Lost in the woods - Pick one of these knives!

One more vote for the Buck 110.

A splinter picker tip as on the Para is not needed and could be a liability where strength is concerned.

What will you pick splinters with then? :D

Seriously though, the 110 and Para have about the same tip thickness. I just looked at a new 110 and my reprofiled Para side by side and they were comparable, so a stock Para might be thicker than the 110 tip.

A strong lock is mandatory for safety concerns, as an accident in the woods could be fatal. Exit the Vic.

I've been using Victorinox non-locking knives since I was 5 and never once did I cut myself due to the lack of a lock. I can't think of many survival scenarios where lock or no lock would even matter. That aside, I'd bet 100$ on the spot the compression lock on the Para is stronger than Buck's lockback.

The 110 has been proven in the woods over the years as a strong and reliable knife.

So have the other two choices.
 
Man, Vivi, I would have an easier time shaking a Pit Bull off my ankle than shaking you out of your opinion. :eek:;):)

I have 3 Para-Militaries and I love them all, so I am quite comfortable with them in the woods. Yes, it is a tossup for me between the 110 and the Para. I chose the 110 because I have had much more experience with it.

That said, if the Victorinox choice had been the OHT, I would have gone with that. And I am not changing my mind...I think. ;)

Edit - P.S. Congrats on 4K, Vivi.
 
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Longer clip blade and the brass butt end bolster comes in handy for hammering. The only down side is 425M on my model is inferior to 30V. Ask a Vietnam Veteran about the 110. Most of the ones I have known and know if they couldn't have a Mark II, Randall 7 or similar knife wanted a 110 if they had to depend on a folder.
 
Longer clip blade and the brass butt end bolster comes in handy for hammering. The only down side is 425M on my model is inferior to 30V. Ask a Vietnam Veteran about the 110. Most of the ones I have known and know if they couldn't have a Mark II, Randall 7 or similar knife wanted a 110 if they had to depend on a folder.

I don't think the extra length is particularly useful in most situations, beyond giving a longer cutting edge to dull. I think even with less edge the S30V Para would last longer during cutting tasks than the standard 110's. Now the S30V 110 would be a different story.

I don't know of many things I'd want to hammer with the brass 110 that a stout stick or brick couldn't handle.
 
Man, Vivi, I would have an easier time shaking a Pit Bull off my ankle than shaking you out of your opinion. :eek:;):)

I have 3 Para-Militaries and I love them all, so I am quite comfortable with them in the woods. Yes, it is a tossup for me between the 110 and the Para. I chose the 110 because I have had much more experience with it.

That said, if the Victorinox choice had been the OHT, I would have gone with that. And I am not changing my mind...I think. ;)

Edit - P.S. Congrats on 4K, Vivi.

Hahah, thanks.

I don't begrudge anyone for choosing the Buck 110 or any other folder over one I think is superior for the job. The point you raise, familiarity, counts for a lot. It's one of the reasons I've always gone back to a Vic Classic on the keychain over a Leatherman, not that the latter is a bad product. I will say that I think the Para is a more suitable survival knife, but I think either of the three would be perfectly serviceable. I'd base my choice on the environment. More urban and I would choose the SAK, if you're talking out in the woods I'd go with the Para. Why? Urban environments have beer, and the SAK has a bottle opener. :D
 
...I'd base my choice on the environment. More urban and I would choose the SAK, if you're talking out in the woods I'd go with the Para. Why? Urban environments have beer, and the SAK has a bottle opener. :D

Heh, best damn logic I've heard all night! :D
 
Unless you have tasks you do with your Spydercos and 110's you wouldn't do with the Farmer, in which case I'd like to hear them.
Basically, the Buck 110 and the Para are stronger due to the thicker blades which is more forgiving if the user makes a mistake and torques or jams the blade while it's in thick material.
The thicker blades are less likely to snap than the thinner Farmer blade.

