What did you rehang today?

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Irongun324, May 1, 2013.

  1. Irongun324

    Irongun324

    67
    Mar 22, 2012
    I drool over every rafting pattern I see on here. Especially that Plumb shape. Nicely done!
     
  2. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    It's a standard cruiser in size and weight. Typical handle length is 28" but I've seen them as short as 26". I think it's a big enough axe that you would prefer the full 28" haft.
     
  3. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012

    That's a good looking axe. That dark mahogany wedge is great. Makes me want to experiment a bit more when I run through the latest batch of wedges I cut.
     
  4. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    Sweet!


    The 5-lb Plumb rafting axe I bought from Bernie Weisgerber is on it's original Perma-bonded haft. It's 24-1/2". So the 26" haft is close to original. This length reinforces the frequent use of this tool as a hammer for driving log dogs and such. That length haft matches up well with a sledge of that weight.

    My personal 5-lb Plumb rafting axe is on a 36" handle and it is my dedicated splitter. It's outa this world for splitting. Both have waffle polls and a factory banana grind.
     
  5. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012


    That's fresh! Poll and bit are almost immaculate. Great job on a tough hang. Much respect.
     
  6. Agent_H

    Agent_H

    Aug 21, 2013
    Cajun- I've never para-corded anything before. This Craftsman has a "Mad Max" wood collecting feel. Did your handle have some over-strike damage or just insurance against it? I gave a similar Craftsman to my Dad this Christmas but it looks like it would be scared of yours. Great picture with the anvil btw.

    I like them for that reason. Yours looks great. I've hung only 3 but do think it gets easier after a couple.

    How would you describe the difference with fitting a Jersey- I mean what conscious steps does one have to take (different than non-Jersey's) to make the lugs fit the shoulder with less suprise/frustration?

    Definitely don't want to hijack this thread into a how-to but we have some skilled axe hanging going on here.

    Ah, Friday :)
     
  7. jblyttle

    jblyttle

    Sep 3, 2014
    Thanks, I do it just because I like the look of it. I have a ton of scrap decking material. I have the ipe too, but making a wedge on the bandsaw ruined the blade and the mahogany gives the same look. The last couple of whacks from the mallet usually splits it into several pieces, but above where I'm cutting it off. If any of the splits go into the wedge itself, it's ok because they are squeezed so tight that it does not matter. You can see one at the back of the wedge near the poll.

    You can see the result of me cutting ipe by the scorching on my cuts, the blade is so dull. I happen to like that look too so that's good. I keep forgetting to order a new blade but when I do it is not touching ipe. I use that 9" saw for nothing really other than cutting old handles off and cutting the top straight after wedging.
     
  8. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    It depends on what you want it to look like. You can just thin the shoulders down as you normally would but further down and hang it like any other axe. But I think it looks better if the shape of the shoulders follows the shape of the lugs. I've achieved this with rasps, gouges, knives, sand paper or even power sanders.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. SC T100

    SC T100

    Apr 2, 2014
    Yeah I thought the same thing. I'm hoping to hit up one of the local wood places that carries nice, exotic woods for some future carving. I'm hoping I can use some scraps as nice wedges for future re-hangs.
     
  10. SC T100

    SC T100

    Apr 2, 2014
    Thanks! Yeah I had read that most had originally come with a shorter handle....makes sense. I have no doubt that head on a 36" handle would blow through some wood.
     
  11. jblyttle

    jblyttle

    Sep 3, 2014
    So this is what real skill looks like. As someone learning the art and becoming proficient with standard basic hangs, I really appreciate the work and skill on display here. I like sitting here looking at the lines and contours, I only wish that I could touch that wood. Bravo.

    This is why I am so thankful for this forum. There would be people out there doing this work, but the rest of us would not know about it, would not see or appreciate it and certainly would not learn from it. I have gained so much knowledge in so little time (with untold additional knowledge to gain) that would have been impossible otherwise. I may have tried a few things, sucked at it, gotten frustrated and moved on. Many thanks to all that have patience for the initiates.
     
  12. phidauex

    phidauex

    20
    Jan 6, 2015
    Hi folks, new to the forum, but thought I'd share a few hang jobs. I do a fair amount of hammers, but this was my first "real" axe refurb. I looked at a lot of pictures here to help me through it! I'm pretty happy with how it came out.

    First a hammer. It is a Plumb 15oz. "Geologist's Hammer". Came to me in a box of free hammers, each more rusty than the last. Most are not great quality, but I'm rehanging them one at a time for fun. Was pleased to see this Plumb come out of the box, though you couldn't read the stamp until the rust was removed. Removed the rust and scale with a twisted wire brush on a bench grinder (not too hot), then cleaned up the edges with a belt sander. Applied cold bluing, waxed with Johnson's Paste Wax, and rehung on a Vaughn handle, slightly reshaped, torched, and finished with Danish Oil and beeswax. Pretty happy with it.

