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Crosscut Saw Thread

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by G-pig, Sep 26, 2011.

  1. trailtime

    trailtime

    171
    Feb 4, 2005
    I occasionally come across saws like that. I don't have a good answer for you as to why. When filing a saw, I frequently vacuum off the filings to keep the blade and workspace clean. A good shop vac with a brush attachment should suck the filings off your saw.
     
    phantomknives likes this.
  2. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    I'm with you. But I don't have too many saws (only 7). Some guys around here have dozens or even hundreds of saws. I can understand them cutting a saw to make it perform in the best way possible for their use. So much labor goes into sawing that it makes sense to use what you like best.
     
    Trailsawyer likes this.
  3. Old Axeman

    Old Axeman

    380
    Jan 10, 2015
    I agree about cutting up a perfectly good saw or a piece of history. My excuse is that a guy in his twenties, who is competing to win the big prize, does not care. He can only think about winning. In hind sight, it was the wrong thing to do. But, it did improve the performance!
    Cutting off both ends instead of just one end made the Atkins stiffer, with less whip.
     
  4. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    Mar 31, 2016
    [​IMG]
    Finally taking out the new guy. Cuts good and right smooth on some frozen pine. Had 3 casualties today, first, I nearly dropped the single man, went to grab it and ripped off half my finger nail. 2nd was my jacket. Gotta be careful with loose jackets and large saws.

    Sadly, 3rd was the threads on the saw handle. I was just running the saw, heard a pop, handle loosened up and I couldn't tighten it up anymore
     
  5. trailtime

    trailtime

    171
    Feb 4, 2005
    Sounds like the bolt failed. This guy had good small bolts. You'll need to get a wingnut and fit a pin to it.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Cross-Cut-...549181?hash=item3afbbcabfd:g:MssAAOSwv0tVC2gd

    Have you made sheaths for your saws? Channel lattice works well, is really tough, and can be found at most big box hardware stores.
     
  6. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    Mar 31, 2016
    [​IMG]
    Anybody have an idea about this etch? It's off to the side of the "centerpiece" (I couldn't get a good picture of the other two bits)like an arch and a 5 and what seems to be a bush near the spine of the plate. If you have a guess, let me see it and I'll tell you if it matches the other etches
     
    Miller '72 likes this.
  7. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    I've been using lattice. I saw it on Dolly's website and I like it. But I'm not thrilled with the ski straps I'm binding it with. The new stuff isn't as elastic as the old stuff. Are you using velcro? How do you like it? Anyone got a real crackerjack way of securing the lattice?
     
  8. junkenstien

    junkenstien Basic Member Basic Member

    267
    Feb 15, 2017
    Always wished they would put pull tabs or ears on them Velcro straps,hard to get them tight and get my fingers out of the way to close it.Thanks,I looked at saw sheaths and found sun river saddelery,best looking axe masks I have seen.Have been finding lots of uses for little bungee cords that the hooks slide up and down on.
     
  9. Jim Thode

    Jim Thode

    9
    Apr 17, 2016
    I too prefer a two man handle for most sawing. A D handle is good for simple down from the top sawing but not so good for underbucking. If you are bucking logs you will have to underbuck often. Of western handles I like ones without a bolt on the back and my favorite handles now are shaped to match the natural angle of the hand. Many current competition handles have an angle and it is not hard to convert a standard western handle with a bent handle.

    Under bucking with a D handle:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    A D handle works well for cutting like this:
    [​IMG]

    This is not a bad handle but now I prefer one with a bent handle:
    [​IMG]

    A western handle like this is better then a straight handle:
    [​IMG]

    And a ergonomic handle like this can be reversed for the best underbucking handle:
    [​IMG]

    Jim
     
  10. trailtime

    trailtime

    171
    Feb 4, 2005
    I'm happy with Velcro on my lattice sheaths, but it has its limits. My first experiment with it used 1" straps and that didn't hold as well. Moving up to 2" seemed to do the trick. After I made that YT video, I stopped using screws and just shoe-goo'd the straps to the lattice (it helps adhesion to scuff up the lattice with 60g sandpaper before applying the SG). If you drill too big of a screw hole in the lattice it will compromise the integrity of the plastic. I've only had one screw hole break and that was on a really COLD day. Always looking to make thinks work better.
     
    Trailsawyer likes this.
  11. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    591
    Jul 25, 2017
    Today I started to file my 36" Plain Tooth Supplee Biddle, put almost 3 hours in doing one side of cutters, starting on the flip side before I had to call it.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I want them to more resemble "almonds" in shape...I will get there I hope :):thumbsup:
     
  12. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    591
    Jul 25, 2017
    Any chance you found more out or cleaned up the etch to be more visible?
     
    phantomknives likes this.
  13. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    Mar 31, 2016
    Sorry to say no, the etches are nearly visible but my phone doesn't like taking pictures of etches
     
    Miller '72 likes this.
  14. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    591
    Jul 25, 2017
    I wonder if Its not a bush you see and if you have an Atkins or Simonds saw...
    I don't know to say one way or the other FWIW.
    The intrigue makes it fun.
     
  15. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    591
    Jul 25, 2017
    I am still hopeful I will get the few minutes I need to go test my saw I finished sharpening one more hour late last night.

    Can anyone suggest what size noodle or dust I can hope for from a plain tooth pattern saw?

    [​IMG]
     
  16. trailtime

    trailtime

    171
    Feb 4, 2005
    Absent any rakers, you won't get noodles but you will get chips. Shouldn't get dust.
     
    Square_peg, rjdankert and Miller '72 like this.
  17. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    591
    Jul 25, 2017
    Thank you trailtime.
    I was not sure how to gauge my first attempt.
    I lost the light today but had to try it out and took a few pictures that hopefully and accurately describe what I found. Possibly small chips, certainly bigger than dust but I also concede the saw and the sharpening are far from perfect...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    My seeing chips may be my optimism and desire to see chips and not dust. An objective set of eyes will settle that score for sure.
    The cutters are set at .016"
    Thanks for looking

    -Miller
     
    phantomknives and Square_peg like this.
  18. trailtime

    trailtime

    171
    Feb 4, 2005
    I bet it started easily. Is it flat ground?
     
  19. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    591
    Jul 25, 2017
    It is flat ground and it did start easily, just a few or more strokes to get it going.
    I didn't find the saw moving remarkably fast thru the log while cutting but it was the same or better than the not sharpened 36" Keystone with rakers I have and cut a few logs with a couple weeks ago.
    Thanks for any suggestions.

    -Miller
     
  20. trailtime

    trailtime

    171
    Feb 4, 2005
    In my first try at filing a plain tooth saw, I put steeper fleam angles on the teeth. Though sharply pointed, it didn't cut as well as I'd hoped, and didn't clear chips very well. I remembered some advice I'd gotten from a filer named Alan Boyko who told me to file a saw one way, cut with it, and then try other settings on the same saw to see what difference it made. So I studied other plain tooth saws and decided re-joint and refile with much shallower fleam angles. This second try was closer to some original factory angles and cut and cleared chips better. The only real difference from the factory filing was that I hammered the set lower on the teeth. I often find that factory set on one-man saws is put at the very tips of teeth and can weaken the metal with an extreme bend.

    I know this seems like a lot of work, but it's not a business for me.

    First try:
    [​IMG]

    Second try:
    [​IMG]
     
    Miller '72, 300Six and Square_peg like this.

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