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Pancake Sheaths and how I go about them. (PIC HEAVY)

Discussion in 'Sheaths & Such' started by Horsewright, Feb 17, 2015.

  1. DadsGlasses

    DadsGlasses

    43
    Aug 11, 2017
    Thanks so much for the amazing tutorial, and thank you to Paul for recommending it. I am definitely going to try this.
     
    Horsewright likes this.
  2. Horsewright

    Horsewright KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 4, 2011
    Ya bet. Give me a shout if I can be of assistance. @DadsGlasses
     
    gruntinhusaybah likes this.
  3. gruntinhusaybah

    gruntinhusaybah KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jan 1, 2006
    hey Dave, first off thank you so much for putting this together!

    It’s probably not a problem for you, but my leather keeps getting dirty/dingy as I’m working on it. What do you recommend and a product and a process for cleaning it up before finishing the sheaths?

    Also, do you let the sheath dry completely before going into the oven, or is damp ok for this step?

    Last, why the paper? Why not a baking sheet?

    Thanks!

    @Horsewright
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2018
  4. mitch4ging

    mitch4ging Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 16, 2015
    Sorry brother, I think you sent this to the wrong guy.
     
  5. gruntinhusaybah

    gruntinhusaybah KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jan 1, 2006
    Huh? I'm just replying to his tutorial with a question. I'm confused
     
  6. Horsewright

    Horsewright KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 4, 2011
    Ya bet @gruntinhusaybah.

    I do struggle with that by the way. I have one shop and as a knife maker I try to keep the dirty all on one side. But Tehachapi where I live is a windy dusty place. Just is, so its a fight. Couple of things I do. One make suer your hands are clean when working with leather. I'll wash just before starting. Two make sure your workspace is clean as well. I have a large brush I dust everything off with before starting and then I use a "green" cleaner and spray the benches, rock and cutting boards down and wipe off with paper towels. Three even with this ya'll still get the occasional smudge or mark or what the heck. I have a galleon jug of Behr All in One Wood Cleaner from Home Depot. I will dampen a paper towel with it and you'd be surprised at the smudges etc it will take off. Rinse with another paper towel in plain water. Four sometime its your water. We're on well water and I struggled more with this before I started using Pro Carv in the water. It made a big difference for me. I know folks that will only use distilled water. Five good leather. Seems like the USA leathers are less susceptible to these problems than the imports. I did have a side of HO one time that everytime you got it wet white waxy stuff would come to the surface of the leather. Returned it and they were testing it and had the same problems. But it seems to happen less with the better leathers.

    No I only bake damp items. Thats part of the idea as it helps set your shape and also drys from the inside out I believe. Paper because damp leather and a baking sheet probably would not be good.
     
    gruntinhusaybah likes this.
  7. gruntinhusaybah

    gruntinhusaybah KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jan 1, 2006
    @Horsewright man thank you so much! I’ve got an ALMOST finished sheath and I cannot tell you how helpful all this has been!
    I’ll post up some pictures when it’s done!

    Thanks again!
    If you ever find yourself around San Diego beers on me!
     
    mitch4ging and Horsewright like this.
  8. Horsewright

    Horsewright KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 4, 2011
    Ya bet buddy!
     
  9. v8r

    v8r

    558
    Mar 6, 2009
    Horsewright,
    If I’ve never told ya how much this tutorial has helped me.....thank you very much. If i could figure out how to post stuff to this forum i would send you some pics.
     
    Horsewright and mitch4ging like this.
  10. Horsewright

    Horsewright KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 4, 2011
    Thanks, glad its been of help. Its pretty easy to post pics.. Make an Imgur account. Drag and drop your pics there. Then open a pic ya want to post, copy the BB code, then paste in the the post here in BF.
     
  11. gruntinhusaybah

    gruntinhusaybah KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jan 1, 2006
    Not perfect, but I'm very happy with the progress and learned a ton! The next one will be better! Thank you so much for sharing hard won knowledge so freely!
    Merry Christmas!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2019
    mitch4ging, Horsewright and ANovinc like this.
  12. Horsewright

    Horsewright KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 4, 2011
    Good deal! Glad this helped out. Looks pretty good to me. Inlay your stitching groove a little further farther in. Will give ya a little more room to work with when the occasional wobblies in the stitching happen.
     
    gruntinhusaybah likes this.
  13. gruntinhusaybah

    gruntinhusaybah KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jan 1, 2006
    Yessir!
    Did that bit backwardso_O like I said, learned a ton!
     
    Horsewright likes this.
  14. Diomedes Industries

    Diomedes Industries Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 19, 2007
    Dave,

    I looked this thread up a few times lately - and I have a few follow up questions.

    In your original post I saw that you skive your welt with a head knife. I was having trouble, though, seeing what you skive. I think you are skiving the welt down to the edge of the sheath - so that there is a welt on the interior but the exterior (edge of the sheath) is only two layers. Am I reading that right?

    Also, your slot punch - can you tell me what make and length that is that you use? It looks like 1 3/4" but I wanted to check.

    Lastly - I searched for you Rough Out tutorial - but I can't seem to locate it - do you remember what you titled it?

    Thank you so much for your time.

    Jason
     
    gruntinhusaybah likes this.
  15. Horsewright

    Horsewright KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 4, 2011

    Howdy Jason

    On the skiving I will pre skive the edge of the welt, the tip where it meets up with the apex of the sheath. This is to get a smooth transition from two layers on the top of the sheath to the three layers on the bottom, front back and welt. I don't always get the placement right or the skive right and will do any additional skiving needed on the welt after its been glued on the top but before glueing the top and welt onto the bottom. This is where I'll careful use the long end of my roundknife to skive that clean. i can do that with the roundknife with more of a slicing action rather than a pushing action to save cutting into the top layer of the sheath.

    I use Weaver 2" slot/bag punch for that. Most belts are 1.5" so the 2" size seems to work just right. Weaver, (although I'm not a fan of their new business practices, the company that starts with a W and shall not be mentioned) hands down makes the best punches I have ever used. They have however broken the cowboy code and are deeply frowned upon in my world.

    I'll see if I can find it and bump it to the front page. Nothing super special though really outside of picking a piec of roughout ya like. Just do everything inside out.
     
    gruntinhusaybah likes this.
  16. gruntinhusaybah

    gruntinhusaybah KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jan 1, 2006
    Ooh there's a roughout tutorial too? Nice!
     
    Horsewright likes this.

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