Try this.

Ankerson

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Munk,

The HI Katana has recieved alot of great reviews, it's a great cutting sword from what I have been reading. You may want to take to Bill about one.


I wouldn't mind having one to test for awhile. ;)
 
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Ankerson- I went back and reread the thread about Tarwars- it was you who said a Tarwar could cut a Katana to bits.



munk
 

Ankerson

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Originally posted by munk
Ankerson- I went back and reread the thread about Tarwars- it was you who said a Tarwar could cut a Katana to bits.



munk


Yeah I know.:D And as I said in this thread it will break a Cheap Katana or a WWII Production Katana made in a factory.:)

But a good Folded Steel Katana, more than likely not.;)
 

Ankerson

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Munk,

Put a Tarwar against a Katana in the same price range and the Tarwar would eat it for Lunch everytime and come back for seconds.:D


You can snap a cheap Katana over your knee....they aren't real Katanas. Thin blades with poor heat treating and soft steel. They are fine for display swords...(Wall Hangers) but not much else.

The Tarwar is one heck of a strong sword.
 
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Is there any sword lighter than a Katana and strong enough? Could Zorro kill your Samuria? - hitting a new low of ridiculous questions...


Yeah, I know- Zorro only gets the point, not the edge to attack with.


munk
 

Ankerson

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Originally posted by munk
Is there any sword lighter than a Katana and strong enough? Could Zorro kill your Samuria? - hitting a new low of ridiculous questions...


Yeah, I know- Zorro only gets the point, not the edge to attack with.


munk


LOL...

Have you seen those thin little swords they used? Put one of those against a Katana....the Katana would cut it in half like butter.
 
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Ankerson. what about metalurgy? I mean, a modern Mercedes Benz truck spring has got to have qualities in it, that once expertly forged and differentially hardened, a 500 year old thousand times folded Katana does not? Where's firkin?



munk
 

Ankerson

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We have different swords for differet styles and uses.

The Tarwar is more of a Broad Sword, heavy to smash through armor and thinner ligher battle swords.

The Katanas are in a class by themselves (Not including the Production WWII Factory Ones that are not true Folded Steel Katanas).
 

Ankerson

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Originally posted by munk
Ankerson. what about metalurgy? I mean, a modern Mercedes Benz truck spring has got to have qualities in it, that once expertly forged and differentially hardened, a 500 year old thousand times folded Katana does not? Where's firkin?



munk


You won't see an Antique 500 year old Katana being used today, they are worth a ton of cash and are in private collections. They are also very tough.

Some things never change, the Japanese found the perfect steel forging process about 600 years ago from what I remember.
 

Ankerson

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Munk,

Alot of smiths use spring steel and yes it's good for making swords. Properly fordged and heat treated it is very tough and has excellent qualities. Thats why the HI Khuks and Swords are so good. Good steel fordged by skilled craftsmen.:)
 

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Some of you may remember me talking of handing an Everest Katana to a friend while sitting in my truck, and the guy handed it back to me and I resheathed it, and drove away with the window down. I didn't think I'd touched anything, but as I hit about ten or 12 mph a feather from my mirror's dream catcher blew off, cut clealy through halfway down the feather.

I decided it was sharp enough.
 

Ankerson

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Munk,


a 500 year old thousand times folded Katana does not?


Here is closeup of my folded blades, you can see the layers...(About 1000 layers)


attachment.php
 

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Ankerson

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Originally posted by Rusty
Some of you may remember me talking of handing an Everest Katana to a friend while sitting in my truck, and the guy handed it back to me and I resheathed it, and drove away with the window down. I didn't think I'd touched anything, but as I hit about ten or 12 mph a feather from my mirror's dream catcher blew off, cut clealy through halfway down the feather.

I decided it was sharp enough.


Rusty,

I guess it was...:D
 
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Ankerson, I read the links- at least, enough to know how good those swords were and are. But of modern metalurgy? There was nothing in the links comparing the swords to modern steels. Surely the Japanese masters still could not meet all of today's standards of metalurgy? By this I mean new combinations of metal, and manufacturing techniques not available to them.

I'm curious,

munk
 

not2sharp

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The katana vrs. just about everything else debate has been ranging seemingly for ever. We are not going to resolve it here. But, advocates on both sides should acknowledge that the user often determines the results. Someone who has developed good skills with a sword can do things with it that seem to defy physics. How easy it is to flex the edge into the wrong position, to swing it too fast, or too slowly, to hit at the wrong angle or with the wrong part of the blade. There is no magic here, it is all just steel; but, skill can make the difficult seem effortless.

n2s
 

Ankerson

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The katana vrs. just about everything else debate has been ranging seemingly for ever.


Yeah it has and always will, and no we aren't going to settle this tonite.:)

Yes it is true the skill of the swordsmen makes the difference most of the time and some luck never hurt either.;)
 
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So, Ankerson, if you wouldn't mind taking the time, can you outline some of the basics for cutting with a katana? Can similar techniques be applied to cutting with khukuris? Enquiring minds want to know;)
--Josh
 

Ankerson

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Originally posted by munk
Ankerson, I read the links- at least, enough to know how good those swords were and are. But of modern metalurgy? There was nothing in the links comparing the swords to modern steels. Surely the Japanese masters still could not meet all of today's standards of metalurgy? By this I mean new combinations of metal, and manufacturing techniques not available to them.

I'm curious,

munk


Munk,

I really don't think that it matters all that much if they did or not. That's why the Katanas were and still are so good. With all the real testing the Japanese did they found what they concidered to be the best way to produce tough blades.

Remember all swords are compared to the Katanas, not the other way around.
 
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