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Fiddleback Foraging

Discussion in 'Fiddleback Forge Knives' started by Odaon, Apr 23, 2016.

  1. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    Could you please post some more pics of the blue berries? I have a plant I am trying to identify.

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  2. Odaon

    Odaon Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 13, 2009
    That looks real close to the blueberries. Hard to say! Definitely in the Vaccinium genus. Though that's probably not helpful because there are about 450 species within that genus.

    The only one I regularly run into is Vaccinium scoparium, grouse whortleberry. Tiny little berries that remind me of a tart Starburst candy. Not really worth trying to collect enough for anything though...
     
  3. Nbrackett

    Nbrackett Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 19, 2015
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    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  4. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    Thank you. Looks very similar. Though it will be hard to tell with the differences between growing in the open and growing under a canopy. I will keep my eyes on it as it progresses, and maybe even transplant one or two to my own yard.
     
  5. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    Well the onions are about done for the year, but the wine raspberries are looking good :)

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  6. Bmurray

    Bmurray Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 9, 2012
    Great pics Brian. Where did you get that scraper you keep on this knife?
     
  7. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    Thank you. I got the strikers and ferro rods from Suffolk Metal Works, (Swonut)
     
  8. Odaon

    Odaon Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 13, 2009
    We don't have wine berries that I know of, but I've been watching the thimble berries develop!
     
  9. Phixt

    Phixt

    May 28, 2016
    mmmmmmmmmmm morels....
     
  10. Odaon

    Odaon Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 13, 2009
    I thought some of you might find this interesting or maybe you've had it before at a fancy restaurant! We've got corn smut, or in South American whats call Huitlacoche, on some of our corn in the garden at work. This is caused by a fungus called Ustilago maydis and it's a rare and prized edible. The guy who kind of manages the garden didn't know what it was so he cut the infected stalks out and threw them out of the garden a few days ago. Well I got word and went to see if there was any more or any that was salvageable on the removed stalks. Most of the tossed ones had gone to spore and are no longer good to eat at that point, but I was able to find some small ones that hadn't spored out, and one perfect large on still in the corn patch. There's more coming along so hopefully I can harvest those as well. I'm going to give them a taste later tonight and I'll report back with my findings. Apparently they're delicious!


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    Sorry for the lack of Fiddlebacks in the pictures. My F2 is off being used for a sheath template and my Warthog got left at home today.
     
  11. schmittie

    schmittie

    Nov 28, 2009
    I'm interested in how the smut went. Growing up, we put corn in the garden for years. But due to half of it turning into smut, dad quit planting corn altogether. We didn't hear until years later you can eat it.
     
  12. Odaon

    Odaon Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 13, 2009
    It was actually pretty good. Very interesting. Really mild, reminiscent of corn and slightly smokey or bitter in a good way. No mushroomy taste that I could find.

    It didn't break into my top favorite mushrooms but I would eat it again!
     
  13. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    The passion fruit is almost ripe, still a bit tangy...

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  14. Fiddleback

    Fiddleback Knifemaker Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 19, 2005
    Man, thats neato. I've seen that on my grandads corn when I used to spend the summers on his place as a boy. Never knew. Thanks!
     
  15. Odaon

    Odaon Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 13, 2009
    Definitely! I found it super interesting. Watching the corn for more to pop up!
     
  16. Nbrackett

    Nbrackett Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 19, 2015
    MY hiking buddy, 10 year old daughter Kimber, and I hit the woods today in search of some ginseng. In the couple hours we were out we did find some "roots" but the time spent with her outdoors is what I enjoy the most.

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    She wanted to hold the Bushboot to be part of the action.

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    The dry summer has a lot of the plants already yellowing and even dying down.

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  17. Odaon

    Odaon Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 13, 2009
    What do you do with the ginseng?
     
  18. Nbrackett

    Nbrackett Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 19, 2015
    We sell it to a local buyer. We don't usually have that much but at $450 - $1000 per pound dry it doesn't take too much to add up. Since Kimber has been going with me I usually just give it to her.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2016
  19. VANCE

    VANCE Allen, I have an axe to grind with you. Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Mar 13, 2006
    gotta sell that 'sang!
     
  20. Nbrackett

    Nbrackett Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 19, 2015
    When we went to sell last year there was someone else selling that had been back deeper in the woods and came out with this. Needless to say Kimber was bummed that she didn't find it. She since has talked me into buying her a camelback so she "can spend longer in the woods finding bigger roots".

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    Last edited: Sep 11, 2016

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