    [​IMG]
    Plumb Hammer - overall by phidauex, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Plumb Hammer - stamp detail by phidauex, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Plumb Hammer - Head detail by phidauex, on Flickr

    Next up is the axe. It is an unknown make, though I'd appreciate any thoughts you may have. It came to me on a split, dried out handle, very rusty. Typical shop corner axe condition. My father in law has owned it a long time, though he has no memory of where it came from. ;)

    It does have a clear stamp, but it seems like an owner's stamp, not a makers mark. Though if you recognize it, let me know! The head is just about 3 lbs, and the whole axe is 4 lbs, 2 oz.

    I used hand files and a slow belt sander to bring down the extensive mushrooming, half rounds to clean out the eye. After cleaning up the head, I used two applications of cold bluing, brightened with steel wool, and waxed with beeswax.

    The handle was a nice find - it is a 36" "Green Knight" hickory handle that my father in law has had lying around in the package for decades. It required only a little shaping, and is quite nice. Grain isn't perfect, but pretty darn good. Thinner than most modern handles, with a good profile in the hand. I like it a lot. Reshaped slightly on a belt sander and with rasps to drop the head down further on the shoulder. Good solid fit with a new wedge. Finished with Danish Oil and beeswax. Sanded to 600 grit, except on the lower fixed hand part which was re-roughed before final finishing with 100 grit to give it some bite.

    The edge was very damaged, so I reset both the primary and secondary bevels with an angle grinder and 120 grit paper flap wheel. Took my time, letting it cool down whenever it got above "finger warm". Ended with what I think is a pretty convincing convex bevel. Didn't use a jig, but did visually check the angles periodically with an angle finder on a file. Finished the sharpening up to 1500 grit wet sandpaper on a flat block. I probably wouldn't shave with it, but it seems like a good edge. I'd appreciate any recommendations you may have.

    [​IMG]
    Unknown Axe - overall by phidauex, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Unknown Axe - head by phidauex, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Unknown Axe - haft detail by phidauex, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Unknown Axe - Edge detail by phidauex, on Flickr

    I've got another axe I'm finishing up now - a nice looking Kelly Red Warrior. Doing a bit of a paint job to echo the original design. I'll post pics when it is done!

    Thanks - Sam
     
  13. Double Ott

    Double Ott

    Jan 3, 2011
    phidauex, you sure did a very nice job hanging your hammer and axe. Your workmanship is very apparent on both of them.

    Tom
     
  14. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    Phine work, Phidauex! They both look great.

    How do you like working with Danish oil? I've been using tung oil and I like it but I'm always open to experimenting with something different. I've read that Danish oil can be based on either tung oil or linseed oil. Which kind or brand are you using?
     
  15. jblyttle

    jblyttle

    Sep 3, 2014
    Awesome work! I believe that I have heard that the "M" marked heads are made by Vaughan, but I cannot bet my life on that. I have also heard of Plums like this. Probably one or the other, but we will need more wisdom from other members.
     
  16. cityofthesouth

    cityofthesouth

    Jan 29, 2014
    Agent_H likes this.
  17. the5farrs

    the5farrs

    223
    Jan 28, 2013
    Thanks for the nice comments. I've been turned onto axes and learned a lot from this forum.
     
  18. phidauex

    phidauex

    20
    Jan 6, 2015
    Thanks! I like the Danish Oils more than working with BLO or raw oils. "Danish Oil" is just a blend of an oil (like Linseed or Tung), poly or alkyd varnish, and thinner, usually in equal parts (or close to it). Commercial danish oils tend to be a bit heavy on the thinner (cheaper to make). They also often include some drying agents to speed up the curing. For these I was using Watco Danish Oil, which is a good commercial blend, linseed oil based, I think. I get most of my wood finishes free from the local hazardous material dropoff - it is free for residents to drop off chemicals, and anything usable they put back up on a free shelf. I usually come in with a few gallons of motor oil, and leave with a few bottles of old wood finishes.

    What I like about it is that it dries faster and harder than linseed oil, but without getting "plasticy" like a full poly finish. Still hand rubs in nicely, but without the annoying gummy-ness of BLO. If you mix your own, you can include a little more varnish to make it "harder" or a little more oil to make it "softer". Even BLO with 25-50% thinner is easier to work with than straight BLO, in my opinion.
     
  19. phidauex

    phidauex

    20
    Jan 6, 2015
    Looks great! I need to do a slightly better job fitting at the top and getting the wedge to seat full-width. Little details like that really make a difference. Great photography, too.
     
  20. phidauex

    phidauex

    20
    Jan 6, 2015
    Thanks for the tip - Yesteryears suggests that some Plumbs have an "M" stamp, but they show it being a different shape - this has a more "fluid" font. I found one picture with the same stamp on another forum, but they weren't sure if it was a Plumb or a Collins. The text above the M must be the weight - 3 1/2. I had been reading it as a "V", but that doesn't make any sense.
     

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