STRIDER BT Destruction Test Video completed.

Yeah, you were called a lot of things, and guess what, you deserve each and every one of them. As for being "THREATENED" you, how, pray tell, were you threatened? Can you specifically show how you were threatened? I guess not, but I'm pretty sure your paranoid/delusional mind will just come up with an excuse and say stupid stuff like that again. As for being a big boy, you at least had that right. Your a big "boy"! :barf:

Geez, I wonder what contribution you made? Oh, I know, it's that people shouldn't take any sort of drugs, especially expecting mothers, since it will not be good for the children. And yeah, way to show you have guts by wearing a mask! :jerkit: :foot: :jerkit:

I doubt that!! :yawn: :yawn: :yawn:

Grow up and get a life! :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

It sounds like your the one that needs to grow up. Just read what you wrote. It says it all
You have some real intelligent thoughts to add don't you.
about the threat read my original post "your post" last page before it disappears.
 
noss4
I think many people here are just jealous because they cant afford to destroy so many knives. Like I said before, keep them coming!
 
Punisher is here just to take a shit on your thread. Don´t respond to him.

Like I said, I liked the test very much, I am still watching it.
 
I've heard a lot of stories about how brittle S30V is and this puts that to rest for me.

Keep in mind that the grind of the knife has a GREAT deal to do with how it performs under such stresses. This is 1/4" stock with maybe a 2/3 height grind on a fairly narrow blade that comes out very thick behind the edge--any steel under the sun will stand up to a lot of abuse with that kind of geometry. I've enjoyed watching these videos and I think they present some interesting contrasts between different designs for hard-use knives, but please don't try to draw any quantitative conclusions about steel performance from them--there are too many (to the Nth degree) variables here between the test subjects. My point being that if you duplicated the Strider's grinds out of D2, 420J2, 5160, ATS-34, S5 shock steel and cold-rolled welding stock from Lowe's--ALL of them would hold up very well, because there's a HELL of a lot of steel there supporting the edge. With a thinner edge, though, the differences in these steels would become apparent quickly.

For a comparative analysis between steel types, ALL of the test blades would need to be ground exactly the same way to the same dimensions--and the tests performed with more than one example of each. I'm well aware that this would be cost prohibitive for the majority of us, but that doesn't change the fact that it would be the only way to pull meaningful data away from it in terms of which steel does what better.

Another way to put it is that I can absolutely guarantee you that a $38.00 Buck Special from Walmart will outcut that Strider all day long in normal slicing tasks. Does this mean that the 420HC Buck uses is "superior" to S30V? No. That it holds an edge better? No. It means that thinner edge geometry will always outcut thicker edge geometry, regardless of steel type. What I'd really like to see, here, is those exact Strider grinds made out of 420HC to run off with the S30V. I have a very strong feeling many here would not like the results of that comparison. Or, duplicate that Kabar out of S30V (down to the square-shouldered, rat-tail tang) at the same stock thickness, and see how it holds up compared the the 1095 model.

Don't get me wrong, S30V is a good blade steel, but it is far from being the jack-of-all-trades material that they try to make it out to be. I'm not saying the Striders are not tough, but it has a whole lot more to do with their geometry than it does their materials choice. I've used S30V blades from Spyderco and Camillus that I like very much, and they really do hold an edge well in extended cutting on materials that will dull many of my other pocketknives far more quickly. That said, they'll also consistently chip if I twist them to pop a staple loose from a shipping box, whereas my old carbon steel Camillus slipjoint won't even blink. Different steels have different attributes, and while S30V has many, toughness under hard use isn't high among them.

Edit to add: I think one of these Buck/Striders in 420HC would be an interesting one to throw into these comparisons. Doesn't quite match the Strider's grinds, as I believe its bevels are hollow versus the Strider's saber-grind and the serrations would not stand up to this use regardless of steel type, but still--a lot closer of a direct comparison with the Strider than many of these others.
http://images.channeladvisor.com/Sell/SSProfiles/60000131/Images/2/BU890TX.jpg
 
I think your videos are great! You spend the money out of pocket to show the rest of us what some of these knives can take. I can careless if you are wearing a pink afro with a purple tutu. Keep on the good work on taking these knives to the limit.

By a chance, do you think you will ever test some folders to see what they can do?

~Brian

I hope to test some folders as well give me some suggestions I will add them to my list.
 
First, thank you noss4. And talk about a surprise :eek:
And I mean the video being cut right before the moment the Strider broke.


Here are some observations:

1. I was very surprised to see such poor performance on cardboard and chopping wood. Maybe some of the more informed ones can readily explain why.

