What did you rehang today?

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Irongun324, May 1, 2013.

  1. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    From around 1933-1944, some Plumb Voyageurs were used as the official Girl Scout axes (with GSA emblem on green heads), according to this book on scouting equipment posted by Alocksley:

     
  2. archertl

    archertl

    195
    Nov 3, 2013
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  3. erik the red

    erik the red

    341
    Nov 15, 2009
    Finished this Hults Bruk 19" today.
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  4. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    Well done! A new life for a vintage axe head. You can see, and feel, that overly thick modern replacement handles sort of overwhelm the size of the head. But that too can be rectified with a rasp or power sander.
     
  5. erik the red

    erik the red

    341
    Nov 15, 2009
    Thank you sir! Indeed the heft and girth of the belly as it moves into the shoulder area of the handle is more than I would like in a small forest axe, especially when choking up for fine carving/detailing. But like you alluded to, all it takes is a few minutes to thin that out! In all, I am pleased with the result. Now I need to get to work finding a head for the boys axe handle I have laying around!
     
  6. 333.okh

    333.okh

    122
    Mar 23, 2011
    best handle i have seen in years..............would look good on the Norlund Hudson pattern I found recently as well
     
  7. archertl

    archertl

    195
    Nov 3, 2013
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    Jasper33 likes this.
  8. the possum

    the possum

    Jul 31, 2002
    Thanks for the compliment. And I owe some thanks to City of the South for his earlier one as well. I split another handle blank out of that same piece of firewood while I was at it, so I'll have one on hand next time I come across an oddball sized head.

    By the way, I'm also an Elmer Keith fan.
     
  9. DarthTaco123

    DarthTaco123

    Mar 28, 2013
    Was in the process of hanging this lovely Forest King baltimore kentucky pattern when a crack I didn't notice before popped out. Going to have to V out the crack and fill it full of weld I suppose.

    Thought it was just a cold shut from the forging process and ignored it. Won't be doing THAT again, this is the first axe that's done this to me.
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  10. jblyttle

    jblyttle

    Sep 3, 2014
    A few recent projects. All are new handles, but some are OLD new handles. I sanded the old ones to get to some fresher wood before finishing them. The House Handle on the large axe I thinned somewhat and could probably have kept going.

    There are a few nice old hammers, a Collins half hatchet, a Warren large hatchet (I love the pattern in the handle) and a Swedish 3lb head on a 28" handle.

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  11. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    I like that Warren.
     
  12. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    JB you're getting pretty darn good at this. Were you to thin-saw a N-S and E-W wedge kerf in hammer handles you could dispense with steel wedges altogether. Go for it! I re-handled a large hammer (BFH in fact) for a heavy equipment mechanic friend 3-4 years ago and purposely wedged it with wood in two directions to see how it would hold up. So far so good; I was there today and the handle is beat to sh-- and blackened with oil/grease but the head has, so far, not become loose.
     
  13. tobiism

    tobiism

    Jun 28, 2013
    A friend gave me this cool old double bit head. Cruiser 2.75lb size with a full size eye. Put a razor sharp mirrored chopping and splitting edge and whittled down a house handle 30" handle. No markings on the head, no ridges and the steel is excellent! [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  14. jblyttle

    jblyttle

    Sep 3, 2014
    Very nice!
     
  15. garry3

    garry3

    Sep 11, 2012
    Not sure what the intended use was for this little Plumb. Maybe a flooring hatchet? Any way it had never been hung from back in the day when they could be purchased with out a handle, because everyone could hang them to suit them selves. I have wanted to try out a curved bit on a single bevel hewing hatchet for awhile now so this one fit the bill. It also has ears which I like, otherwise I am just talking to myself.

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    That old Heller file made short work of sharpening the hatchet. It was all it needed to shave the hair on my arm.
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    The secondary bevel is something that I have not seen before. It may have a purpose.
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    Straight handle for the hardened poll.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2016
  16. rockman0

    rockman0 Gold Member Gold Member

    May 5, 2013
    Interesting hatchet Garry, Let us know you like that curved bit.
     
  17. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    Garry3; I wouldn't be surprised if most hewing hatchets/axes had secondary bevels when they were brand spanking new. Much less metal to remove during the first 2 or 3 re-sharpenings.
     
  18. the possum

    the possum

    Jul 31, 2002
    I don't have pictures of it, but my Dad has a new-old-stock hewing hatchet. I'm pretty sure it's from the early part of the 1900's, and I don't remember now whether it's a Keen Kutter or a Diamond Edge. Anyway, it also has a secondary bevel like this. But what really surprised me, is they also sharpened the back side of the bit a little. More than was necessary to simply remove a burr/wire edge. To me, that starts to defeat the whole purpose of having the back side flat all the way to the edge. But it's there, and I'm 99% sure it's the original factory edge.
     
  19. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    How did you conclude that it had never been hung? I'm just wondering because the toe looks a little short to me.
     
  20. garry3

    garry3

    Sep 11, 2012
    Just the camera angle. It was factory fresh. Black paint everywhere, including inside the eye. Not a scratch to be found in the eye, on the poll or to the cutting edge.
     

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