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Pistol for first time owner?

Discussion in 'Gadgets & Gear' started by SuzukiGS750EZ, Mar 27, 2017.

  1. Boxer .45

    Boxer .45 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 11, 2015
    Well, although many states do have specific regulations that's not why guns have safeties. For instance the 1911 has had a safety for over 100 years and S&W has been putting safeties on guns for a very long time, simply because some shooters prefer them and before firing pin safties it was just one more way to insure safety. I don't have a problem with people that enjoy the safety and even have a few guns with them myself.

    Key locks are due to political pressure on gun manufacturers. If they were smart they would only sell their guns to the free states anyway since most states that require them end up outlawing the guns anyway and the rest of us still have to put up with the extra bs including key locks, extra cost due to microstamping, etc. but really all of this is getting a little off topic so I digress. :)
     
  2. SuzukiGS750EZ

    SuzukiGS750EZ

    Dec 30, 2008
    None, firearms anyways. I've handled bb/ pellet guns that are replicas to weight and size. But never carried it on my person, just for fun.
     
  3. Charlie_K

    Charlie_K

    Jul 16, 2012
    Maybe just a little bit, but the point remains the same that the safety is no substitute for good old common sense. Keep your booger hook away from the bang switch and you won't have any problems.
     
  4. Boxer .45

    Boxer .45 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 11, 2015
    Nobody had experience before their first time. Just know the basic firearm safety rules, know the parts of the gun you have and what they do. Practice without ammo. Go over the safety rules in your head before and while handling. Practice and then when your ready go to the range and practice firing. Keep your finger off the trigger until your ready to fire and remove it every time your done firing.

    Don't know many people that carry a gun for "fun". Range time can be fun, but it is still serious and so is carrying one.

    If you know another shooter they can teach you, paid instruction isn't a bad thing but not necessary. Do your research and make sure those your learning from know what they are doing.
     
  5. Steven65

    Steven65 Traditional Hog Platinum Member

    Mar 11, 2008
    ^^This advice is excellent. So many great choices out there today. Its all about what you shoot best in both model and calibre.

    Personally I would opt for a Glock 19, but that is because I have CC'd a Glock for many years. I love it and trust it.

    Good luck with your search and post some pics when you finally decide.:)
     
  6. Boxer .45

    Boxer .45 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 11, 2015
    Well I agree with that. :) A safety isn't a pass for complacency, but it can be extra security when holstering.
     
  7. SuzukiGS750EZ

    SuzukiGS750EZ

    Dec 30, 2008
    I meant when it came out of a drawer, it was for plinking, it never left the yard. Its a 1911. So I know I don't want that size! lol. I know gun safety, I was taught at an early age. But my lessons were to keep me safe, not for me to shoot.
     
  8. SuzukiGS750EZ

    SuzukiGS750EZ

    Dec 30, 2008
    What are the chances a gun holstered will go bang? Not being a jerk, its a serious question. Did I go safety or not? Loaded when carry or not. So much to do...
     
  9. Boxer .45

    Boxer .45 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 11, 2015
    Always carry your gun loaded or it's worthless, you don't have time to rack your gun when an unexpected BG points a gun at you. Modern guns have multiple inner safeties that prevent discharge if dropped, as long as it's in a holster you should be confident it's not going to just go off, you would have to pull the trigger.

    I prefer no external safety on a handgun, I often carry my Glock 19. Some people prefer safeties and some don't. If you have a safety you have to make it part of your practice regiment. Some people feel safer holstering a gun if it has an external safety because they are concerned the trigger may be pulled when holstering, personally I just take more care when holstering.
     
  10. jaseman

    jaseman

    603
    Jul 28, 2016
    ^^ This ^^

    As a first time owner, you'll get a lot of info, from a lot of different people. Some of it good, and unfortunately, some of it blatantly false. Best thing you can do is do your own research from trusted sources, and if possible, take a class from an NRA certified instructor. I don't know what your state's requirements are, but there is no substitute for trigger time under the supervision of a good instructor.

    Some good, indisputable (hopefully) info....

    Know and practice the four rules of firearm safety
    1. Treat all guns as if they are loaded. At all times. More accidents happen when people assume a firearm is unloaded than anything else. Check, recheck, and double check, every time, whether someone is handing it to you from out of a case, or it's your own gun and you're just cleaning in. If you treat it as if it's loaded, you will be less likely to break the other 3 rules.

    2. Never point a gun at anything you are not willing to destroy or kill. Loaded or not (rule #1) you can't hurt someone or something important if the gun isn't pointed in their direction. Handing it too/from a sales clerk, muzzle down, pointed in a safe location. Pulling it from the safe to show a friend - same thing.

    3. Keep your finger off the trigger until your sights are on target and you're ready to fire. A properly functioning, modern firearm will not fire without pulling the trigger. Anytime the pistol is in your hand, your finger should be outside the trigger guard until you plan to fire. Even if, lord forbid, you are intentionally pointing it at a 'bad-guy', you can't accidentally shoot them until your finger is on the trigger.