2. I found the concrete hammering quite impressive.

3. I was dissapointed there was no vice bending part.

4. The paracord handle failing both in durability and comfort came as no surprise.

5. My faith in S30V is restored. Well my faith in Strider's S30V is restored :)

6. With the paracord handle and non impressive wood/cardboard cutting/chopping performance, one can only imagine that most Striders are not meant for camp duties.


And please noss4, be careful with those stabs, I'd hate you to slide your hand to the blade while deanimating a garden chair...
 
I hope to test some folders as well give me some suggestions I will add them to my list.
You´re opening yet another can of worms :) Of course, you would have to make some changes in your methods. I think the main point of a folder destruction test would be to see what it takes for a lock to fail. Some locks have a very good reputation, so it would be nice to test an Axis lock to failure. And there are also some folders with a reputation for bad locks, like the liner lock of the Buck Strider Military. So yeah, I would like to see a test on the B/S Military.

I think I am gonna end up visiting your site a lot.
 
Were do I claim anywhere I want to be taken seriously. QUOTE]

I understand now. I would like to see you test a Walter Brend model 2. Can you do this?

I am compiling a list of knives from forum users. I will add Walter Brend model 2
to my list. I can't guarantee I will test any and every knife on my list but I will consider all.
 
Nice test, a knife has for me one purpose:to cut like hell and this one was a real loser.A prybar is less expensive.
 
First, thank you noss4. And talk about a surprise :eek:
And I mean the video being cut right before the moment the Strider broke.


Here are some observations:

1. I was very surprised to see such poor performance on cardboard and chopping wood. Maybe some of the more informed ones can readily explain why.

2. I found the concrete hammering quite impressive.

3. I was dissapointed there was no vice bending part.

4. The paracord handle failing both in durability and comfort came as no surprise.

5. My faith in S30V is restored. Well my faith in Strider's S30V is restored :)

6. With the paracord handle and non impressive wood/cardboard cutting/chopping performance, one can only imagine that most Striders are not meant for camp duties.

1. The thick blade/edge geometries are designed principally to be very robust, rather than maximized for cutting. Also, the large, full-exposed tangs make the balance very central, so that even though they're fairly heavy, they aren't really balanced for chopping. Any knife ground this way would perform similarly in chopping or slicing, regardless of who made it or out of what steel.

2. I liked that too, though again its ability to survive this use is a function of geometry. If it was shaped like a large nail it'd do even better.

3. I'd be surprised if he could bend it very far without aid from a pipe or some other type of lever-arm extender. Lots of blade there at full stock thickness.

4. Yep, no surprises. It does have the one saving grace of being relatively easy to replace without sending back to the factory.

5. Again, geometry geometry geometry.

6. I agree, I think they're primarily designed after fighters and then just beefed up to add indestructibility. The more central balance would contribute to this, making them faster or "livelier" in the hand than they'd be with a balance point farther out on the blade.
 
noss if you really want to do a contribution test this knife: www.darkopsknives.com/cgistore/store.cgi?page=/new/product.html&setup=1&ida=11&idp=3&his=0|3&cart_id=6713.2688

the darkops interceptor... just have a look at what it can do.. some quite bold statements here..

"It includes a patent pending Splitter Hilt™ which provides for cutting away harnesses and overhead cables"

that can be tested.

"Backsaw is optimized for cutting through plexiglass aircraft canopies or helo windows"

that too.

"its’ deployment and use is a great bar fight deterrent in exotic third world locales"

well i suppose you could test that too. mexico??

"Extended serrations aid underwater cutting efforts"

try it out.

"Notch design allows prybar style mechanical advantage for entry through aluminum vehicle rooftops"

that can be tested.

"Like all Dark Ops blades, the CTV2 steel will last for decades!"

wanna bet?

i´d love to see you test any darkops knife
 
Ya know what? I'd like to see you test a Dark ops stratofighter in all seriousness too. Nobody else will go near them based on the marketing, and you don't care about your knife "image", so that would be a good test, it would either make some eat crow(which they would never admit) or show that indeed, they are junk. Do it:thumbup:
 
I don't really care much about FB strength...as many others have said, huge amounts of steel tend to be way stronger than necessary, which can be discerned without testing. The amount of testing to really discern steel performance on these tests would be pretty difficult...I suppose you'd have to figure out the optimum grind angle for this job for each individual steel, and then find the right combination of blade thickness/secondary grind for each. Once pretty satisfied that everything's optimum for each seperate steel, you can test and see how they hold up.

But the issue of auxillary hypothesis comes up...where someone can reject the results just by saying that gring x wasn't right for infi/s30v/a2 whatever and then you have to regrind it their way to test it...

