018
    Chris2253

    How you choose to display your knife is up to you. I have several knives in my office that are sentimental to me. One is an ak bayonet that I got in Afghanistan. I always worry that if I’m burglarized it will be taken.
     
    Chris2253 likes this.
  20. Chris2253

    Chris2253

    3
    Oct 20, 2018
    Wow, thank you... what an informative article. Fortunately though the blade has been stored in its original sheath is still in “new” condition. Thanks for the feedback... I’m going to pick up a few more I think and have a table made.
     
    TAH likes this.

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