    4. Know your target, and know what is beyond it. Are you sure of what you're pointing your gun at, and it's something you want to shoot? (rule #2) Do you know what is behind it in the line of fire? Paper targets don't stop bullets. Neither does drywall, curtains, bushes, or many other things. Once the bullet leaves the barrel, you can't take it back. A proper shooting range has a backstop designed to stop projectiles, but if your shooting cans off the fence, what's beyond that fence? Is it ten acres of your own farmland, or is there a hiking trail just beyond the tree line? Even if you're being threatened by an attacker, is there a concrete wall behind him or a couple of scared kids? You are responsible for every shot you fire, so make sure you know where it's going to end up.




    Have a good, working knowledge of your state's firearm laws. This one's tough, because laws aren't written in easy to understand language most times, they sometimes contradict themselves, and every state's laws are different. It's very easy for a law abiding citizen to accidentally run afoul of gun laws, and ignorance of them is no excuse in court. Know exactly where you can and can't legally carry. Know exactly how you can carry, and what you need to do so. Know how you must secure them, and what your responsibility in doing so is, under the law. But don't, don't, trust anyone else's opinion, except that of a lawyer well versed in firearm laws of your state. Most people think they know the laws based on what they've overheard over the years, but have never bothered to research them themselves. They've heard bad info from their brother-in-law, neighbor, or a guy at the shooting range, or even at a gun store. Heck, even many officers are unaware of the actual laws they are trying to enforce (this is not to bash cops, but it is true). Often, you're hearing more opinion than fact from people trying to discuss law with you. There's a lot of misinformation out there. Do your own research, and keep yourself on the right side of the law.


    Owning and carrying a firearm is a big responsibility, treat it as such. Let's face it, we're not talking about owning and carrying a cellphone. We're talking about an item whose primary design function is to throw a lead projectile at extreme velocity with lethal force. When that item has your name on the paperwork, ultimately YOU are responsible for everything associated with it, as well as the image you portray. I know this seems like common sense, but it bears being said.


    I know this was a little off-topic, but hopefully it'll help you as you move forward with buying a firearm, and eventually carrying one. Too many newbies are just handed the receipt for their new gun, and just left to their own devices with little or no guidance.
     
    Deinos likes this.
  11. Boxer .45

    Boxer .45 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 11, 2015
    +1...
     
  12. Charlie_K

    Charlie_K

    Jul 16, 2012
    So long as you're keeping your finger clear of the trigger when holstering, not much at all. Avoid the Blackhawk Serpa holsters for such a reason, their Sportster is a better option when going with them. Safeties can get in the way and be switched on by mistake at the worst possible time, depending on what the setup is. Training can sometimes alleviate this, but that's not a guarantee.

    Carrying an unloaded gun, or at least carrying it with an empty chamber, is dubbed the Israeli carry method, mainly because the Israeli army -at least from what I've been told- has neither the time nor funding to adequately teach uneducated masses how to safely handle a loaded firearm. You suffer from no such shortcomings, and thus have no need to abide by such.
     
  13. shaving sharp

    shaving sharp Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 19, 2007
    There is some good info. here and some bad. I will tell you this! I am a 30 year law enforcement officer, certified range instructor, armorer, and gun collector. Before you take your carry class you should take a hunter safety course so you can learn about the safe handling of firearms and all the different types. Then go and take a firearms course where you get some actual range time to shoot and understand the safe handling of different types of firearms. Once you do all that then you can make an informed decision on your purchase. In my opinion a concealed carry class does not give enough instruction to someone who is not very familar with firearms.
     
  14. Charlie_K

    Charlie_K

    Jul 16, 2012
    I haven't found a comfortable, effective method of concealing the 19 yet, so I'm currently going with the 26. But the beauty of that is you can carry a spare 19 or 17 magazine in case the 11 to 13 rounds in the 26 is insufficient for whatever reason.

    I actually never took a hunter safety course. Although I was serious about learning, and was a quick study when I discovered the four rules of firearms safety. I learned most of what I know from the experienced folks over at The Box o' Truth, and good old fashioned practice.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2017
  15. Steven65

    Steven65 Traditional Hog Platinum Member

    Mar 11, 2008
    I actually carry a 17 and have done so every day for the past 16 years.

    I use a Horsehide Crossbreed Supertuck which I have set up for a deeper IWB carry position. With a slightly baggy shirt the gun disappears without printing.

    It's not for everyone but it works well for me.
     
  16. SuzukiGS750EZ

    SuzukiGS750EZ

    Dec 30, 2008
    I already have, albeit it was 18 years ago, i still keep those rules in the back of my head :) and than you for your insight. Nice to hear from somebody out there everyday
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2017
  17. SuzukiGS750EZ

    SuzukiGS750EZ

    Dec 30, 2008
    Any thoughts on gun belts/ brands as well as holsters? Looking at m&p 9 or m&p 2.0
     
  18. Charlie_K

    Charlie_K

    Jul 16, 2012
    Brands of holsters will be affected by open or concealed carry, and how you intend to do either or both.
     
  19. Dddrees

    Dddrees

    794
    Dec 13, 2015
    Currently I have no actual experience with carrying, however Hanks Belts supposedly have some pretty nice belts. I went with their premium belts which are twice as thick as most belts out there. They also have some belts which are reinforced with other materials such as Kydex. I am also Considering getting a few Stealth Gear holsters.
     
  20. SuzukiGS750EZ

    SuzukiGS750EZ

    Dec 30, 2008
    My state allows either but I plan to conceal
     

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