CPK and Whisky (or other vices), a pictorial

Pàdruig

Live and Let Die
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Dec 1, 2016
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7,903
I always get myself pulled into "ice or no ice" whisky discussions.

A couple of thoughts on this:
1.) It is my understanding that just about any master distiller in Scotland will tell you that whisky should be enjoyed with water (not ice!) - add water to taste, sometimes it only takes a drop.
2.) It is also my understanding that any master distiller in Scotland will tell you, "drink your whisky how you damn well like" (in essence, no judgement - whisky should bring folks together).

I prefer my whisk(e)y neat and rarely find a need to add water - though I did have a 25 Macallan once that very much needed a bit of H2O to smooth it out. Ice is just grounds for a good natured ribbing though and my wife just rolls her eyes at me when I poke fun at her (she likes ice in her whiskey). A couple of notable exceptions on her part though - Redbreast 12 and Aberlour 12 - she enjoys both of those neat.

This is a fun Scotch - the first single grain one that I think I've had.

MnZbeKS.jpg
 

Box_Opener

Gold Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2018
Messages
321
I always get myself pulled into "ice or no ice" whisky discussions.

A couple of thoughts on this:
1.) It is my understanding that just about any master distiller in Scotland will tell you that whisky should be enjoyed with water (not ice!) - add water to taste, sometimes it only takes a drop.
2.) It is also my understanding that any master distiller in Scotland will tell you, "drink your whisky how you damn well like" (in essence, no judgement - whisky should bring folks together).

I prefer my whisk(e)y neat and rarely find a need to add water - though I did have a 25 Macallan once that very much needed a bit of H2O to smooth it out. Ice is just grounds for a good natured ribbing though and my wife just rolls her eyes at me when I poke fun at her (she likes ice in her whiskey). A couple of notable exceptions on her part though - Redbreast 12 and Aberlour 12 - she enjoys both of those neat.

This is a fun Scotch - the first single grain one that I think I've had.

MnZbeKS.jpg

I like ice in Johnny Walker Black. It’s a blend but it tastes good and has a sentimental value to me (my Dad has a 1960’s bottle saved from a bar fire that he opened at my wedding—it tasted like caramel). Otherwise I flick some water in my whisky glass’s general direction and call it a night. More out of laziness than anything.

I feel like the older I get the less I care about how to drink what and why. It’s like fatigue. I’ve had so many this that and the other that now I don’t care if it’s pink and shoots rainbows at the ceiling—if it has alcohol then give it to me. My sister in law is always chasing down the next greatest IPA or Hudson Valley rye or whatever but I just can’t bother to even remember their names. Give me music, a chair to sit in, and good company. What else do you really need?
 

SpyderPhreak

Rocketman for hire
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I never put ice in Whisky. Water, sometimes. I'll experiment, it's fun. Amazing how sometimes just the right amount of water can really open up the bouquet. Like Dylan said, it can be as little as a drop of water. It's really cool the first time you experience that!

On the other hand, I will put ice in some Whiskey. Sometimes one of those huge ice balls, sometimes smaller cubes. Just depends on the whiskey. Sometimes neat. Again, I like to experiment.

Bottles change as they age too. Once opened, and some air is allowed into the bottle, the spirit will oxidize a bit, and it can change the overall character of it.

I always get myself pulled into "ice or no ice" whisky discussions.

A couple of thoughts on this:
1.) It is my understanding that just about any master distiller in Scotland will tell you that whisky should be enjoyed with water (not ice!) - add water to taste, sometimes it only takes a drop.
2.) It is also my understanding that any master distiller in Scotland will tell you, "drink your whisky how you damn well like" (in essence, no judgement - whisky should bring folks together).

I prefer my whisk(e)y neat and rarely find a need to add water - though I did have a 25 Macallan once that very much needed a bit of H2O to smooth it out. Ice is just grounds for a good natured ribbing though and my wife just rolls her eyes at me when I poke fun at her (she likes ice in her whiskey). A couple of notable exceptions on her part though - Redbreast 12 and Aberlour 12 - she enjoys both of those neat.

This is a fun Scotch - the first single grain one that I think I've had.

MnZbeKS.jpg
That sounds interesting. Aged 19 years too! :cool: I bet I'd like that being a highland. What grain is it?
 

Pàdruig

Live and Let Die
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Joined
Dec 1, 2016
Messages
7,903
I feel like the older I get the less I care about how to drink what and why. It’s like fatigue. I’ve had so many this that and the other that now I don’t care if it’s pink and shoots rainbows at the ceiling—if it has alcohol then give it to me. My sister in law is always chasing down the next greatest IPA or Hudson Valley rye or whatever but I just can’t bother to even remember their names. Give me music, a chair to sit in, and good company. What else do you really need?


I very much get this. I do consider myself to be a bit of a connoisseur and I enjoy trying new things, finding stuff that I’ve heard of (or never heard of), etc. I’ve also heard that bourbon chasing is akin to (or worse than) trying to score the most sought after sprint run knife. It sounds exhausting to me…

Sometimes, the finer things in life can be distilled (ha! Get it?) to just a few simple pleasures.

That sounds interesting. Aged 19 years too! :cool: I bet I'd like that being a highland. What grain is it?

That’s a great question and I had to look it up - doesn’t say on the label or tube it came in. Malted barley - interesting for a whisky…


This Islay has been making me pretty happy lately.

khSFACE.jpg
 

StoneAndSteel

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2019
Messages
492
but it didn't occur to me to bring any CPK with me.
I’m not saying it was a good idea… but I entered the country carrying it legally as I entered. Once I was in Paris itself I left it in a bag in the hotel or car since I was going to be places where, if found, it would likely be confiscated. But I love having a good knife with me whenever I can.
 
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