Photos Stanley Axes, Hatchets, Tools - Show & Tell

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Feb 1, 2012
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I've used a small Stanley block plane like that many times to fix doors. Sometimes a building will settle unevenly and the hinge side of a door frame will drop lower than the latch side. When this happens the latch side will rub on the header.

The low angle of these block planes work well on both the stile (cross-grain cut) and rail (with grain cut). I wedge the door in a convenient position and work from the latch edge toward the center to avoid chipping the veneer. I start by beveling the two sides, again to protect the veneer. Hold the plane at a 45° angle to the door corner and skewed up, yet again to protect the veneer. Once the veneer has been beveled then work the center down. The front edge can be worked down starting each corner and working in. Never let the plane exit over an end corner or it will tear the veneer. With a razor sharp plane it's pretty quick to remove 1/16" to 1/8" off the top of a door. Usually you could feather it out over 8-12 inches and that would get the door closing right. Then you might take the bevel back further just to give the illusion of an even reveal all across the top of the door.

Power planes are faster but they are noisy and they throw dust everywhere. And they are more likely to chip the veneer.
 
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Jul 25, 2017
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Found this thread deep back at page 11 ;)

I have recently brought home several more Stanley pieces, this one in particular I am pretty excited to include...

20190111-203755.jpg


With blade guard and yes...new replacement blades still stored inside:cool:
 

rjdankert

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Mar 10, 2011
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These were my dads:




How old are they? Well, I don't really know. Dad had them for as long as I can remember. My best guess is that he got them after WWII ended when he came home from the South Pacific. I don't really want to divulge my age, but mom and dad did not waste any time popping me in the oven after he got home.;)

Bob
 
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Jul 25, 2017
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These were my dads:




How old are they? Well, I don't really know. Dad had them for as long as I can remember. My best guess is that he got them after WWII ended when he came home from the South Pacific. I don't really want to divulge my age, but mom and dad did not waste any time popping me in the oven after he got home.;)

Bob

Thank you Bob.
It's always a pleasure to share in the tools of someone's dad, grandad, mom; tools simply handed down in ones family.
More special that you still have and use when needed.
:):cool:
 
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Jul 25, 2017
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2,300
Got this Stanley SW 246 yesterday with a Disston 26x4 saw. The lady that I got it from said her father got it in the 1920's when he built their family home.








Bob

That is beautiful Bob. A great find and great history. Its lucky to have found it's new home.
I love the bold etch still remaining on your 26" saw.
Oh what a beauty sir!
 

Old Axeman

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Jan 10, 2015
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937
Miller-- your post of the Stanley 299 utility knife brought back a memory. I have a very similar 199. Stanley used to call them Razor Blade Knives and advertise them for use as Fibre Board Tools. But in the trades, at least 50+ years ago, they were referred to as "Gyp Knife" by the old carpenters. As in Gypsum board, one of the uses they were designed for.
 
Joined
Mar 19, 2012
Messages
292
Can anyone give me information on a Stanley No. 73-10inch Brace made in England that I recently acquired for the princely sum of about 7 US Dollars.
The Brace is complete and in good condition only the wooden parts have lost the black paint.
I would specifically like to know approximately when the brace was made and if it was considered a good tool for its time.
I am unfortunately unable to post a picture.
Many thanks.
 
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