What knife would you like to see next from CPK?

Lorien

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
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Dec 5, 2005
Messages
20,658
Hey Lorien, i always was under the impression that a lot of base machete brands like tramontina kept their machete steel a bit soft as the regular use of machetes (i guess this is somewhat more the case for 16" and above) often included clearing grasses, bushes etc with sweeping blows quite close to the ground. Such swings made the chances of the blade hitting the ground or a concealed rock eventually pretty high and the soft steel meant youd get a roll rather than the blade chipping. Also meant sharpening was quicker and easier.

i myself have certainly hit the ground a few times when doing low blows with machetes and once hit a concealed star picket in long grass.

You think this doent hold much validity or perhaps is more applicable to lower quality steels that have a higher chance of big chips over than 3v?

no, I don't. I like quality tools, designed and manufactured for people who know how to use them*

*sorry, I reread my response and it reads different than what I was going for- didn't mean to come off as prickly

all mass produced tools have a place on the spectrum of quality

you can spend a few hundred dollars on a hammer, or you can spend ten dollars on a hammer

both hammers are meant to hit nails, both will incur damage with use. The high end hammer will not incur as much damage, will last much longer, (with proper care) and will be more enjoyable- especially for someone who relies on it regularly- to use

you could use the same analogy with any kind of knife. The common attributes that tie all kinds of knives together with something which imparts value, is edge holding and fit and finish

just because you are accustomed to soft, crappy gas station machetes does not mean there isn't a place in this world for a machete made from the highest grade materials, designed for peak performance

I've hacked into plenty of rocks with my D3V blades- have thrown them into rocks, (by accident) and have always managed to remove the surprisingly small amount of damage done. No major chipping to speak of over the past few(?) years

the trick with a machete is to get the bevel geometry and stock thickness right

geometry is crucial to a rock resistant edge
 
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Sep 25, 2016
Messages
131
no, I don't. I like quality tools, designed and manufactured for people who know how to use them*

*sorry, I reread my response and it reads different than what I was going for- didn't mean to come off as prickly

all mass produced tools have a place on the spectrum of quality

you can spend a few hundred dollars on a hammer, or you can spend ten dollars on a hammer

both hammers are meant to hit nails, both will incur damage with use. The high end hammer will not incur as much damage, will last much longer, (with proper care) and will be more enjoyable- especially for someone who relies on it regularly- to use

you could use the same analogy with any kind of knife. The common attributes that tie all kinds of knives together with something which imparts value, is edge holding and fit and finish

just because you are accustomed to soft, crappy gas station machetes does not mean there isn't a place in this world for a machete made from the highest grade materials, designed for peak performance

I've hacked into plenty of rocks with my D3V blades- have thrown them into rocks, (by accident) and have always managed to remove the surprisingly small amount of damage done. No major chipping to speak of over the past few(?) years

the trick with a machete is to get the bevel geometry and stock thickness right

geometry is crucial to a rock resistant edge

Hey thanks for the reply,
I see see what your saying with the D3V being so damn resistant to chipping compared to the steels used in most machetes that the whole concept of people keeping the metal a tad softer goes out the window.

I reckon a cpk machete would be one hell of a tool if it was made although on a side note i wonder if it would fully live up to the value you see in the cpk knives being made. By this i mean the vast majority of cheap as chips knives out there perform like garbage compared to a decent knife let alone a cpk due to shit design and materials. However machetes have always been pretty damn cheap and have always worked pretty damn well for the most part. A $20 tramontina will do a whole lot of work and last you one hell of a long time and there arnt that many knives that stack up to the value and performance level offered there. Like a lot of knives are way off with their wacky designs but the basic design of a good machete has been pretty well perfected and in production by a few brands around.

In other words whilst the better steel and edge retention is a given it'd be interesting to see if a cpk design machete would display the same level of design improvement over decent cheap machetes that you see with a cpk knife over the majority of other knives around. If the overall scaling of performance improvement was the same as that between regular knives and cpk knives thatd be one hell of a machete!
 

TRfromMT

Gold Member
Basic Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2016
Messages
4,860
Hey thanks for the reply,
I see see what your saying with the D3V being so damn resistant to chipping compared to the steels used in most machetes that the whole concept of people keeping the metal a tad softer goes out the window.

I reckon a cpk machete would be one hell of a tool if it was made although on a side note i wonder if it would fully live up to the value you see in the cpk knives being made. By this i mean the vast majority of cheap as chips knives out there perform like garbage compared to a decent knife let alone a cpk due to shit design and materials. However machetes have always been pretty damn cheap and have always worked pretty damn well for the most part. A $20 tramontina will do a whole lot of work and last you one hell of a long time and there arnt that many knives that stack up to the value and performance level offered there. Like a lot of knives are way off with their wacky designs but the basic design of a good machete has been pretty well perfected and in production by a few brands around.

In other words whilst the better steel and edge retention is a given it'd be interesting to see if a cpk design machete would display the same level of design improvement over decent cheap machetes that you see with a cpk knife over the majority of other knives around. If the overall scaling of performance improvement was the same as that between regular knives and cpk knives thatd be one hell of a machete!

All good points, and good discussion. My response is to say, "Yeah, but wait until you see what Lorien and team CPK do with the thing!" It will be next level, somehow, and we will all go "AHHHH!! So THAT's what they meant." :D

I've asked in the past for Lorien's and Nathan's take on a "bushcraft knife" - no further preconceived notions, but I'm sure it would be fantastic. Don't know what that would look like, but I'm sure I need one.
 

betzner

CenCal Coast
Platinum Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2007
Messages
7,573
Damn, that means I'm gonna hafta warehouse a kephart or two, and I said I would never get me no ugly knife, lol.:eek::D:D

Actually, I think the kephart is not ugly, just too simple for me. Now, a nessmuk, hey, that is Ugly with a cap U.
 
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Lorien

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Dec 5, 2005
Messages
20,658
Damn, that means I'm gonna hafta warehouse a kephart or two, and I said I would never get me no ugly knife, lol.:eek::D:D

Actually, I think the kephart is not ugly, just too simple for me. Now, a nessmuk, hey, that is Ugly with a cap U.

a little while ago, I drew up a nessmuk with kephart tendencies. Looked pretty good, good enough that I may have to make it some day
 

TommyGun56

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2014
Messages
7,003
More Shiv's Please, with a Dagger Grind:p
EDIT: And please offer them with "Edge-Cut Antique Micarta" and Black or Natural Liners;)
iv3pGrA.jpg


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