Your COVID19 responses (projects you’re doing), let’s see ‘em, and mine (86 splitback whittler mod)

Sacto

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Joined
Jun 27, 2017
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665
Most of our cattle are Angus, but I have a handful of longhorns that I keep around because they look cool. One of the cows died last spring, so she is my latest shop project and is going to be wall art for my living room.
YDrnZ7y.jpg

For some reason the skull cracked in several places, so I started filling the cracks with superglue and sanding the skull and horns tonight.
pB1rHO6.jpg

QwTaUPJ.jpg

I’ll post more pictures when I finish it up. Hopefully it will be quick because it takes up a big chunk of my workbench.
 

JohnDF

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Joined
May 14, 2018
Messages
17,006
Most of our cattle are Angus, but I have a handful of longhorns that I keep around because they look cool. One of the cows died last spring, so she is my latest shop project and is going to be wall art for my living room.
YDrnZ7y.jpg

For some reason the skull cracked in several places, so I started filling the cracks with superglue and sanding the skull and horns tonight.
pB1rHO6.jpg

QwTaUPJ.jpg

I’ll post more pictures when I finish it up. Hopefully it will be quick because it takes up a big chunk of my workbench.
Cleaning those skulls can be a lot of work. One of the ranches I worked for raised Coriente cattle. The owner would stack the old skulls in his garage, the pile was huge. When we had down-time from work, my job was to go to the garage and start cleaning skulls.
 

JB in SC

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May 19, 2001
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Cleaning those skulls can be a lot of work. One of the ranches I worked for raised Coriente cattle. The owner would stack the old skulls in his garage, the pile was huge. When we had down-time from work, my job was to go to the garage and start cleaning skulls.


Dermestid beetles do a great job, taxidermists use them for European skull mounts.
 

Sacto

Basic Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2017
Messages
665
Cleaning those skulls can be a lot of work. One of the ranches I worked for raised Coriente cattle. The owner would stack the old skulls in his garage, the pile was huge. When we had down-time from work, my job was to go to the garage and start cleaning skulls.

Dermestid beetles do a great job, taxidermists use them for European skull mounts.


I left it out in the pasture since the spring and it looked like that when I checked on it yesterday, after I peeled off what was left of the hide. I left it on the ground and put an old water trough upside down on top of it to hide it (we get people wandering through from the casino and railroad). I think the trough allowed the bugs to really work on it without birds bothering the bugs. Now the work starts, hand sanding it to get it nice enough to hang in the house. It’s just like finishing an enormous knife handle. :D
 

scrteened porch

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Joined
Feb 19, 2012
Messages
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r9uOdaD.jpg

I patched the shield hole on the trapper and attempted to jig the Olsen Bowie. Not as regular as I had hoped to make it. Plenty more to jig, though.
I might see what a rasp does for grippiness. This glue-lam stuff is pretty slippery, which is the point of the exercise. A rasp should obscure my ridiculous pattern, too, but the grip is the main thing.
 

CelloDan

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Dec 2, 2017
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1,714
Wow, I would have never imagined a year ago that I was going to resurrect this thread.

Covid still here and has increased with a vengeance here in Ontario where things are at the breaking point.
Hard lock down for 6 weeks, the variants ravaging the province.

I just opened my little shop after a long winter.
A while ago I had glued pieces of leftover hardwoods ( mahogany, maple, walnut, ash).

I am going to brush up my woodturning skills, see if I can turn a hollow vessel for potpourri and fit it to the metal cover you see in the picture.

Wish me luck :)

3eHj8Ez.jpg
 

Bigfattyt

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Joined
Jun 23, 2007
Messages
18,434
Here is a Scagle inspired knife I forged for my dad for Christmas this year. Started as a 1/4 inch billet of 5160. I meant to leave more forged scale, but getting the blade geometry how I wanted it removed most of the marks I intended on leaving.

This was only my second attempt at a forged knife. First hidden tang.

yIRGBiC.jpg


Uk7MFGX.jpg


KiYU91K.jpg


hIwU7Xp.jpg


xAyCtux.jpg


vgHDjEL.jpg


xd2SEMV.jpg
 

JTB_5

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 6, 2017
Messages
5,760
Wow, I would have never imagined a year ago that I was going to resurrect this thread.

Covid still here and has increased with a vengeance here in Ontario where things are at the breaking point.
Hard lock down for 6 weeks, the variants ravaging the province.

I just opened my little shop after a long winter.
A while ago I had glued pieces of leftover hardwoods ( mahogany, maple, walnut, ash).

I am going to brush up my woodturning skills, see if I can turn a hollow vessel for potpourri and fit it to the metal cover you see in the picture.

Wish me luck :)

3eHj8Ez.jpg
Good luck!
 

Sacto

Basic Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2017
Messages
665
Since this thread popped back up, I’ll post this here. I finished this one up today. It’s a green river blank that I reshaped the blade a bit, added the sharpening choil, and added the scales. They are red g10 liners with leather micarta and copper pins. It’s basically little strips of shredded leather in resin. It’s a little hard to photograph, but interesting material.
LLciQnE.jpg

F515Hc3.jpg

Ny2wQx1.jpg

Now I just have to figure out how to carry it. I think I’ll try to make a pocket sheath when I have time.
 

CelloDan

Basic Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2017
Messages
1,714
Hollowing dry hardwoods glued together proved to be quite difficult with the basic tools I have but we are getting there.

An open bowl would be no problem. Getting under the rim to hollow around the form is the hard part.

Hopefully I don’t wreck it tomorrow as I try to finish it

RMTDjux.jpg
 
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