It seems to have a solid, time-proven track record based on the feedback of the knife. Not as long of a track record as the 110, but long enough for me.
Consider this....
The Para-Military has only been available for about four years.
And as far as knives go, it is certainly not a low budget knife for the masses.
Which leads me to believe that there probably have not been that many Para's sold to the average "working Joe".
I'm just guessing but I would think that four thousand a year would be an optimistic number....so you have maybe sixteen-thousand Para's in the hands of users.
Now it's also probably a safe guess that about half of those users have never used the Para for any seriously difficult cutting tasks....so maybe only about eight-thousand users have actually pushed the Para to its limits.
With that in mind, as nice as the Para is, I simply cannot agree that it has much of a track record.

Ergos are largely subjective so I won't spend long here. The Farmer works great for me, long term included.
Maybe for you, but for the vast majority of folks, the thicker and longer handle of the 110 is going to be much easier on the hand than they slimmer and shorter Farmer handle.
Look at most of your gardening and farming tools....notice that the handles tend to be larger and more hand-filling?
Smaller and thinner handles generally cause blisters and hand fatigue.
And when slippery from fluids like deer blood, the smaller handle affords less control....not to mention that it's easier to slip and cut oneself with a smaller handled knife.


Here's some pictures to give folks a better idea of the handle size difference.
The Buck in my hand....

HPIM5183.jpg




And the Victorinox in my hand....

HPIM5182.jpg


One little slip and my fingers would be on the Vic blade, no doubt about it.


Your comparison of the Para and 110 isn't fair. Take the clip off the Para then compare them.
Perhaps, but if you had the Para clipped to your pocket at the time you got lost in the woods, how are you going to then remove the clip?
Without a screwdriver, you're stuck with the clip til you get rescued or hike back to civilization.

When using a random stone from a creekbed or whatnot I can take a dulled edge to serviceable condition in under a minute. I don't consider that hard either. What do you define easy as?
Wow, you're a lot faster than me!
I can't take a dull S30V blade and get it to a serviceable edge, using a rock from the ground, in one minute.
But I suspect that we have different notions of what "dull" and "serviceable" might mean. ;)
Regardless, I'll bet you can still sharpen the Farmer and the 110 even faster.

Buck 110's get tarnish on the brass if you even take them out of the clamshell :p
Rust is very bad on a knife.
Tarnish is really just cosmetic.

I've never had my Spyderco liners corrode except when sweat got trapped in between the liner and G10 scale of my Cara Cara. Came off easily with some sandpaper.
But have you ever been lost in the woods, perhaps constantly wet from rain and snow and sweat, , perhaps for weeks?
I'm not saying that the Para is a rust-bucket, but I do think that it would rust a bit quicker than the Farmer or the 110.

I've been using Victorinox non-locking knives since I was 5 and never once did I cut myself due to the lack of a lock. I can't think of many survival scenarios where lock or no lock would even matter.
But if one is lost, tired, hungry, dehydrated, cold, and weak....it's much easier to make a mistake or use bad judgement when cutting something.
And a locking folder is simply more forgiving than a non-locking folder.

I'm not saying that the Farmer or the Para-Military are bad knives....they're both great knives....I just think the 110 would be better if one was lost in the wilderness.

Having said that, I would choose the Victorinox SwissTool over the 110 if that had been an option.
 
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Allen,

Have you considered a sales position with Buck Knives? Hell, I'm ready to go buy another 110 right now. :D
 
Basically, the Buck 110 and the Para are stronger due to the thicker blades...

I know, but my point was in a survival scenario I don't think I'd be trying to baton my folders through wood or anything. Plus the saw or screwdrivers can pry or section wood, thus saving the blade from work. The awl can also drill wood without worry of losing your knife tip. Also, the SAK's tip is more likely to bend than the Buck or Para in the event it is pushed too far, where the latter two are more likely to chip.


