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Rare !!!Plumb axe help dating and other information

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Yarin, Feb 15, 2016.

  1. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    Thank you Agent_H. Lots of goodies and info to scrutinize in there. Mentions in a 1922 ad that the 'take up' wedge was patented Aug 15 1922 and prominent mention of these wedges in ads disappears outright between May of 1943, which does feature them and April of 1944 which doesn't. Also the Plumb 'mahoganized' (that's what they call it) wood colour and black head finish had come into use already in 1919.
     
  2. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013


    This is really cool, Thank you Steve Tall!


    Thanks 300six. It’s not pretty like the work provided by “Steve Tall Productions”
     
  3. quinton

    quinton

    Nov 4, 2006
    Yes, thank you Agent_H! A lot of fun work involved in that very informable post..
     
  4. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    What I have also learned from catalogue illustrations in this thread is that the head pictured below is not a Plumb 'CEDAR' pattern, such as we have been referring to these, but rather a 'NATIONAL'. Although this particular Plumb 3 1/2 lb has no 'take up' wedge nor Permabond the previously guesstimated age (between 1945 and 1955) obviously doesn't hold water anymore.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG][/URL]
     
  5. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    The Plumb National axes weren't introduced until 1948 (copyright date, and ads found), so that narrows it down a little.


    Catalog of Copyright Entries: Third series - Page 153
    https://books.google.com/books?id=yk8hAQAAIAAJ
    1948 - ‎Read
    Here's the new Plumb National axe. (Axes) Folder. © 10Sep48; KK26883.


     
    Agent_H likes this.
  6. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
  7. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010

    That's the same copyright listing that I just posted from 1948 (note the copyright date © 10Sep48). The book listed as 1947 must contain more than one year.
     
    Agent_H likes this.
  8. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    I saw that it was the same photo in reference, just saw the 1947 and thought it placed it there abouts.

    Kind of wonder when they stopped making them in that pattern.

    They make for nice looking axes.
     
  9. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    I was trolling through the Boy’s Life archives and happened on to a “Super Scout Axe” reference/picture that sure looks like it has the beveled poll of the National pattern. This was in 1971.

    "Plumb Ad." Boy's Life Mar. 1971: 12. Print. Plumb Ad, Super Scout Axe, Permabond

    [​IMG]


    Little Closer look

    [​IMG]
     
  10. halfaxe

    halfaxe

    Nov 29, 2012
    I believe Plumb put that same head on the National, Super Scout and other brands.


    Excellent thread guys.
     
  11. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    I'm thinking that they are both the National pattern, but in different weights (along with the "Pack Axe"). The three of them resemble National pattern more than they do the Cedar pattern.

    From a BSA ad:
    Pack Axe, 1-1/4# head, 13-1/2" handle
    Super Scout axe, 1-3/4 lb. head, 24" handle
    Explorer axe, 2-1/4# lb. head, 26-1/2" handle
     
    Agent_H likes this.
  12. Thomas Linton

    Thomas Linton

    Jun 16, 2003
    Some "Super Scout" axes have beveled a poll and some do not.
     
  13. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013

    OEM Haft on the 'National' photos featured earlier does not have a clipped foot. Nor Permabond!

    [​IMG]
     
  14. quinton

    quinton

    Nov 4, 2006
    Good question, 300. What time frame was the clipped foot introduced?
     
  15. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    Alocksly has previously posted some photos from his copy of Official Scout Blades by Ed Holbrook. The different axes are pictured, along with approximate years they were used by the Scouts. There's even an official Girl Scout hatchet, with a green head and GSA emblem.

     
    Agent_H likes this.
  16. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    The reason I posted an unclipped fawn's foot picture of an OEM handle on a National is because the 1971 Plumb ad only shows clipped foot handles. Handles from ads in the 20s and 30s are quite a bit more distinctive (much like the ones that COTS currently creates) than post WWII. Etc Etc. Could well be that handle profiles on 'unmolested' Plumbs are a way they can be age dated more reliably than wedge types or lack thereof.
     
  17. Yarin

    Yarin

    9
    Feb 15, 2016
    Thanks for the information!!!
     
  18. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    Some more data, to add to the mix. A price sheet for Plumb axes, dated 1964. "Permabond Assembly" is listed for Jet Wing, Dreadnaught, and National brands.

    The Plumb All American axes have no mention of Permabond. (They are available in Dayton, Jersey, Kentucky, Michigan, Swamping, and Western patterns, at $48/dozen, in contrast with the $60 and up cost listed for Jet Wing and Dreadnaught).

    [​IMG]
     
    Agent_H likes this.
  19. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    Unfortunately you have nothing definitive to work with but it's neither very old (pre 44 with 'take up' wedge) nor very new (post 81) IMO. That there is no Permabond means it's a utility model (or made between 44 and 56) and not high end. Knob end (instead of fawns foot) handles (seems to me) were fashionable in the 50s. I think it's fairly safe to guesstimate mid 50s for this +/- and not be challenged. The head is nicely sculpted and finished and it was carefully hung. Craftsmanship definitely began to decline starting in the 1960s.
    Hang it on the wall as a keepsake and keep your eye open for another one that you can actually use without depreciating the value.
     
    Agent_H likes this.
  20. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Nice work Steve. Very legible and a great resource.
     

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