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Lets use those axes for what they were ment for.

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by rplarson2004, Feb 28, 2012.

  1. Old Axeman

    Old Axeman Gold Member Gold Member

    739
    Jan 10, 2015
    Lets take a look at the historic hewing video that Nbrackett so kindly pulled up. Look at juggling/scoring at 2.25- all done from the top of the log. Now look at 2.35 for the broad axe hewing- all from the side of the log with a American pattern, short, offset handled broad axe. At 3.47 look at the surface left after the juggling with the felling axe just in front of where he is with the broad axe and compare it to finished surface after the broad axe work. And last, at 6.0 you can see the huge volume of traditional American technique hewn timber. Is there any doubt that these men know what they are doing and how to best produce hewn timber ?
     
    Yankee Josh likes this.
  2. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    Getting back on topic, the broadaxe is by far the most efficient tool for carving a finished beam out of a log. Yes, it can be done with an adze but it's a lot more work and you'll end up with a different finish.


    These 2 quotes might explain the removable wedging system I described earlier on these forums.
    https://www.bladeforums.com/threads/removable-wedging-system-for-axes.1249527/
    If a broadaxe could quickly be re-hafted for the opposite hand then the hewer could hew both sides top-to-bottom without ever rolling the log and while keeping the weather side down.
     
    Yankee Josh, jake pogg and Old Axeman like this.
  3. Old Axeman

    Old Axeman Gold Member Gold Member

    739
    Jan 10, 2015
    There is a guy here that a few years ago put forth a theory that there was contact with the Spanish prior to Cook's arrival, but to date he has no positive proof. One the most interesting mysteries to me is that the first human settlement was from the South Pacific (not sure exactly where), and when they voyaged they came with what are called canoe plants (to be used for settlement). One of these plants was the sweet potato, which comes from South America. How did that happen that people from remote South Pacific islands had sweet potatoes from South America?
    This is all pre-contact, so some native Hawaiians here believe (and I believe) that being the great voyagers that Polynesians were, they sailed there outrigger canoes to South America! And then there is the mystery of the giant heads on Easter Island.
     
    Fmont and jake pogg like this.
  4. Old Axeman

    Old Axeman Gold Member Gold Member

    739
    Jan 10, 2015
    S.P. I have found more than one original American broad axe with the wedging system you describe. European broad axes are dedicated to either right or left hand. American pattern broad axes can be used either way. When I was taught to use the broad axe I was told by my grandfather in Wisconsin that being left handed I could get a higher wage and was more in demand. So yes, that could very well be. Then there are other axemen like me, and one of brothers, who can chop either right or left. Also, the first O.P. Link broad axe handles that I bought came so they could be hung either right or left and did not have a kerf, which would allow for a side wedge.
     
    Yankee Josh, Square_peg, A17 and 2 others like this.
  5. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    988
    Dec 20, 2015
    Yes,thank you,i finally managed to watch that video again,paying attention especially at the stated junctures.
    Those guys sure ARE something else entirely.
    It's a powerful method.I can see how effective it can be.
    That one snapped line is not much for reference,judging by those great expanses of perfect flat i've no doubt there's some thousands of hours of experience at work...
     
  6. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    Jul 25, 2017
    I found I had a whole hour and decided the gutters can wait a little longer.

    oak rounds, a roadside score from late winter last year.
    Collins Legitimus

    [​IMG]

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    I stuck the bit only once, and used the hammer and wedge to remove it

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    Tomorrow I will split the 1/4's to season thru for next winter.

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    Jezebel is always at my side outside

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    Nice doggo!
     
    Miller '72 likes this.
  8. A17

    A17

    883
    Jan 9, 2018
    I worked on this guy the day after I got home from vacation. Nothing gets the adrenaline pumping like a hung-up tree next to a public road! Pictured is the spot where it needed to and ended up landing. I ended up using a quad to pull the base off of the stump while imaginary cars were stopped waiting for me. And finally, all the wood from the upper area of the property courtesy of PG&E with some axe-felled trees as well. All moved with the timber jack and the pictured Oshkosh peavey onto and off of an atv trailer. As of today all those logs have been bucked up into rounds with a Husqvarna 445. Cheating, I know, but my only crosscut saw needs to be de-rusted, sharpened, and I need to finish the new handle. You can see it was almost fully separated from the stump.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  9. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    Mar 31, 2016
    [​IMG]
    these big hammers are useful when you need them, all i have here besides this 16 is an 8 pound. this is some of that hickory i got last month and it's just now checked enough to split it a little, right now i have this one split into 1 half and 2 quarters, just trying to figure out the best way to cut it, @quinton what do you think?
     
  10. quinton

    quinton

    Nov 4, 2006
    Depending on how big the round is.. Work around each half splitting off staves that are big enough to make handles. If you prefer white sapwood handles split the heartwood off of each stave.

