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Lets use those axes for what they were ment for.

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by rplarson2004, Feb 28, 2012.

  1. G-pig

    G-pig

    Jul 5, 2011
    Not much bucking to stove length. Lots of limbing and cutting to longer lengths though, but thats when the weight of the log is sufficient to not roll over on you. If I have to buck to stove length with an axe I'd probably try to rig something up. perhaps a log squared on 2 sides so as to lay flat and provide a flat side to prop the log against. I am not really sure, testing out a lot of different ideas would no doubt be the best way to determine a good method.
     
  2. trailmaker

    trailmaker

    506
    May 15, 2011
    Yeah that could be a fun project. It seems like the first thing you would need for efficient bucking would be a heavy immovable base like a big beam or log. Then add some pegs or a v channel to hold the target wood steady. I guess that would about do it. The backing beam could also serve as a nice bench when not being used for bucking.
     
  3. trailmaker

    trailmaker

    506
    May 15, 2011
    Here's my 2 1/4 lb. "Made in W. Germany" axe working on a fallen Coast Live Oak and some small firs.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    A four pound Council and an Aberl Garmisch teaming up on a Monterey Pine
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    Nice job. Thanks for the photos.
    More than any other task I think felling is most aided by a razor sharp bit. Glancing blows and wasted energy have no place in felling.
     
  5. bearhunter

    bearhunter

    Sep 12, 2009
    well, living in good old montana, its always an argument between husqvarna or stihl...

    some loggers use stihl and some use husqvarna... and each thinks the other one sucks:D

    its a debate that will never end around these parts... ive used both quite a bit...

    husqvarna for me anyday; more reliable, crank everytime, no fuss... just a great all around saw...

    the only thing stihl has on husqvarna is that they seem to be a little easier to work on... thing is; you dont have to worry about that with a husqvarna...
    cause' they dont break down;)
     
  6. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    So Husqvarna is Ford and Stihl is Chevrolet?


    Did I just start WWIII? [​IMG]
     
  7. M3mphis

    M3mphis

    Jan 13, 2011
    Pretty much! In keeping with the analogy does that mean husky's are more prone to major, catastrophic failures???? :D :devilish:
     
  8. Section10

    Section10

    114
    Jun 8, 2010
    Good old chainsaws. I started out with a Montgomery Wards. It should have been a boat anchor. Then I got a Craftsman. Marginally better. Then I got an old McCullough which was pretty good and I used it a lot. Then for many years I used Husqvarnas. They are fine saws. In my later years I have a Stihl. A good saw. The only thing I didn't like about Husqvarna is when you buy one you are paying for the name and unless you are going to be sawing 40+ hours a week consistently, they are too costly.
     
  9. bearhunter

    bearhunter

    Sep 12, 2009
    husqvarnas are like a ferrari and stihl is like a dodge...:D:D
     
  10. G-pig

    G-pig

    Jul 5, 2011
    And Disston is like a model A!
     
  11. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
  12. trailmaker

    trailmaker

    506
    May 15, 2011
    Yes I'm finding that to be true. Sharpness and accuracy seem to be at least as important as strength.
     
  13. bearhunter

    bearhunter

    Sep 12, 2009
  14. GingivitisKahn

    GingivitisKahn

    Jun 8, 2010
    Can the little guys play too?

    [​IMG]

    ---
    Beckerhead #42
     
  15. trailmaker

    trailmaker

    506
    May 15, 2011
    Nice work Khan, I don't see tomahawks getting used for work very often. What size limbs can that handle, and how does it compare to a small axe (if you have one)?
     
  16. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    Sure! Is that maple? Fairly hard wood. Good test for a hawk or axe.
     
  17. GingivitisKahn

    GingivitisKahn

    Jun 8, 2010
    That was actually a pic from a chop-off between my trailhawk and my beloved BK9 (TH won in the chopping category, btw). As to what size limbs it can handle - dunno but much bigger than that. I do some volunteer trail maintenance in the areas where I hunt and have dismantled some pretty decent sized trees (same diameter as my thigh or bigger) with nothing more than a BK9 or even a BK2 so I can't imagine the trailhawk having issues with those.

    Comparing that hawk to an axe... Disclaimer: I consider myself very much an axe rookie. My use of them has been limited mostly to splitting (LOTS) of firewood at camps since I was a little kid. Granted those were full sized cheap axes (typically dull as a particularly dull butter knife) but for splitting, they leave the hawk way in the dust. For chopping - that hawk bites pretty deep but an axe is still going to get that job done more quickly.

    Having said that, I think the TH works better for me than any hatchet I've ever tried. Suspect that's because this hawk has a relatively long handle (20 inches by my estimate - maybe a bit more) as compared to the short handled hatchets I've tried. The longer lever is a big deal. Can't compare it to one of the mid-sized axes - never tried one.

    Think so - we have a ton of it in the area.


    ---
    Beckerhead #42
     
  18. Sulaco

    Sulaco Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 15, 2003
    I don't have time to take pictures when I am working. Even if I did, I hate having to drag my camera out, take the picture, make sure the exposure is good, take the memory card out, stick it in my computer, upload it to my computer, resize it for web viewing, upload it to whatever host I want to use, take the card back out, put it back in my camera, put my camera up, come here, write a post, go to the picture host website, copy the link, paste it here, then post just so you guys can see my axes. Sorry, too much worthless work for me. Now if you'd like to come over and help me fell some trees, you can see my axes at work! :p
     
  19. Sulaco

    Sulaco Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 15, 2003
  20. rplarson2004

    rplarson2004

    12
    Feb 8, 2011
    Had some more fun with my axes. As you can see i have a long way to go.
    [​IMG]
    Before
    [​IMG]
    After
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I had a blast:D
     

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