W2

Willie71

Warren J. Krywko
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Messages
12,214
Thanks for that link. The part about the clay not being what determines the hamon makes sense to me now. Because the hamon I got on mine looks nothing like the clay that I put on the blade.

The clay might or might not define where the hamon is, but it's one variable amongst many. Temp, time, steel condition, type and thickness of clay, and quench medium and time all play a roll. Keep notes, and pay close attention to what you feel through the tongs during quench, especially if doing an interrupted quench.
 

Willie71

Warren J. Krywko
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Messages
12,214
I got part of one lip right on this one. I first tried for a hamon in 2012, and most of the knives I've done are differentials hardened.

27255734430_0c13101906_c.jpg
[/url]image by Wjkrywko, on Flickr[/IMG]

27255732640_2edf409ef2_c.jpg
[/url]image by Wjkrywko, on Flickr[/IMG]

This was using clay.

15813355471_25e025f2c9_c.jpg
[/url]IMG_5926 by Wjkrywko, on Flickr[/IMG]

This was clayless
 
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jdm61

itinerant metal pounder
Joined
Aug 12, 2005
Messages
47,357
So are you saying that you sold me a USPS bin full of bad steel? :grumpy:;) Any difference in the carbon content as far as you know?
The round stock is higher quality, better hamon, cleaner.
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2002
Messages
12,297
So are you saying that you sold me a USPS bin full of bad steel? :grumpy:;) Any difference in the carbon content as far as you know?
The sq stock was fabulous until I got the round... Then I systematically bought all the round I could afford, over 20,000 pounds. :cool:

Carbon seems about the same, I made some good knives with the sq & use a lot of it in damascus. But the round stock is special.
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2010
Messages
2,026
Wow, that's some serious banding, or did you forge and fold that stuff?

Hoss
 
Joined
Dec 21, 2006
Messages
3,158
You guys with more knowledge correct me if I'm wrong, but banding can be "broken up" by a solid normalizing heat. It can also be "caused" by excessive time at spheroidization temps, or too many cycles in that spheroidizing heat range.
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2002
Messages
12,297
You guys with more knowledge correct me if I'm wrong, but banding can be "broken up" by a solid normalizing heat. It can also be "caused" by excessive time at spheroidization temps, or too many cycles in that spheroidizing heat range.
One normalizing heat wont get rid of it, the blade above was forged & normalized 3-4 times.

Devin will have to answer the rest, he knows A lot more the I do. :)
 

jdm61

itinerant metal pounder
Joined
Aug 12, 2005
Messages
47,357
I still have two full bundles of the 3/4 and maybe the 7/8 round. I will eventually use some of that for straight razors and small knives. I am a little low on the 1 inch plus stuff as I used it a lot. still have a few bars of the 1 7/8, the biggest stuff that Don sold initially before he let go of some his secret stash of the really big stuff that he slices into little round cookies and forges into 12 into bowie blades!!!!!! I have though about using that big square stuff for "premium" damascus, but I still only have the small press to squish it down.
 
Joined
Dec 21, 2006
Messages
3,158
I'd love to hear from Devin about the banding Don! Maybe he will chime in. In the meantime, may I offer the source of where I got the idea that normalizing should fix it?

"Virtually all the desirable properties we want are maximized through homogeneity, banding is the opposite of this and many a scam has be foisted on the public, or other knifemakers, by exploiting general ignorance on the topic. Normalizing corrects banding, one good soak above Accm will pretty much erase it. But excessive slow cooling or excessive cycling at lower temperatures will bring it back." - Kevin Cashen, Hypefreebladeforums, thread titled "Wootz like etch patterns in 52100".
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2002
Messages
12,297
Stuart, I don't always agree with stuff I read on the interwebs. ;)

But yes, a good soak well above critical will erase it, then normalizing to fix the soak at high temp.

This is one case where I do not want to "correct banding".
 

jdm61

itinerant metal pounder
Joined
Aug 12, 2005
Messages
47,357
When I first saw that knife, I thought it was some of your high layer old school W2/iron damascus. So now you admit that you cheated? :eek::D
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2002
Messages
12,297
When I first saw that knife, I thought it was some of your high layer old school W2/iron damascus. So now you admit that you cheated? :eek::D
Workin smarter is better than cheated I think. :cool: It looks better than my high layer damascus and it a whole lot easier.
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2010
Messages
2,026
Most banding comes from low temp forging and cycling. This stuff looks old. Banding is eliminated by forging above Accm usually.

Hoss
 
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