    I leave the bark on my staves to slow the drying a little to avoid cracking. Sometimes I paint the ends of each stave, and sometimes I cut them extra long so I can trim the checking off each end after they are dry. I hope I have helped.
     
    Fmont, Yankee Josh, rjdankert and 2 others like this.
  11. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    Mar 31, 2016
    oh yeah right i gotta paint the ends, this stuff isnt cut too long. this one is oblong so it's gonna be a trick to get the right orientation on a few of them
     
    Yankee Josh and quinton like this.
  12. A17

    A17

    883
    Jan 9, 2018
    Not quite what it was "ment" for but it excelled at it anyways. My 6 yr old brothers pride and joy, a 4.5lb ATCO W. Germany axe splitting up a fatwood stump to expedite it's removal. Next to it is Pirate my assistant along with some sledges so bust apart and break free the individual pieces.
    [​IMG]
     
  13. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    Mar 31, 2016
    that is one buff kid
     
    Square_peg and A17 like this.
  14. A17

    A17

    883
    Jan 9, 2018
    If it makes you feel better Phantom, he can't even stick it into a log.:D It was given to him as just a head by a friend so I hafted it for him. However, he shows no signs of wanting to get rid of it despite the fact he can't even lift it over his head.
     
  15. muleman77

    muleman77

    410
    Jan 24, 2015
    3 lb Kelly Perfect, on a 30" octagon.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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  16. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    That's a good clean line for the mouth cut. No surprises that way.
     
    Yankee Josh and muleman77 like this.
  17. KiwiBloke

    KiwiBloke

    386
    Oct 2, 2018
    Spent a good few hours today removing 4 stumps from the back lawn. Roots were deep and stubborn and with them being smack bang up against the wall which separates the courtyard and the lawn it was also very hard not to put a tool through the bloody thing! I should have taken a before photo of when the trees were still there but you literally couldn't see that wall or house from that angle, it was completely covered in foliage. I needed to take the trees out as you can see it was starting to damage it.

    [​IMG]

    Now here is where the axe comes in..

    I would never imagine taking an axe to dirt for all the reasons that we cringe over and painstakingly try to educate others of too however today I was in a real bind. There was one root (you could call it a limb it was so thick and dense) that was growing out of the stump and under the wall towards the courtyard and leaving a gap of only about 5 inches between the stump and the wall; that sucker was holding the stump in like concrete. I could not see any other way to remove the stump other than chopping the root in half to free it; the tool needed to be thin yet powerful and able to be swung parallel to the wall into the gap.. an AXE!

    Now, I have an axe lying around that my father gave me, it is a budget Chinese axe that I chucked into the corner of the shed, laughed off, and truly thought I would never pick it up again. Why would you when you have high quality USA vintage users? And today I found a reason to have it as part of my tool selection - It is perfect for cutting thick roots in the ground. I know you are all aware of the sacrilege that is taking an axe to the dirt but I am interested if anyone else has an axe that they use solely for 'dirty' work? I was chuffed with this guy.

    [​IMG]

    And here is the rest of the root that will remain as there is nothing I can do about it, will cover it back up with dirt. I wonder how far it goes into the courtyard (which is tiled). I also used my trusty adze for stump removal which to be honest has never been used for anything but just that. It is common for New Zealand households to have one of these which is only ever used for nasty work such as this; colloquially it is known as a 'Ground Grubber' or simply 'Grubba'.

    [​IMG]

    Thanks for reading and hope you are all well.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2018
  18. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    KiwiBloke, Yankee Josh and A17 like this.
  19. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    Jul 25, 2017
    I use a cutter mattock, but I do have a yellow fiberglass 3 1/2lb Michigan that was gifted one weekend after I helped a friend install alot of fence line. I havent used it yet, but it may just be the answer for the root and stump work here too:thumbsup::cool:
    Sadly no pictures of the yellow princess and the matching maul it came with.

    Coincidentally I just gifted this import to a friend who needed an axe exclusively for stumps and roots for installing patios and walks.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    :cool:
     
  20. John A. Larsen

    John A. Larsen

    Jan 15, 2001
    I also have a cheap Chinese made axe I specifically bought to chop roots from a tree in our front yard. When I was in High School, our European Birch got bend completely over in a very bad ice storm we had. I had to cut it down, as my Father was at Sea. That was the easy part, cutting it down and into sections small enough for me to carry to the log pile. The stump/root mass was another thing. I dug and chopped roots, dug some more chopped some more, and on and on. Finally a neighbor who had a tow truck, backed up and attached a cable to the stump/root mass and pulled. No luck, but with him pulling and me chopping as more and more roots came into view we finally got the root stump/root mass out. John
     
    A17, KiwiBloke, Miller '72 and 2 others like this.

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