I'm sure Cliff has a ton of other factors to be taken into consideration, but I'd be fairly satisfied with these (of course, small sample sizes aren't very good for inductive reasoning....so you'd need maybe 10 of each to really satisfy the critics, but I understand why this is virtually impossible. Just try getting 10 Busses of the same kind at once....)

Of course, it seems like there's a lot of compromise involved when dealing with extreme testing...big performance in one area seems to cost big time in other areas.

I liked the notes about the paracord, etc--in quality FBs, I feel that the handle ergonomics and balance are really the main thing to talk about. Of course Strider/Busse/Rat etc etc are going to be tougher than I need....that goes without saying. Ergonomics, balance, the actual construction of the handle itself, this is where you can see important variation.

But, to your credit, you're not trying to do this with a folder, which seems to be the prevailing line of thought among n00bs.

But speaking of folders, and the vaunted (and fascinating) although somewhat irrelevent lock testing, I'd love to see a variety of tests on lock integrity. Strider has a top notch rep for frame locks, but I have a pretty good feeling that the toughest framelock is like a normal axis lock. Rukus/710 vs SMF vs Manix seems like an obvious comparison. I can give you a variety of relevant tests that might be encountered in the real world (the word "might" is being stretched pretty far here...), the various torqueing, different kinds of spine whacks, etc

The masks are just weird. You're totally fine wearing them, kind of a freedom of expression thing, but...it's totally fine for people to make fun of you for it. So. I guess deal with it...

The whole pirate radio "the truth will be freed, all will hear, REVOLUTION!" kind of cries in your writing though is really distracting. Talk like this compromises your credibility. The natural reply will be "well, I do the tests for me and no one else, so it doesn't matter" and then I'll say "yeah, but you put it on internet video and talk about freeing the masses, so that doesn't seem to follow." We needn't go down that route. Just tone it down.
 
First, thank you noss4. And talk about a surprise :eek:
And I mean the video being cut right before the moment the Strider broke.


Here are some observations:

1. I was very surprised to see such poor performance on cardboard and chopping wood. Maybe some of the more informed ones can readily explain why.

2. I found the concrete hammering quite impressive.

3. I was dissapointed there was no vice bending part.

4. The paracord handle failing both in durability and comfort came as no surprise.

5. My faith in S30V is restored. Well my faith in Strider's S30V is restored :)

6. With the paracord handle and non impressive wood/cardboard cutting/chopping performance, one can only imagine that most Striders are not meant for camp duties.


And please noss4, be careful with those stabs, I'd hate you to slide your hand to the blade while deanimating a garden chair...

I didn't do the vice test for one I was just having to much fun doing the other
and you can see when I pounded the knife into the 2x4 and tried to pull it out
I pushed in this direction many times almost lifting the work bench and the bench has about 500 pounds on it. I could hardly feel the blade flex.
I do wish I would have done the vice flex test. I'll do my best to stay safe.
 
Ya know what? I'd like to see you test a Dark ops stratofighter in all seriousness too. Nobody else will go near them based on the marketing, and you don't care about your knife "image", so that would be a good test, it would either make some eat crow(which they would never admit) or show that indeed, they are junk. Do it:thumbup:

No one will go near one. If this is so Then That really peaks my interest in a dark ops. I will go after anything at this point with no fear. I'll look into this.
 
I'm not a scientific tester. That is what I'm tying to avoid. I can't talk or debate some points on here their way over my head. I am in no way any kind of knife expert. and my tests are in no way the final word on any point.But for me at least I'm learning a lot and isn't that what this forum is all about.

I don't see why some of you haven't performed your own tests and video taped them for all to see. Maybe you have. I just have never seen them posted. Other then Cliff Stamps web site.

I understand people not wanting to do what I do with their knives but what about cutting tests on different blade types. They will do no harm to your knives. All it takes is the will and a little effort and execution. They will greatly add to the information and debate.

So get out those video cameras perform some tests whatever they may be.
I will watch. So will others.
 
Thanks noss4! Another great test! The BT Strider turned out to be much tougher that I expected!
I do not really understand people who criticise you.
You buy the knives for your own money - so you can do with them whatever you want. Your test arte done in specific way but they are not so unreal as many say. What's unreal in chopping wood or even bending the knife in vice - it resembles bending the knife in any log splitting. Even concrete hamerring tells something about strenth of the tip of a knife. When you chop a dirty log with knife sometimes you hit stones with the blade. Nothing uncommon - especially if you have to work at night with only a help of small flashlight.
I think people of low faith in their knives are affraid that it might turn out that they invest they money in pieces of $h!t, and that's the problem. If anyone wants the knife only for light cutting - without bending or twisting should stay with kitchen knives - as they are made only for cutting. Keep up the good job!
 
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