What "Traditional Knife" are ya totin' today?

Crazy Canuck

Singing along with the voices in my head
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Joined
Nov 24, 2013
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2,141
Mini Trapper and Compact today
dgoiRka.jpg
 

Duckdog

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Joined
Jul 26, 2012
Messages
3,874
Since it's Twosday and since several nice Delrin-clad knives have been posted recently and since sometimes there's a Trapper Twosday, I'm totin' these two Remingtons today: Hunter (1986) and Fisherman (1997), both by Camillus.

4Ei3Sqs.jpg


And, yes, I'm wearing my big pockets pants.
- Stuart
 

JohnDF

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Joined
May 14, 2018
Messages
17,043
Since it's Twosday and since several nice Delrin-clad knives have been posted recently and since sometimes there's a Trapper Twosday, I'm totin' these two Remingtons today: Hunter (1986) and Fisherman (1997), both by Camillus.

4Ei3Sqs.jpg


And, yes, I'm wearing my big pockets pants.
- Stuart
Hunter and Fisherman
Can't think of a better pairing than that. :cool::thumbsup:
 

Duckdog

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Joined
Jul 26, 2012
Messages
3,874
Thank you, Stuart, much appreciated. That S&M cigar jack of yours looks very pre-war, what can you tell us about it?
The bone and jigging is fantastic!

Wow Stuart, the covers on your vintage S&M are mind boggling!!!:thumbsup::thumbsup::confused:

That bone S&M equal end of yours is a real standout, looks to be in excellent condition.:thumbsup:

What a beauty, lovely bone on that one !

Thanks, guys. Jeff, the knife is a legacy from my late stepfather so all that I know about it is from my research. The tang stamp dates it at 1902-1928. S&M was going out of business around 1928 and was sold at sheriff's bankruptcy sale in 1932 to Queen City Cutlery (which had been founded in 1922 by 5 master cutlers fired by S&M), both firms located in Titusville, PA. Queen revived the S&M brand in more recent years. S&M used Rogers bone for its handles, as did many other cutlery firms, including Queen City from it's foundation until it started switching to Winterbottom bone in 1930. A side note: according to research by Bernard Levine, the Rogers Manufacturing Company, which made the distinctively jigged bone called "Rogers bone", referred to that pattern as "Rogers Stag". Queen referred to the Winterbottom bone handles on its knives as "genuine Frontier bone stag". BTW, Rogers still has the original jigging machine use to make Rogers bone, though it hasn't been used since 1962.
- Stuart
 
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