Consider this....*snip*

It doesn't have the track record of the 110, no, but it has positive reviews from the few years it has been out and more importantly for me it's track record in my own personal use has been exceptional. FWIW same thing with the other two knives.


Maybe for you...One little slip and my fingers would be on the Vic blade, no doubt about it.

*shrug* I like long, secure handles like a Spyderco Manix or Military, or the Buck 110, as much as the next person, but I've never had a problem with the SAKs handle. The Buck is a better handle in terms of balance, ergos and security, but the SAK's is still serviceable. I've used this very model SAK many times sawing wood, opening beers or carving wood in below 0 temps, with and without gloves on, and I never once had an issue with it.



Perhaps, but if you had the Para clipped to your pocket at the time you got lost in the woods, how are you going to then remove the clip?
Without a screwdriver, you're stuck with the clip til you get rescued or hike back to civilization.

I wouldn't remove the clip because mine has a custom tip up wire clip :D

On a more serious note, I wouldn't. I decided, after a year + of ranting on how much better clipless Spydercos felt in hand, that the accessibility the clips offers outweigh their drawbacks. You already mentioned a scenario this would be applicable to, which is self defense. I know you have a practiced draw with your 110, but me and most others will find the Para quicker to operate. Having the knife on a sheath or clipped makes it a bit more accessible to the weak side hand as well should you injure your main hand and need to access your tool in our hypothetical rambo scenario. :D

But have you ever been lost in the woods, perhaps constantly wet from rain and snow and sweat, , perhaps for weeks?
I'm not saying that the Para is a rust-bucket, but I do think that it would rust a bit quicker than the Farmer or the 110.

Not for weeks, more like a night. My knives didn't get wet though, just me. My waterproof coat protects them well. My Para has been exposed to sweat, acidic fruit juices and water numerous times and done fine, though most this exposure has been to the blade or G10 and not the SS liners. Regardless, I don't plan on staying wet in any scenario, survival or play.


But if one is lost, tired, hungry, dehydrated, cold, and weak....it's much easier to make a mistake or use bad judgement when cutting something.
And a locking folder is simply more forgiving than a non-locking folder.

I'm not saying that the Farmer or the Para-Military are bad knives....they're both great knives....I just think the 110 would be better if one was lost in the wilderness.

Having said that, I would choose the Victorinox SwissTool over the 110 if that had been an option.

Agreed on the fatigue point. In theory they are safer, but again in real world use the SAK's done me fine. Treat it like the slipjoint it is and one should be fine.

I'd take a Leatherman Wave or Vic Swisstool as well. Two blades to dull, pair of scissors, diamond file for sharpening anything you find to make spearheads or other tools out of, can opener, saw, bottle opener etc.
 
The knfe in my pocket would actually be the" MilitearySpyderco Paramilitary - S30V plain edge" so I don't have to think about it.
 
my first knife as a kid was a buck 110 and still have it today, it's been through a lot and still pulling it's weight.. Solid folder and it's concept lead to many variations of lock back knives..

I always have a sak with me, but never end up using it if I have a 110...
 
Depends length of interval living in the forest.
If its within a week, I'll go with SAK, otherwise I'll go with 110.

SAK can do more things than 110 but maybe harder to repair it by myself.
 
How about Puma's old 971 Game Warden? It's like a Buck 110 with an additional 3" double-cut saw blade.

Maybe it's not made anymore, though.
 
Spyderco Paramilitary. I'm not one to trust liner locking knives, but I trust Spyderco's design.

I'm tempted to go with the SAK just for the wood saw--but I'd much rather have the locking blade with a full-size handle.

And the S30V over the 420HC on the Buck. If I'm cold, possibly wet, and probably starving, I'd much rather keep splitting kindling, or hopefully preparing a meal with an OK edge than worry about putting a new shaving sharp edge on a knife with a rock.
 
buck 110 all the way
no screws, easy to sharpen, longer blade, and weight is no concern in the woods, as concealing too
and i does feel stronger, due to its weight
 
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