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What "Traditional Knife" are ya totin' today?

JohnDF

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Joined
May 14, 2018
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16,814
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I've never been a big fan of the 110, but that one is crazy cool.
 
Joined
Jul 4, 2017
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1,304
Hiking, birdwatching, and searching for early spring wildflowers, I'm carrying my two-dot 112 and my Case small stockman. I find that a combination of a "larger" and a "smaller" knife work out very well for me. (The definition of those two descriptors varies from day to day. E.G., some days 3.5" might be "large" and some days it might be "small." :p)

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JTB_5

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Oct 6, 2017
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5,760
Happy Opening Day!!!! Pic originally posted in 2012.....wish I still had the knife.
Peter

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That's some interesting jigging, right there. Does GEC have a name for that pattern of jigging?

I'm showing off one of my earlier acquisitions today, in addition to the ever-present Camillus and Case mini-trapper. I purchased this stag Buck 110 in early 2001, back when the Buck custom shop was called Pete's Custom Knife Shoppe. I ordered the blade partially serrated, because I was doing a lot of rope work back then, but still wanted some plain edge for general outdoor use. All in all, it's probably the only combo edge I've ever not regretted purchasing. Buck ground some great serrations, and it has always excelled at its job.

The Sambar stag that Buck chose is absurdly thick and beautiful. I guess it was just easier to get huge chunks of gorgeous stag back then, before the 2003 export ban began. Buck seriously earned bonus points on this knife, perfectly shaping the stag with finger grooves. Between the finger grooves and stag thickness, the handle provides a grip security and comfort I've rarely felt on a folding knife.

The steel is BG-42, which doesn't seem to be very popular anymore, but I still love it. BG-42 takes a very nice edge, and holds it quite well. Buck/BOS got the heat treatment just right, and the edge is ground nice and thin, this knife being made just after Buck introduced its newer thinner Edge 2000 grind.

It's hard to capture in pictures, but Joe Houser from Buck had the blade engraved for me at one point, with its name The Angry Beaver. It got this name one weekend in the Adirondacks, while I was whittling away out in front of our cabin. My father-in-law made a remark about it cutting like an angry beaver, and the name just stuck. After that day, any time I pulled out my trust 110, someone would yell, "Beware the angry beaver!!!"

I've wanted to retire this knife many times, but it often comes back from the archives and into use. It's just too great a knife to be stored away, I guess. The brass has a few dings and scratches, and I haven't polished it recently, but even so, The Angry Beaver still a beauty to behold.

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That's a cool knife, and a great name for a knife. Thanks for sharing!
 

Whetstone39

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2013
Messages
3,843
That looks like an exceptional fixed blade, Tom! That looks like it would excel at just about any day-to-day chore.


Went with this older Barlow today. It isn't the finest of knives but I really like it. It practically sings when you open and close the blades, some of the best walk and talk in my collection.

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Thanks Dylan! That is a fantastic photo of the Barlow :thumbsup:


Outstanding Dwight :thumbsup:

These two today.

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