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Why no thumb studs?

Discussion in 'Spyderco' started by readyme, Mar 9, 2013.

  1. Reeek

    Reeek

    Aug 16, 2008
    Thumb studs get in the way of cutting through material using the full length of the blade. I consider the Spyder Hole to be superior to thumb studs for blade deployment
     
  2. SchweetGuitars

    SchweetGuitars

    164
    Jan 25, 2012
    Well then benchmade must be your manufacturer of choice.
     
  3. BladeChick777

    BladeChick777

    Jun 20, 2011
    You can flick open several of Spyderco's models.
    The back locks are a bit more difficult, but that's most back locks.
    I find the thumb hole easier to flick with.

    That and like said before, it doesn't hurt after a bunch of opening, no poking your thumb, can use more easily with gloves on, etc.
     
  4. shunsui

    shunsui Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 12, 2008
    Flicking a knife open and closed like a yo-yo is one of those things I'd never heard of until I hit the knife forums. Apparently a lot of people do it though. Personally I dislike thumb studs and don't own any knives with them yet. Luckily there's lots of nice knives out there.
     
  5. Mr. Sogetsu

    Mr. Sogetsu

    958
    Jun 11, 2006
    Spyderhole is superior way of deploying the blade in my experience. Wish all knives came with spyderholes to be honest...I would actually buy a different brand once in a while.
     
  6. Yo Mama

    Yo Mama

    Sep 25, 2011
    I'm not into studs. Give me a nice hole any day.....:foot:
     
  7. Chris "Anagarika"

    Chris "Anagarika"

    Mar 7, 2001
    As others have said, studs get in the way in most cutting using full length and depth of the blade (Rat 1 might be an exception, the stud is behind the blade grind). It also gets in the way in sharpening (non expert like me, knifenut1013 can do it to a VECP). I always take it off when sharpening.

    Opening a blade with hole is better and safer, because the ring formed by the hole will prevent slippage, and help redirecting the force. Imagine a push to 45 degree outward from the handle when opening, at certain stage, the hole will help redirecting the force. If user decides to keep pushing in 45 straight line, the blade might just stop, with the thumb resting inside the hole and only need to continue the movemeny by changing direction.

    If a stud is in place of the hole, the thumb will simply silde off the studs, and user has to 'find' the studs to continue. In high stress or fatigue situation, it is very dangerous trying to find one's way with a half open sharp blade (or 3/4 open in this case).

    The nature of the hole trapping the finger all the time is safer.

    These two obvious advantages are why hole is superior.

    PS: I can flick open back lock as well, although it takes more practice. Opening without flicking, hole all the way! :thumbup:
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2013
  8. bobo383

    bobo383 Gold Member Gold Member

    87
    Mar 2, 2012
    :thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:

    Also the thumb stud on my old Benchmade 700 gets in the way of the Sharpmaker stones.
     
  9. The-Stig

    The-Stig

    Jul 7, 2012
    I like the thumb hole because sometimes when I'm cutting using a knife that has thumb studs, material gets caught on the stud. I'm so used to not having to worry about that with my Spydercos. There's nothing on the blade to get in the way of cutting.
     
  10. Blades'n'45

    Blades'n'45

    197
    Feb 24, 2013
    the opening hole really is an ingenious design feature.
    it minimizes weight while offering multiple deployment options.
    only thing I don't like about them is they usually widen the blade
    and so you see most spydercos with big humps. A lot of them being
    less pocket friendly than other blades.
     
  11. tatteredmidnight

    tatteredmidnight

    335
    Mar 19, 2010
    I find that thumb studs to be very pocket unfriendly, having a tendency to rub and catch on pocket openings.
     
  12. NateReed

    NateReed

    543
    Jan 20, 2013
    I work in the freezer in a grocery store and always wear gloves. Spyder hole always works best. Flippers aren't bad either, but then I usually can't close it. I normally carry an Endura and a UK Pen knife to work with the gloves
     
  13. NateReed

    NateReed

    543
    Jan 20, 2013
    I often find non-knife people do that exact thing when opening them and almost cut themselves
     
  14. stabman

    stabman Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 17, 2007
    At times I've had knives with thumb studs "wave" open as I pulled them from the pocket. It was not intentional, and in a few cases almost stabbed me in the side.:eek:
    Holes are safer.
     
  15. Dabakr

    Dabakr

    52
    Mar 7, 2013
    I have recently bought my first spyderco with my only other experience with a hole being an oblong one on a cheap and unremarkable crkt pazoda. I didn't think about it much until the Spyderco came. I can honestly say after only a week I am liking the feel of the its distinct round hole. for an 'obsessive' flicker like myself- the hole feels a lot better then even the most comfortable stud. I am surprised at how fast I have gotten used to flicking open the (Ambitious) blade now that I have worked out its initial friction. I ordered a blue Persistence and now-after spending a little time on the BM forum I am thinking about purchasing the Spyderco Yojimbo2 or possible the Chicago instead of spending an equal amount on one of bm's assisted blades. (I not only find the Yoj2 interesting but I don't have any blades that style and think I would use it much more then a slicker looking assist. Does anyone have any opinions on the Yo2 as a useful edc?
     
  16. TotalDbag

    TotalDbag

    Nov 3, 2012
    I like a well designed thumbstud over a hole AND a flipper. And the hole can also hurt your finger just as much as a thumbstud. Some of the holes have a sharp edge on them, and when I get one of those sharp ones it hurts more than any thumbstud I've encountered. I find that the thumbstuds don't really get in the way of cutting, in MY experiences with MY knives.
    Most of the studs are right at the start of the edge, or before.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    These are all MY opinions.
    Even though the Skyline is technically a blade stop
     
  17. The-Stig

    The-Stig

    Jul 7, 2012
    I've never experienced discomfort using the thumb hole design. The same cannot be said for thumb studs. Also, there's times where I have to pull or push material right past where a thumb stud would normally be. It's good to know that you can cut all the way to the handle without binding up on a thumb stud.
     
  18. KNaB

    KNaB

    832
    Oct 18, 2008
    Same here. I like the indexing and functionality of the spyderhole. Some may say that I'm doing myself a disservice, but lack of a spyderhole is what has kept me from purchasing other great knives like CRK, hinderer, etc. There are, however, other custom options that I've been considering from those that have obtained a license for the hole such as Kingdom Armory and Yuna.
     
  19. Talley1013

    Talley1013

    414
    Oct 15, 2010
    If you can't flick a Spyderco faster than any knife with a thumb stud then yer doin it wrong.
     
  20. bigconig

    bigconig

    235
    Jun 9, 2008
    Thumbstuds have their place, and don't get me wrong, I love my Kershaws, BMs, Hinderer etc, BUT, 2 reasons why my Spydies get used more than other knives both stem from the lack of thumbstuds.

    1. Sleek design. No studs to get hung up on your pocket when deploying
    2. Lack of studs makes sharpening way easier on many sharpeners
     

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