PLEASE POST YOUR TRADITIONAL GERMAN FIXED BLADES & POCKET KNIVES,

ed_is_dead

Basic Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2010
Messages
375
An interesting addition to my collection of Richartz. By collection I mean I managed to find a second! Would love more.

I can find absolutely zilch info online or another picture of this type. Can you?

Very quaint and well aimed at the British market with the "Right - O". The "Superior German Make" is noteworthy also:)

Took a bit of fettling to eliminate the blade rap and centre the blade, but its sweet as a nut now and takes an indecent edge. Perfect little guy for the Johnny pocket.
Hope yall like it as much as I do.







 

wouter1967

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2009
Messages
479
Two Puma slipjoints from the 1970's.

Vin-PUMA_675(1).jpg


Vin-PUMA_620.jpg
 
Last edited:
Joined
Mar 11, 2017
Messages
270
I have a similar knife made by Toro in Solingen, many firms made the same models after the war and imported to the states. Mine is weird in that it has the word for Germany in Spanish, Alemania on the other side, so I wonder if it was made for the Spanish market by a German firm, and just made “Toro” on the knife to indicate distribution to Spain or other Spanish speaking countries.
Apologies, I've just noticed this comment. As you say, there were plenty of manufacturers of these knives in Germany. As to the Spanish markings, during the first 30 yeras of the last century, German cutlers made lots of knives for South American countries ( Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay,etc), Herder and Boker among others.
 
Joined
Mar 11, 2017
Messages
270
Couple of German grafting knives: Kamphaus (tang stamp shows maker, origin, model number and handle length), scales seem to be some kind of bakelite. Becro-Belzer, (tang stamp shows maker, blade stamp shows model and handle length), scales are ebony, with noticeable crack starting at pivot pin, only on the mark side. Old guy.

z6h0W3.jpg


feMf7o.jpg
 

Campbellclanman

Platinum Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2007
Messages
12,740
There have been some very fine Pumas put up on this Thread- Thank you for sharing ! Lambertianas latest additions are awesome- I like that Stag Jagermeister type!
That Weidmannsheil is a Beauty B1gshot!
 
Last edited:

danno50

Gold Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2008
Messages
1,048
An interesting addition to my collection of Richartz. By collection I mean I managed to find a second! Would love more.

I can find absolutely zilch info online or another picture of this type. Can you?

Very quaint and well aimed at the British market with the "Right - O". The "Superior German Make" is noteworthy also:)

Took a bit of fettling to eliminate the blade rap and centre the blade, but its sweet as a nut now and takes an indecent edge. Perfect little guy for the Johnny pocket.
Hope yall like it as much as I do.







That is the best RIchartz I have seen! Most of what I find here are the Sheffield made shell handled ones (Richards). I did have on bone handled RIchartz harness jack, but traded it off to another collector.
 

danno50

Gold Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2008
Messages
1,048
A lot of other great knives posted since I was here last as well. Jeff, I really like that Fight'n Rooster stag handled Eureka jack with the interesting shield placement.:thumbsup:
 

ed_is_dead

Basic Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2010
Messages
375
That is the best RIchartz I have seen! Most of what I find here are the Sheffield made shell handled ones (Richards). I did have on bone handled RIchartz harness jack, but traded it off to another collector.
Hi Danno, yeah it's a charming and unusual little guy isn't it. The "Right O" makes it for me. Would love to understand the No 123 better. Perhaps there is other patterns with other numbers?
 

danno50

Gold Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2008
Messages
1,048
Hi Danno, yeah it's a charming and unusual little guy isn't it. The "Right O" makes it for me. Would love to understand the No 123 better. Perhaps there is other patterns with other numbers?
Information from Carter's "German Knife and Sword Maker 1850 to 1945" indicates the Right-O" mark was registered in 1922. I have no idea on the 123. Richartz was one of the largest manufacturers in Solingen in the early 1920s. Perhaps H herder might have a Richartz catalogue?
 

black mamba

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2009
Messages
18,496
Fight'n Rooster stag handled Eureka jack with the interesting shield placement.
Thanks, Dan. I've had a running argument with myself what to call that pattern; is it a round bolstered gunstock, or an oddly shaped Eureka, or a serpentine swell center, or . . . you get my drift. What would you call it???
 

danno50

Gold Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2008
Messages
1,048
Thanks, Dan. I've had a running argument with myself what to call that pattern; is it a round bolstered gunstock, or an oddly shaped Eureka, or a serpentine swell center, or . . . you get my drift. What would you call it???
I am certainly no expert on pattern names. Looking at LGIV, I would call it a "slightly different shaped Eureka jack".
 

Will Power

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2007
Messages
27,395
ed_is_dead ed_is_dead I too admire your Richartz a finely turned out little knife, in contrast to most of the cheap English made Richards junk ;) It seems to have a stamped blade, a quality touch found on French & German knives, much less so or, it appears to have gone into abeyance, on English knives. Opens out straight and fine, no 'cant' on it.

Can't help you with the No.123 referencing, is it a pattern or a sequence- one, two, three?

Here's an amusing cutting from a 1925 Guardian article deploring language degradation and the common use of right-O! in everyday speech. This suggests it was a recent introduction and might have its origins in the recent Great War? Or a popular song? Who knows. But I suspect it's near extinct slang now in Britain.

 
Top